25

I'm trying to use preg_match to validate that a time input is in this format - "HH:MM"

13 Answers 13

69

You can use regular expressions to check that.

for 12-hour:

preg_match("/^(?:1[012]|0[0-9]):[0-5][0-9]$/", $foo)

for 24-hour:

preg_match("/^(?:2[0-3]|[01][0-9]):[0-5][0-9]$/", $foo)

If you use a 24-hour clock going from 01:00 to 24:59, use

preg_match("/^(?:2[0-4]|[01][1-9]|10):([0-5][0-9])$/", $foo)
  • 12
    sorry, but really? reading this without a comment is bah. why not use something as simple as this: $dateObj = DateTime::createFromFormat('d.m.Y H:i', "10.10.2010 " .$timeStr); if ($dateObj !== false) { // valid time} else { //invalid time} but yeah, give +14 upvotes for reinventing the wheel – Toskan May 31 '14 at 2:21
  • 1
    @Toskan: I think that's a fine way to do it. I tried to follow the OP's request to use preg_match, even though I don't know the reasoning behind it. I know that I've asked questions before and had people tell me that I shouldn't do what I was asking to do (rather than tell me how to do it) and it bothered me -- of course I had a reason for asking for what I wanted. I don't know what this poster's reasoning is: maybe they're using GeSHi to format dates in their language and so DateTime::createFromFormat isn't available. Or maybe they're just learning regex. I don't know. – Charles May 31 '14 at 3:10
  • 1
    @Toskan My hosting service is out of date and DateTime object won't work, there. – Almino Melo Oct 22 '15 at 19:32
  • 3
    according to this 24:59 is a valid hour – themis Oct 14 '16 at 9:40
  • 1
    @themis The third regex intentionally allows this. The first two intentionally disallow this. – Charles Oct 14 '16 at 13:11
12

Let's imagine the time you want to check is $timeStr and has to be the format H:i according to the date specs. Using a regex for this is IMHO silly. This is so much easier to read:

UPDATED

$timeStr = " 02:00"; //example of valid time, note whitespace
test($timeStr);
$timeStr = "23:59"; //valid
test($timeStr);
$timeStr = "24:00"; //invalid
test($timeStr);
$timeStr = "25:00"; //invalid
test($timeStr);    
$timeStr = "16:61"; // invalid
test($timeStr);

//tests 23:59 hour format
    function test($timeStr){

    $dateObj = DateTime::createFromFormat('d.m.Y H:i', "10.10.2010 " . $timeStr);

    if ($dateObj !== false && $dateObj && $dateObj->format('G') == 
        intval($timeStr)){
        //return true;
        echo 'valid  <br/>';
    }
    else{
      //return false;
      echo 'invalid <br/>';
    }

}
  • 8
    Except according to this, 25:00 is a valid hour. – veksen Jul 24 '15 at 22:27
  • 1
    1 am of the next day, its a feature – Toskan Jan 15 '17 at 20:56
  • Create an offSet date and validate against it to remove inputs like 25:00. $dateObjOffset = DateTime::createFromFormat('d.m.Y H:i', "10.10.2010 " . '24:00'); if($dateObjOffset <= $dateObj){ return false; } – Lakshitha Udara Mar 30 '17 at 17:09
  • 1
    @LakshithaUdara good solution if for the case you want to have 24:00 as valid time, i added a solution for valid until 23:59 that is a bit simpler – Toskan Mar 31 '17 at 11:20
  • 1
    16:61 is also a valid hour. Also a feature, but perhaps not intended. – Herbert Van-Vliet Aug 5 '17 at 19:15
9

Simple function that validates a date (and/or time) without throwing exceptions. Just passing the format you expect to be:

function isValidDate($date, $format = 'Y-m-d') {
    $dateObj = DateTime::createFromFormat($format, $date);
    return $dateObj && $dateObj->format($format) == $date;
}

The $format parameter is important: it's used to convert the input String into a DateTime object and then convert the DateTime back to a String to be compared with the input one.

Some usage examples:

/* Valid Examples: */
isValidDate("2017-05-31");
isValidDate("23:15:00", 'H:i:s');
isValidDate("2017-05-31 11:15:00", 'Y-m-d h:i:s');

/* Invalid: */
isValidDate("2012-00-21");
isValidDate("25:15:00", 'H:i:s');
isValidDate("Any string that's not a valid date/time");
4

here is a code that check if the string is an hour between 00:00 and 23:59

$checked = false;
    if (preg_match('/^\d{2}:\d{2}$/', $str)) {
        if (preg_match("/(2[0-3]|[0][0-9]|1[0-9]):([0-5][0-9])/", $str)) {
            $checked = true;
        }
    }
    var_dump($checked );die;
  • This is matching 24:15 but not 10:15 – Toto May 17 '16 at 15:52
  • 1
    @Toto - Fixed check now – zion ben yacov May 18 '16 at 13:15
  • This is what I was looking for...thanks .. – sujal Jun 22 '17 at 12:01
2

You can do:

if(preg_match('/^(?:[01][0-9]|2[0-3]):[0-5][0-9]$/',$input)) {
        // $input is valid HH:MM format.
}
  • This would allow 24:59. That's not a valid time. Furthermore, why aren't you capturing the hour and minute? – Jason McCreary Oct 19 '10 at 2:57
  • 2
    console.log('24:59'.match(/^(?:[01][0-9]|2[0-3]):[0-5][0-9]$/)) will output null , this pattern not allow 24:59 – xenophon566 Aug 31 '16 at 7:11
2

For a 12-hour match that can do am and pm, use this

/^(1[0-2]|0?[1-9]):[0-5][0-9] (AM|PM)$/i

It will handle 01:20 am or 1:20 AM. The examples above for 12 hour were incorrect because you could potentially do:

00:20

which is not a valid 12 hour format.

1

Expanding on what @Toskan wrote, you could do this to validate in 00:00 format. Returns true if valid and between 00:00 and 23:59.

This also allows different time formats to be used...

function isTimeValid($time_str, $format = 'H:i')
{
    $DateTime = \DateTime::createFromFormat( "d/m/Y {$format}", "10/10/2010 {$time_str}" );
    return $DateTime && $DateTime->format( "d/m/Y {$format}" ) == "10/10/2010 {$time_str}";
}
0

If you aren't requiring preg_match, here is another novel method:

$thetime = "20:15" // set the time
$timecheck = explode(":", filter_var($thetime, FILTER_SANITIZE_URL));
$hourvalid = $minvalid = false;
if (count($timecheck) > 1 && count($timecheck) < 4) {
   $hourvalid = ((abs(filter_var($timecheck[0], FILTER_SANITIZE_NUMBER_INT)) < 24) 
                && (abs(filter_var($timecheck[0], FILTER_SANITIZE_NUMBER_INT)) === (INT) $timecheck[0]))
                ? true : false;
      $minvalid = ((abs(filter_var($timecheck[1], FILTER_SANITIZE_NUMBER_INT)) < 60) 
                && (abs(filter_var($timecheck[1], FILTER_SANITIZE_NUMBER_INT)) === (INT) $timecheck[1])) 
                ? true : false;
}

if ($hourvalid && $minvalid) {//valid time         
   echo $thetime . " is a valid time<br />";
} else {//invalid time
   echo $thetime . " is NOT a valid time<br />";
}

Probably not the most efficient method in the world, but it gets it done. Valid only for times from 00:00 to 23:59. Also, 8:0 validates as a time (assuming you would mean 08:00).

  • I wouldn't be sure about not-the-most-efficient, this is just comparing and type checking, this actually could be the most efficient way :) (though this is just microoptimalization, which is mostly not worth the effort) :) Also, I think FILTER_SANITIZE_URL is not needed. – jave.web Jul 11 '18 at 6:26
0

Corrected answer for @Toskan if you only want to validate HH:MM string

     protected function isValidTime($timeStr){

    $dateObj = DateTime::createFromFormat('d.m.Y H:i', "10.10.2010 " . $timeStr);
    $dateObjOffset = DateTime::createFromFormat('d.m.Y H:i', "10.10.2010 " . '24:00');

    if($dateObjOffset <= $dateObj){
        return false;
    }
    if ($dateObj !== false) {
       return true;
    }
    else{
       return false;
    }
}
0

Based on the Charles's elegant answer with regular expression. If you need a one line validation of both "HH:MM" and "H:MM" (i.e. "9:45"/"09:45") use the following regexp to match 24-hour format:

preg_match("/^(?(?=\d{2})(?:2[0-3]|[01][0-9])|[0-9]):[0-5][0-9]$/", $time)

Explanation

(? stands for conditional subpattern, the syntax is:

(?(condition)yes-pattern|no-pattern)

?= in condition is the regexp assertion

?: in yes-pattern is optional for better performance and you may drop it. This means we don't need any capturing within parentheses (), we need just alternatives feature.

So, we merely describe the following:

  1. If $time string begins with two digits (?=\d{2}), use (2[0-3]|[01][0-9]) pattern to match HH-hour notation ("09:45" case)
  2. otherwise use [0-9] pattern to match H-hour notation ("9:45" case)

UPDATE

As they say, simplicity is the sister of a talent. We don't necessarily need the condition pattern described above. The simpler validation of "HH:MM/H:MM" for 24-hour format:

preg_match("/^(?:2[0-3]|[01][0-9]|[0-9]):[0-5][0-9]$/", $time)

Again, ?: in grouping parentheses () is optional to disable capturing, you can drop it.

So, in this regexp the alternative subpatterns withing () is trying to match two digits hour at the first (20..23) and second (01..19) pattern, then one digit at the last third one (0..9).

In addition, the validation of "HH:MM/H:MM" for 12-hour format:

preg_match("/^(?:0?[1-9]|1[012]):[0-5][0-9]$/", $time);

Here, we're trying to match at first one digit (1..9) with possible preceding zero (0?), and then two digits (10..12).

0

If you're looking for seconds (24hour). This worked like a charm for me.

$time = "23:59:60";    
preg_match("/^([0-1][0-9]|2[0-3]):([0-5][0-9]):([0-5][0-9])$/", $time)
  • 23:59:60 shouldn't be a valid time... :\ – T30 Nov 1 '18 at 9:34
0

Function that validates hours, minutes and seconds, according to the desired format:

function validTime($time, $format='H:i:s') {
    $d = DateTime::createFromFormat("Y-m-d $format", "2017-12-01 $time");
    return $d && $d->format($format) == $time;
}

How to use:

$valid = validTime("23","H");
$valid = validTime("23:59","H:i");
$valid = validTime("23:59:59","H:i:s");
$valid = validTime("23:59:59");

valid = true

$valid = validTime("25","H");
$valid = validTime("01:60","H:i");
$valid = validTime("01:20:61","H:i:s");
$valid = validTime("01:20:61");

valid = false

  • You don't need to hardcode "Y-m-d" and "2017-12-01" there, it just makes it more complicated to understand and less flexible imo – T30 Nov 1 '18 at 9:32
-2

Another approch without using regex.

if(is_string($foo)  && (strlen($foo) == 4 || strlen($foo) == 5) && intval(str_replace(':','',$foo)) > -1 && intval(str_replace(':','',$foo)) < 2360){
    stuff to do if valid time
}
else{
    stuff to do if invalid time
}

First of all I check if the datatype is string. If not it obvious that it is not a valid time. Then I check if the string has the right lenght of 4 / 5 letters. With str_replace I remove the ':' and then cast the result to an integer which I could easily compare to the desired time range (in my example 00:00 - 23:59).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.