12

I want to wrap a long word inside a div that passes the border of the div's parent into a new line.

I have tried the .wordwrap solution from this Accepted Answer, but it doesn't solve the problem.

Here is what I have tried:

#parent {
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
  border: solid 1px;
  position: relative;
}
#child {
  top: 20px;
  left: 300px;
  border: solid 1px;
  position: absolute;
}
.wordwrap {
  white-space: pre-wrap;
  /* CSS3 */
  white-space: -moz-pre-wrap;
  /* Firefox */
  white-space: -pre-wrap;
  /* Opera <7 */
  white-space: -o-pre-wrap;
  /* Opera 7 */
  word-wrap: break-word;
  /* IE */
}
<div id="parent">
  <div id="child" class="wordwrap">
    asfasfafafsafafasfasfafafasfadvaavasdvavdvsavsvasvsvs
  </div>
</div>

Here is the JsFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/yusrilmaulidanraji/otps5c66/5/

  • How about asfasfafafsafafasfasfafafasfad<wbr/>vaavasdvavdvsavsvasvsvs – mplungjan Sep 23 '16 at 9:18
  • @Yusril Maulidan Raji Don't forget to validate the correct answer that helped you – Weedoze Sep 26 '16 at 6:23
14

You don't need all those white-space

Instead use

.wordwrap { 
  word-break : break-all;
}

#parent {
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
  border: solid 1px;
  position: relative;
}
#child {
  top: 20px;
  left: 300px;
  border: solid 1px;
  position: absolute;
}
.wordwrap {
  word-break: break-all;
}
<div id="parent">
  <div id="child" class="wordwrap">
    asfasfafafsafafasfasfafafasfadvaavasdvavdvsavsvasvsvs
  </div>
</div>

You can also use

word-break : break-word

Check this Answer to see the difference

3

The element where you put the text have position: absolute. There is a couple of things you should know when using position: absolute in an element:

  • It'll by default only respect it's content width and height with a position different than absolute/fixed.

  • It'll not consume space in the parent element, so the structural size of the parent element will never be affected by it.

  • You can anchor an element with position: absolute in the nearest parent with other position than the default (static), with the css properties (top, right, bottom, left).

Therefore you should either remove the position absolute from that element, or since you are already using a left property, define a right property too (ie. right: 0;)

SNIPPET

#parent {
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
  border: solid 1px;
  position: relative;
}
#child {
  position: absolute;
  top: 20px;
  right: 0;
  left: 300px;
  border: solid 1px;
}
.wordwrap {
  white-space: pre-wrap;
  /* CSS3 */
  white-space: -moz-pre-wrap;
  /* Firefox */
  white-space: -pre-wrap;
  /* Opera <7 */
  white-space: -o-pre-wrap;
  /* Opera 7 */
  word-wrap: break-word
  /* IE */
}
<div id="parent">
  <div id="child" class="wordwrap">
    Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis...
  </div>
</div>

Update

If you don't want to compromise the absolute positioned #child div, by defining right: 0, which would also anchor it to the right side of the #parent div, based on Weedoze's answer, you can in fact use the property word-break: break-all;

However it has a downside, every word you have inside #child will automatically break no matter what size they have, even if they are inside a descendent element!

SNIPPET

#parent {
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
  border: solid 1px;
  position: relative;
}

#child {
  position: absolute;
  top: 20px;
  left: 300px;
  border: solid 1px;
  text-align: justify;
}

.wordwrap {
  white-space: pre-wrap;
  /* CSS3 */
  white-space: -moz-pre-wrap;
  /* Firefox */
  white-space: -pre-wrap;
  /* Opera <7 */
  white-space: -o-pre-wrap;
  /* Opera 7 */

  word-break: break-all;
}
<div id="parent">
  <div id="child" class="wordwrap">
    Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis...
    
    With word-break: break-all every word will be broken, even little ones! With word-break: break-all every word will be broken, even little ones! 
  </div>
</div>

I tested this one on Firefox and it worked! I couldn't test on Edge or IE because I'm running on Ubuntu and I don't have a virtual machine installed right now :)

But if you really don't want the little/normal words to be broken, nor a compromised right anchored #child, and of course if possible, then perhaps would be better to approach this layout with a different solution, Pugazh idea is not a bad start!

You could use float: left; max-width: calc(100% - 300px); and box-sizing: border-box; to get the same results, then using a super negative margin-bottom to pull the rest of #parent's content to the top. It's a bit hacky I know, probably there are better ways to get the same results, but this way you wouldn't need to use position: absolute nor word-break: break-all in #child)

SNIPPET

#parent {
  border: solid 1px;
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
}

#child {
  position: relative; /* not really needed, just to be on top for contrast */
  background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.9);
  text-align: justify;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  border: solid 1px;
  float: left;
  max-width: calc(100% - 300px);
  margin-top: 20px;
  margin-left: 300px;
  margin-bottom: -1000000%; /* Hack to pull #parent content to the top */
}

.wordwrap {
  white-space: pre-wrap;
  /* CSS3 */
  white-space: -moz-pre-wrap;
  /* Firefox */
  white-space: -pre-wrap;
  /* Opera <7 */
  white-space: -o-pre-wrap;
  /* Opera 7 */
  word-wrap: break-word;
  /* IE */
}
<div id="parent">
  <div id="child" class="wordwrap">
    Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis...
    
    And this little words will not get broken And this little words will not get broken And this little words will not get broken.
    
    Butgiantwordswilldefinitelybreakforsure!
  </div>
   
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content  
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content  
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content 
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content 
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content  
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content 
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content  
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content 
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content  
  This is some content This is some content This is some content This is some content 
  :)
</div>

  • Well, for the position:absolute, I can't remove it for some reasons. However, for the right:0px, it could be a strong option. Thanks! – Yusril Maulidan Raji Sep 23 '16 at 10:04
  • 1
    @YusrilMaulidanRaji - You don't need to specify a measure type (like px or %) when you're defining property with 0, since 0px is the same 0% or in any other measure type :) – Daniel Sep 23 '16 at 10:10
  • Didn't know that before. Thanks! :) – Yusril Maulidan Raji Sep 23 '16 at 10:11
  • @YusrilMaulidanRaji - Update! :) – Daniel Sep 23 '16 at 14:34
  • 1
    @Daniel 0px vs 0% is rather like "Is 0 octal or decimal?": Well, it's... it's 0. – cat Sep 23 '16 at 21:25
2

Instead of absolute positioning you can try margin. Check below example.

Updated fiddle

#parent {
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
  border: solid 1px;
  position: relative;
}
#child {
  margin-top: 20px;
  margin-left: 300px;
  border: solid 1px;
}
.wordwrap {
  white-space: pre-wrap;
  /* CSS3 */
  white-space: -moz-pre-wrap;
  /* Firefox */
  white-space: -pre-wrap;
  /* Opera <7 */
  white-space: -o-pre-wrap;
  /* Opera 7 */
  word-wrap: break-word;
  /* IE */
}
<div id="parent">
  <div id="child" class="wordwrap">
    asfasfafafsafafasfasfafafasfadvaavasdvavdvsavsvasvsvs
  </div>
</div>

  • 1
    while this seems to be an option, there might be a good reason the OP uses absolute positioning, so the least "destructive" option, I think, is @Weedoze's answer – webeno Sep 23 '16 at 9:22
  • Yup, I have to use the top-left properties for some reasons though. But thanks for the option! – Yusril Maulidan Raji Sep 23 '16 at 10:02
2

.wordwrap { 
  word-break : break-all;
}

#parent {
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
  border: solid 1px;
 }
#child {
  margin-top: 20px;
  margin-left: 300px;
  border: solid 1px;
}

<div id="parent">
  <div id="child" class="wordwrap">
    asfasfafafsafafasfasfafafasfadvaavasdvavdvsavsvasvsvs
  </div>
</div>

  • In this case it would be better to use break-word – Weedoze Sep 23 '16 at 9:27
  • yeah but in general case break-all is better – Rebecca Joanna Sep 23 '16 at 9:28
0

You should add this rules to your CSS:

#parent {
    overflow: hidden;
}

.wordwrap {
   white-space: no-wrap;
   text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

Cheers

  • Well, it has a different result though. The text instead is being overlapped by the outside border of the parent. The overlapped text should be wrapped to the newline though. – Yusril Maulidan Raji Sep 23 '16 at 9:35
0

you can try this code.

#parent {
        width: 500px;
        height: 500px;
        border: solid 1px;
        position: relative;
      }
      #child {
        margin-top: 20px;
        margin-left: 300px;
        border: solid 1px;
      }
      .word-wrap {
      white-space: pre-wrap;
      word-wrap: break-word;
    }
<body>
  <div id="parent">
    <div id="child" class="word-wrap">
      GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOD!
    </div>
  </div>
  </body>

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