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I am fighting the final boss of Rust, the borrow checker. This is a simplified version of a mio reactive network application I am working on. I spent too much time finding the right data structure for the task on hand. I want to register a connection while iterating over listening sockets that are able to accept new connections.

See the following code, or check it on the Rust playground. HashMap::get_mut returns a unique borrow to 1 value in 1 field of self, therefore I cannot pass on self to Thing::act. I understand why that happens, how that cause a run-time issue, but have no idea how to refactor the data structure to avoid such problems.

use std::collections::HashMap;

trait ThingSet {
    fn register(&mut self, thing: Box<Thing>);
}

trait Thing {
    fn act(&mut self, reg: &mut ThingSet);
}

struct Stream;

impl Thing for Stream {
    fn act(&mut self, reg: &mut ThingSet) {}
}

struct Listener;

impl Thing for Listener {
    fn act(&mut self, reg: &mut ThingSet) {
        if true {
            let mut stream = Stream {};
            reg.register(Box::new(stream));
        }
    }
}

struct Loop {
    next: usize,
    things: HashMap<usize, Box<Thing>>,
}

impl Loop {
    fn new() -> Loop {
        Loop { next: 1, things: HashMap::new(), }
    }
    fn run(&mut self) {
        let mut needs_action = Vec::<&mut Box<Thing>>::new();
        {
            // modeling a connection on one of the listeners...
            if let Some(t) = self.things.get_mut(&1usize) {
                needs_action.push(t);
            }
        }
        for t in needs_action {
            t.act(self as &mut ThingSet);
        }
    }
}

impl ThingSet for Loop {
    fn register(&mut self, thing: Box<Thing>) {
        self.things.insert(self.next, thing);
        self.next += 1;
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut l = Loop::new();
    let mut p1 = Listener {};
    let mut p2 = Listener {};
    l.register(Box::new(p1));
    l.register(Box::new(p2));
    l.run();
}

I could find good tutorials that explained what the borrow checker does and what is not allowed by it. I could not find good tutorials on how to find alternative data structures where I can avoid disallowed references.

Could you give advice how to remodel this specific problem?

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I think it's possible to correct this specific problem, but I feel there might be a more general concern here. Correct me if I am wrong, but it appears that you run Loop::run it will scan through your ThingSet then by some condition put a mutable reference to Thing on the needs_action buffer. The general issue here seems that through different iterations, rustc cannot verify that these different calls will give you a different mutable reference or another mutable reference to the same element. So you can enforce a run-time borrow check using something like a RefCell (see Jsor's answer), or you can take ownership from your ThingSet and replace what you've taken with something else -- or remove the element from the set all together.

For instance, taking ownership of the element and removing it from the ThingSet is illustrated here:

impl Loop {
    fn new() -> Loop {
        Loop { next: 1, things: HashMap::new(), }
    }
    fn run(&mut self) {
        let mut needs_action = Vec::<Box<Thing>>::new();

        // modeling a connection on one of the listeners...
        if let Some(t) = self.things.remove(&1usize) {
            needs_action.push(t);
        }

        for t in &mut needs_action {
            t.act(self as &mut ThingSet);
        }
    }
}
  • This is an option, but I think instead of a replace, better to just use remove from the HashMap and re-insert it if necessary. – LinearZoetrope Sep 22 '16 at 22:53
  • Ya, i should probably change that. – breeden Sep 22 '16 at 22:58
  • 1
    OK, so the idea here is that static analysis is not possible with this data structure, therefore Rc<RefCell<Thing>> will provide the same safety using runtime checks. – wigy Sep 23 '16 at 5:31
  • @wigy It's not so much that static analysis isn't possible, so much as Rust's borrow checker can't distinguish between a Box (or any other owned pointer) and a flat struct inside a data structure. – LinearZoetrope Sep 23 '16 at 10:05

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