I am so confused with the following methods. Which one is the best and why? These are working fine.

public string GetString(int i)
{
    return "Testing number " + i.ToString();
}

//async methods where I'm confused with
public Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    return Task.FromResult<string>(GetString(i));
}
//Or
public Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    Task<string> task = new Task<string>(() => GetString(i));
    task.Start();
    return task;
}
//Or
public Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<string>();
    tcs.SetResult(GetString(i));
    return tcs.Task;
}

The caller will be

Task<string> task = SomeClass.GetStringAsync(9);
Console.WriteLine(task.Result);
//Or
var result = await SomeClass.GetStringAsync(9);
Console.WriteLine(result);

Thank you so much.

  • 2
    Your examples are completely unrealistic. Returning a string should be done synchronously, as per your first example. Without more complex payloads that actually require asynchronicity, this question doesn't make sense. Each one is "best" for a different scenario. You have one scenario. Returning a string synchronously. The answer here is the first (non-asynchronous) example in your question. – spender Sep 22 '16 at 14:38
  • @spender It's just a raw example. The real method returns huge varbinary/bytearray selected from colocation database server. – derodevil Sep 22 '16 at 15:19
  • Sure, but does it do this work synchronously or does it involve (most likely) async IO? How do you do this IO? or are you just looking to offload a synchronous task onto another thread? – spender Sep 22 '16 at 15:20
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you may not fully understand why anyone would want to use async. Async .Net allows the freeing up of threads that would normally be waiting on some external action to take place (network call or hard disk call). Normally windows uses I/O Completion Ports for these calls and has recently added async/await keywords to allow .Net access to native asynchronous calls. That being said there is a little overhead when using async as the runtime has to create a state-machine to keep track of a threads current state before assigning the await'd thread a new task.

Thus any async tasks that aren't using a I/O Completion Port are most likely doing more harm than good.

//async methods where I'm confused with
public Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    return Task.FromResult<string>(GetString(i));
}

Well let me correctly code this into an async method:

//async methods where I'm confused with
public async Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    return await Task.FromResult<string>(GetString(i));
}

Still bad, because there is no reason to use async; unless I'm mistaken about how Task.FromResult() works, this has additional overhead for no benefit.

I'm just going to rewrite them all as async and then give my understanding of what affect they have.

public async Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    Task<string> task = new Task<string>(() => GetString(i));
    await task.Start();
    return task;
}

It's extremely rare that you should be creating and starting your own tasks, it's not a good idea.

public Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<string>();
    tcs.SetResult(GetString(i));
    return tcs.Task;
}

The TaskCompletionSource was primarily designed to wrap current asynchronous into the async/await pattern. Since this isn't wrapping any type of asynchronous action there is no performance benefit.

public string GetString(int i)
{
    return "Testing number " + i.ToString();
}

This is your best bet. Don't use async/await unless you actually need to.

Stephen Cleary has a great set of Posts that talk about Tasks and Async, I highly recommend you read through it before diving into Async in .Net.

  • 2
    Excellent explanation – Fabjan Sep 22 '16 at 15:19
  • I think that return await Task.FromResult<string>(GetString(i)); will not do any extra work - because Task.FromResult<T> return already completed task. – Fabio Sep 23 '16 at 5:37
  • @Fabio I wouldn't say it doesn't do extra work, it still creates the task, sets the TaskOptions and such, but it doesn't appear to use the state-machine (nor really should it), so very little extra work (but I don't see any value in it). – Erik Philips Sep 23 '16 at 6:14
  • By extra work I mean it do not create state machine - only create TaskAwaiter and return completed Task. I agree that current examples have not benefit from using async, but there is examples of not IO processes which can benefit from using async approach. Raw examples - you can create own async method by using TaskCompletionSource for event driven behavior, where result of the task will be set only when correspondent event is raised. So in the consumer code it will look very simple await RunAndWaitForEventRaisedAsync() – Fabio Sep 23 '16 at 7:22
  • @Fabio agreed, my link to wrap current asyncronous... the guy demonstrates your comment awaiting mouse click events in a WPF application. Pretty interesting, not sure if I'd use it for that however. – Erik Philips Sep 23 '16 at 14:11

Actually, none of the above are correct.

public Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
{
    Task<string> task = new Task<string>(() => GetString(i));
    task.Start();
    return task;
}

should actually be:

public async Task<string> GetStringAsync(int i)
    {
        return await Task.Run(() => GetString(i));
    }

Note, in particular, the use of the "async" keyword (which enables the use of the "await" keyword; "await" is the equivalent of "come back to me when I have a result for you," see the documentation for details of the state machine that this creates). The examples you provide reflect an older way of doing task parallelism that is no longer a best practice.

An important note at this point: make sure it's the case that GetString is a CPU-bound task. There are several kinds of async methods: ones that run asynchronously in the same thread (which are primarily used for IO-bound tasks), ones that run in the thread pool (which are used primarily for CPU-bound tasks), and ones that shouldn't be async in the first place (things that are neither CPU-bound or IO-bound).

My standard illustration of this fact is as follows: suppose you go a restaurant with 10 people. When the waiter comes by, the first person he asks for his order isn't ready; however, the other 9 people are. Thus, the waiter asks the other 9 people for their orders and then comes back to the original guy hoping he'll be ready to order by then. (It's definitely not the case that they'll get a second waiter to wait for the original guy to be ready to order and doing so probably wouldn't save much time anyway). That's how async/await works in many cases (the exception being that some of the Task Parallel library calls, like Thread.Run(...), actually are executing on other threads - in our illustration, bringing in a second waiter - so make sure you check the documentation for which is which).

Thus, when you're using async/await, make sure you know whether something is CPU-bound (and therefore appropriate for executing on a separate thread), IO-bound (and therefore appropriate for asynchronous execution in the same thread), or neither (and therefore pointless to make async in the first place).

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.