43

I've seen both of the following two styles of declaring opaque types in C APIs. Is there any clear advantage to using one style over the other?

Option 1

// foo.h
typedef struct foo * fooRef;
void doStuff(fooRef f);

// foo.c
struct foo {
    int x;
    int y;
};

Option 2

// foo.h
typedef struct _foo foo;
void doStuff(foo *f);

// foo.c
struct _foo {
    int x;
    int y;
};
  • 2
    See also Is it a good idea to typedef pointers? – Jonathan Leffler Jun 5 '16 at 22:26
  • 1
    Also note that names starting with an underscore are not a good idea in user code (as opposed to system code — the implementation). §7.1.3 "Reserved identifiers" of the standard: • All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use. • All identifiers that begin with an underscore are always reserved for use as identifiers with file scope in both the ordinary and tag name spaces. – Jonathan Leffler Jun 5 '16 at 22:29
  • Opaque type example – mihai Nov 15 '16 at 7:49
  • (A little late to the party, I know, but) I just proposed a full example as Option 1.5, here: stackoverflow.com/a/54488289/4561887. – Gabriel Staples Feb 1 at 23:09
69

My vote is for the third option that mouviciel posted then deleted:

I have seen a third way:

// foo.h
struct foo;
void doStuff(struct foo *f);

// foo.c
struct foo {
    int x;
    int y;
};

If you really can't stand typing the struct keyword, typedef struct foo foo; (note: get rid of the useless and problematic underscore) is acceptable. But whatever you do, never use typedef to define names for pointer types. It hides the extremely important piece of information that variables of this type reference an object which could be modified whenever you pass them to functions, and it makes dealing with differently-qualified (for instance, const-qualified) versions of the pointer a major pain.

  • 24
    +1 for don't hide pointers behind typedefs! (Or, even worse, arrays.) – Thomas Padron-McCarthy Oct 19 '10 at 4:48
  • 6
    'Never' is rather strong here: the whole point of opaque types is to hide the implementation from users of your api, making changes to the former independant of the latter, and providing a measure of safety by restricting direct modifications by the user; I see nothing wrong with aliasing pointer types or hiding qualifiers in such cases (ie if they are implementation details) – Christoph Oct 19 '10 at 8:08
  • 18
    Whether a type is a pointer or not is not an implementation detail. It's fundamental to the semantics of any operation in which you might use the type. This is one 'never' I stand by completely. – R.. Oct 19 '10 at 17:11
  • 11
    @R: Whether a type is a pointer or not absolutely is an implementation detail. Yes, being a pointer gives it certain semantics, but those semantics are not peculiar to pointers. If I expose a handle type from my library, and tell you that it persistently identifies a gadget, you do not, should not, and must not care if it is a pointer or an index into a private global array (or linked-list, to allow growth) inside my library, or magic. The only thing that matters is that it is properly documented as being an identifier for a persistent object. – Ben Voigt Dec 5 '10 at 1:08
  • 4
    @Eric: Top-level const gets removed from the actual parameter, so neither "const pointer to magic" nor "const magic" restrict the library in any way whatsoever. And whether it's a "pointer to const magic" or a "pointer to non-const magic" is an implementation detail... it's not important to the caller's code in the least, because he's not supposed to touch the magic, not even supposed to dereference the pointer which is a necessary first step in touching the magic. – Ben Voigt Dec 10 '10 at 4:03
1

bar(const fooRef) declares an immutable address as argument. bar(const foo *) declares an address of an immutable foo as argument.

For this reason, I tend to prefer option 2. I.e., the presented interface type is one where cv-ness can be specified at each level of indirection. Of course one can sidestep the option 1 library writer and just use foo, opening yourself to all sorts of horror when the library writer changes the implementation. (I.e., the option 1 library writer only perceives that fooRef is part of the invariant interface and that foo can come, go, be altered, whatever. The option 2 library writer perceives that foo is part of the invariant interface.)

I'm more surprised that no one's suggested combined typedef/struct constructions.
typedef struct { ... } foo;

  • 5
    Regarding your last sentence, these constructions do not admit opaque types. If you use them, you're exposing the definition of the structure in your header for the calling application to abuse. – R.. Oct 19 '10 at 4:36
  • In neither option is the layout of foo part of the interface. That's the whole point of doing things this way. – Ben Voigt Dec 5 '10 at 1:09
0

Option 1.5

I am accustomed to using Option 1, except where you name your reference with _h to signify it is a "handle" to a C-style "object" of this given C "class". Then, you ensure your function prototypes use const wherever the content of this object "handle" is an input only, and cannot be changed, and don't use const wherever the content can be changed.

Here's a full example:

//======================================================================================================================
// my_module.h
//======================================================================================================================

// An opaque pointer (handle) to a C-style "object" of "class" type "my_module" (struct my_module_s *, or my_module_h):
typedef struct my_module_s *my_module_h;

// Create a new "object" of "class" "my_module":
// A function that takes a *pointer to* an "object" handle, `malloc`s memory for a new copy of the opaque 
// `struct my_module_s`, then points the user's input handle (via its passed-in pointer) to this newly-created 
// "object" of "class" "my_module".
void my_module_open(my_module_h * my_module_h_p);

// A function that takes this "object" (via its handle) as an input only and cannot modify it
void my_module_do_stuff1(const my_module_h my_module);

// A function that can modify the private content of this "object" (via its handle) (but still cannot modify the 
// handle itself)
void my_module_do_stuff2(my_module_h my_module);

// Destroy the passed-in "object" of "class" type "my_module":
// A function that can close this object by stopping all operations, as required, and `free`ing its memory.
// `struct my_module_s`, then points the user's input handle (via its passed-in pointer) to this newly-created "object".
void my_module_close(my_module_h my_module);

//======================================================================================================================
// my_module.c
//======================================================================================================================

// Definition of the opaque struct "object" of C-style "class" "my_module".
// - NB: Since this is an opaque struct (declared in the header but not defined until the source file), it has the 
// following 2 important properties:
// 1) It permits data hiding, wherein you end up with the equivalent of a C++ "class" with only *private* member 
// variables.
// 2) Objects of this "class" can only be dynamically allocated. No static allocation is possible since any module
// including the header file does not know the contents of *nor the size of* (this is the critical part) this "class"
// (ie: C struct).
struct my_module_s
{
    int my_private_int1;
    int my_private_int2;
    float my_private_float;
    // etc. etc--add more "private" member variables as you see fit
}

void my_module_open(my_module_h * my_module_h_p)
{
    // Ensure the passed-in pointer is not NULL (since it is a core dump/segmentation fault to try to dereference 
    // a NULL pointer)
    if (!my_module_h_p)
    {
        // Print some error or store some error code here, and return it at the end of the function instead of 
        // returning void.
        goto done;
    }

    // Now allocate the actual memory for a new my_module C object from the heap, thereby dynamically creating this
    // C-style "object".
    my_module_h my_module; // Create a local object handle (pointer to a struct)
    my_module = malloc(sizeof(*my_module)); // Dynamically allocate memory for the full contents of the struct "object"
    if (!my_module) 
    {
        // Malloc failed due to out-of-memory. Print some error or store some error code here, and return it
        // at the end of the function instead of returning void.
        goto done;
    }

    // Initialize all memory to zero (OR just use `calloc()` instead of `malloc()` above!)
    memset(my_module, 0, sizeof(*my_module));

    // Now pass out this object to the user, and exit.
    *my_module_h_p = my_module;

done:
}

void my_module_do_stuff1(const my_module_h my_module)
{
    // Ensure my_module is not a NULL pointer.
    if (!my_module)
    {
        goto done;
    }

    // Do stuff where you use my_module private "member" variables.
    // Ex: use `my_module->my_private_int1` here, or `my_module->my_private_float`, etc. 

done:
}

void my_module_do_stuff2(my_module_h my_module)
{
    // Ensure my_module is not a NULL pointer.
    if (!my_module)
    {
        goto done;
    }

    // Do stuff where you use AND UPDATE my_module private "member" variables.
    // Ex:
    my_module->my_private_int1 = 7;
    my_module->my_private_float = 3.14159;
    // Etc.

done:
}

void my_module_close(my_module_h my_module)
{
    // Ensure my_module is not a NULL pointer.
    if (!my_module)
    {
        goto done;
    }

    free(my_module);

done:
}

The only improvements beyond this would be to:

  1. Implement full error handling and return the error instead of void. Ex:

    /// @brief my_module error codes
    typedef enum my_module_error_e
    {
        /// No error
        MY_MODULE_ERROR_OK = 0,
    
        /// Invalid Arguments (ex: NULL pointer passed in where a valid pointer is required)
        MY_MODULE_ERROR_INVARG,
    
        /// Out of memory
        MY_MODULE_ERROR_NOMEM,
    
        /// etc. etc.
        MY_MODULE_ERROR_PROBLEM1,
    } my_module_error_t;
    

    Now, instead of returning a void type in all of the functions above and below, return a my_module_error_t error type instead!

  2. Add a configuration struct called my_module_config_t to the .h file, and pass it in to the open function to update internal variables when you create a new object. Example:

    //--------------------
    // my_module.h
    //--------------------
    
    // my_module configuration struct
    typedef struct my_module_config_s
    {
        int my_config_param_int;
        float my_config_param_float;
    } my_module_config_t;
    
    my_module_error_t my_module_open(my_module_h * my_module_h_p, const my_module_config_t *config);
    
    //--------------------
    // my_module.c
    //--------------------
    
    my_module_error_t my_module_open(my_module_h * my_module_h_p, const my_module_config_t *config)
    {
        my_module_error_t err = MY_MODULE_ERROR_OK;
    
        // Ensure the passed-in pointer is not NULL (since it is a core dump/segmentation fault to try to dereference 
        // a NULL pointer)
        if (!my_module_h_p)
        {
            // Print some error or store some error code here, and return it at the end of the function instead of 
            // returning void. Ex:
            err = MY_MODULE_ERROR_INVARG;
            goto done;
        }
    
        // Now allocate the actual memory for a new my_module C object from the heap, thereby dynamically creating this
        // C-style "object".
        my_module_h my_module; // Create a local object handle (pointer to a struct)
        my_module = malloc(sizeof(*my_module)); // Dynamically allocate memory for the full contents of the struct "object"
        if (!my_module) 
        {
            // Malloc failed due to out-of-memory. Print some error or store some error code here, and return it
            // at the end of the function instead of returning void. Ex:
            err = MY_MODULE_ERROR_NOMEM;
            goto done;
        }
    
        // Initialize all memory to zero (OR just use `calloc()` instead of `malloc()` above!)
        memset(my_module, 0, sizeof(*my_module));
    
        // Now initialize the object with values per the config struct passed in.
        my_module->my_private_int1 = config->my_config_param_int;
        my_module->my_private_int2 = config->my_config_param_int*3/2;
        my_module->my_private_float = config->my_config_param_float;        
        // etc etc
    
        // Now pass out this object to the user, and exit.
        *my_module_h_p = my_module;
    
    done:
        return err;
    }
    

Additional reading on object-based C architecture:

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