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Is there a way in Python to sort a list where there are strings, floats and integers in it?

I tried to use list.sort() method but of course it did not work.

Here is an example of a list I would like to sort:

[2.0, True, [2, 3, 4, [3, [3, 4]], 5], "titi", 1]

I would like it to be sorted by value by floats and ints, and then by type: floats and ints first, then strings, then booleans and then lists. I would like to use Python 2.7 but I am not allowed to...

Expected output:

[1, 2.0, "titi", True, [2, 3, 4, [3, [3, 4]], 5]]
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    And how exactly would you want it to be sorted? – Teemu Risikko Sep 22 '16 at 14:59
  • Half-joking answer: switch to Python 2.7, where comparisons between integers and strings etc are allowed. – Kevin Sep 22 '16 at 14:59
  • As Teemu asks - what is your expected output? – Wayne Werner Sep 22 '16 at 15:02
  • I would like it to be sorted by value by floats and ints, and then by type : floats and ints first, then strings, then booleans and then lists. I would like to use Python 2.7 but I am not allowed to... – Silveris Sep 22 '16 at 15:02
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    So which one is greater, [2, 3, 4, [3, [3, 4]], 5]] or "titi"? – Antti Haapala Sep 22 '16 at 15:02
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Python's comparison operators wisely refuse to work for variables of incompatible types. Decide on the criterion for sorting your list, encapsulate it in a function and pass it as the key option to sort(). For example, to sort by the repr of each element (a string):

l.sort(key=repr)

To sort by type first, then by the contents:

l.sort(key=lambda x: (str(type(x)), x))

The latter has the advantage that numbers get sorted numerically, strings alphabetically, etc. It will still fail if there are two sublists that cannot be compared, but then you must decide what to do-- just extend your key function however you see fit.

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  • Glad to hear it, but note the disclaimer: It just pushes the problem down a step. You need to special-case it if you need to sort sublists with random contents. – alexis Sep 22 '16 at 15:09
  • @Wayne, go for it. But it might not match the OP's expectations. Who knows. – alexis Sep 22 '16 at 16:15
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The key-argument to list.sort or sorted can be used to sort it the way you need it, first you need to define how you want to order the types, easiest (and probably fastest) is a dictionary with types as keys and order as value

# define a dictionary that gives the ordering of the types
priority = {int: 0, float: 0, str: 1, bool: 2, list: 3}

To make this work one can use the fact that tuples and lists compare by first comparing the first element and if that is equal compare the second element, if that's equal compare the third (and so on).

# Define a function that converts the items to a tuple consisting of the priority
# and the actual value
def priority_item(item):
    return priority[type(item)], item

Finally you can sort your input, I'm going to shuffle it because it's already sorted (as far as I understand your question):

>>> l = [1, 2.0, "titi", True, [2, 3, 4, [3, [3, 4]], 5]]
>>> import random
>>> random.shuffle(l)
>>> print(l)
[True, [2, 3, 4, [3, [3, 4]], 5], 'titi', 2.0, 1]

>>> # Now sort it
>>> sorted(l, key=priority_item)
[1, 2.0, 'titi', True, [2, 3, 4, [3, [3, 4]], 5]]

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