1

I want to get the count of occurrence of a substring within a string.

My string is "hello hello hello". I want to get the number of times "hello hello" occurs in it, which in the above case is 2.
Can someone please help me find a regex for it?

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  • 5
    How did you get 3 in your example?
    – Kobi
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:17
  • Hello new user. I've edited your question and cleaned it up a little. I kept 3 in there, please edit it if it was a mistake, or explain it if it wasn't. Thanks, and welcome to stack overflow.
    – Kobi
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:26
  • 4
    If that "3" does not get explained or corrected, I will vote for close in an hour...
    – Thilo
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:36
  • 2
    It's either 2 or he meant to just count hello.
    – Ruel
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:49

5 Answers 5

2

Depending on either you want to count the number of occurrence of hello (which is 3 in your example) or hello hello (wich is 2), you can do:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use 5.10.1;
use warnings;
use strict;

my $str = q/hello hello hello/;
my $count1 =()= $str =~ /(?=\bhello hello\b)/g;
say $count1;  # gives 2

my $count2 =()= $str =~ /\bhello\b/g;
say $count2;  # gives 3
2

Try:

(?=hello hello)

Using a lookahead lets you find overlapping results. For whole word only, you may try:

\b(?=hello hello\b)

Example: http://rubular.com/r/om1xn1FmBI the blue positions mark a match

1

This is what you are looking for actually, Counting the occurrences of a substring - the fastest way.

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  • 2
    That does not work for overlapping substrings though.
    – Thilo
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:32
1

Assuming you meant "hello" and not "hello hello" , you can just split on hello. No need to construct extra regex

$string="hello hello blah hello blah helloworld hello blah blah hello";
@s = split "hello", $string, -1;
print scalar @s - 1 ."\n"; #get size of array
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  • 1
    Now, I'm no perl guy, but isn't /hello/ a regex? In that case, you might as well match against it. Also, note that the question asks about "hello hello", which suggests overlapping matches.
    – Kobi
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:29
  • Note that /hello/ is a regex, though :-)
    – Thilo
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:30
  • @Kobi: +1. While split can probably be done without a regex, overlapping would be a problem.
    – Thilo
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:32
  • and note that question also says 3. Unless the OP redefines that, whether is overlapping or not is pure guess work
    – ghostdog74
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:34
0
use strict;
use warning;
my $str = "hello hello hello bla bla hello bla hello";
my $count = grep /hello/ , split /\s+/,$str ;
print"$count"; #output 5
3
  • providing more general solution ie., first by splittig the string into words and then check by grep whether it is required word or not. Oct 19, 2010 at 5:37
  • 1
    how is assuming that matching only needs to be done on word boundaries more general? (especially since "hello hello" is not one word)
    – Thilo
    Oct 19, 2010 at 5:39
  • yes that's true, but i am considering "hello" as one word unless OP explain it more and split string into words because assuming that string may contain words other than "hello". Oct 19, 2010 at 5:55

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