66

I have a table of data and each cell is a link. I want to allow the user to click anywhere in the table cell and have them follow the link. Sometimes the table cells are more than one line but not always. I use td a {display: block} to get the link to cover most of the cell. When there is one cell in a row that is two lines and the others are only one line the one liners don't fill the entire vertical space of the table row. Here is the sample HTML and you can see it in action here http://www.jsfiddle.net/RXHuE/:

<head>
<style type="text/css">
  td {width: 200px}
  td a {display: block; height:100%; width:100%;}
  td a:hover {background-color: yellow;}
</style>
<title></title>
</head>
<body>
<table>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 1<br>
        second line</a>
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 2</a>
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 3</a>
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 4</a>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
</body>
  • +1 That's the first time I've heard about "display: table". – Aaron Digulla Oct 19 '10 at 7:13
  • Yeah, I tried using "display: inline-block", which actually worked in Webkit browsers but not firefox or IE. Then I read that "display: table" is similar so I thought I would give it a try and ended up posting the question with that. I have since edited the question to use "display: block" because that was my first idea. – Brian Fisher Oct 19 '10 at 7:17
  • I nearly ask the same question: stackoverflow.com/questions/9127274/… – Tim Büthe Feb 6 '12 at 10:57

10 Answers 10

44

You need a small change in your CSS. Making td height:100%; works for IE 8 and FF 3.6, but it doesn't work for Chrome.

td {
  width: 200px;
  border: solid 1px green;
  height: 100%
}
td a {
  display: block;
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
}

But making height to 50px works for Chrome in addition to IE and FF

td {
  width: 200px;
  border: solid 1px green;
  height: 50px
}
td a {
  display: block;
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
}

Edit:

You have given the solution yourself in another post here; which is to use display: inline-block;. This works when combined with my solution for Chrome, FF3.6, IE8

td {
  width: 200px;
  border: solid 1px green;
  height: 100%}
td a {
  display: inline-block;
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
}

Update

The following code is working for me in IE8, FF3.6 and chrome.

CSS

td {
  width: 200px;
  border: solid 1px green;
  height: 100%;
}
td a {
  display: inline-block;
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
}
td a:hover {
  background-color: yellow;
}

HTML

<table>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 1<br>
        second line</a>
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 2</a>
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 3</a>
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 4</a>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

The example lays here

|improve this answer|||||
  • Good suggestion, however, I don't want to fix the height of the cells. I'm basically displaying a table of data to the user and sometimes a row has a cell with lots of data causing it to wrap but sometimes there are no such cells in a row. – Brian Fisher Oct 19 '10 at 8:00
  • @Brian: Does making height 100% is also not feasible for you? – Gaurav Saxena Oct 19 '10 at 12:18
  • @Gaurav: I can make the the td's and links 100% height, I just don't want to give them a set height (otherwise they will sometimes be taller than they need to be). Also that would be hilarious if I had given the answer somewhere else :). – Brian Fisher Oct 19 '10 at 15:01
  • 1
    Hate to say it but zobier's answer below is THE answer to this issue. No need for JavaScript at all. – Ricardo Zea Apr 4 '13 at 18:01
  • 3
    Unfortunately, the example linked only works in quirks mode. Put <!DOCTYPE html> at the top of the document and it breaks. – Jez Aug 22 '13 at 13:40
103

Set an arbitrarily large negative margin and equal padding on the block element and overflow hidden on the parent.

td {
    overflow: hidden;
}
td a {
    display: block;
    margin: -10em;
    padding: 10em;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/RXHuE/213/

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    I like this one. I'm not using no JS. – mikato Nov 21 '13 at 23:27
  • 1
    Works great in current Firefox (27), Chrome (33) and IE (11). – Alex Mar 11 '14 at 11:14
  • 1
    Best solution. Also allows you to still vertically center the text, which other solutions seem to have problems with. The ONLY problem is that on Chrome for Android (and maybe other browsers too) when you tap a link the whole big link gets higlighted, including the parts outside the <a>. Fixable with -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); – Dirbaio Jul 31 '14 at 18:00
  • 4
    This is clever, but unfortunately breaks if you're using table cells for a responsive navigation, and you need dropdown menus from that navigation. – Matthew Dean Sep 23 '14 at 2:01
  • 4
    you dirty, dirty, sexy man. this is evilly genius and i love it. – Jason Sep 25 '14 at 5:21
3

Following hack works [Tested on Chrome / Firefox / Safari] Have the same padding for td and anchor elements. And for anchor also have margin which is equal to -ve of padding value.

HTML

<table>
    <tr>
        <td><a>Hello</a></td>
    </tr>
</table>

CSS:

td {                          
    background-color: yellow;                                                                              
    padding: 10px;                                                                                                            
}  
a {
    cursor:pointer;
    display:block;
    padding: 10px;
    margin: -10px;
}

Working Fiddle :http://jsfiddle.net/JasYz/

|improve this answer|||||
2

Little late to the party, but there's a nice solution I just discovered.

You can use a combination of relative and absolute positioned elements, along with a pseudo element to get the effect your going for. No extra markup needed!

Change the table cell (<td>), to be position: relative;, and create a ::before or ::after pseudo element on the <a> tag, and set it to position: absolute;, and also use top: 0; left: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0;.

Because the pseudo element is attached to the anchor tag, and you're telling it to take up the entire table cell, it will force the anchor tag to be at least that size, whilst not affecting the actual content of the anchor tag itself (thereby retaining its central alignment).

For example

HTML:

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>
      <a>I'm centralised</a>
    </td>
    <td>
      <a>I'm 100% width</a>
    </td>
    <td>
      <a>AND I'm 100% height</a>
    </td>
    <td>
      <a>WITHOUT extra markup</a>
    </td>
    <td>
      <a>OR JavaScript!</a>
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>

CSS:

table {
  border-collapse: collapse;
  table-layout: fixed;
}
td {
  position: relative;
  width: 150px;
  border: 2px solid red;
}
td a {
  padding: 0.5em 1em;
}
td a::after {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
}

Hope this helps!

|improve this answer|||||
  • This appears to stretch the clickable region but not extend the background color: i.imgur.com/NDO61sV.png – mpen Oct 13 '17 at 23:30
  • 2
    Apply the background color to the after element too... td a, td a:after { background-color: red; } – Jack_Hu Nov 29 '17 at 12:30
1

Try display: block:

td a {display: block; height:100%;}

[EDIT] WTF ... I can confirm this doesn't work in FF 4 and Chrome. This works:

td a {display: block;  height: 2.5em; border: 1px solid red;}

That suggests that height:100%; isn't defined in a table cell. Maybe this is because the cell gets its size from the content (so the content can't say "tell me your size" because that would lead to a loop). It doesn't even work if you set a height for the cells like so:

td {width: 200px; height: 3em; padding: 0px}

Again the code above will fail. So my suggestion is to use a defined height for the links (you can omit the width; that is 100% by default for block elements).

[EDIT2] I've clicked through a hundred examples at http://www.cssplay.co.uk/menus/ but none of them mix single line and multi-line cells. Seems like you hit a blind spot.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks for the suggestion. That is actually what I tried first and I changed the code in my post to use that. That allows the link to take up the entire horizontal space of the table cell, but not the vertical. – Brian Fisher Oct 19 '10 at 7:14
  • @Brian Fisher: Then something else is wrong. Add a border around the table cells and the links to see how big they really are. If the link is the only element in the cell and the cell has no padding, etc. height: 100%; should do the trick. – Aaron Digulla Oct 19 '10 at 7:17
  • @Brian: Or to put it another way: The cell should get the height from the link in the code above, so you can never have any space outside of the link. – Aaron Digulla Oct 19 '10 at 7:24
  • So I put a border around the cell, and it looks like the cell is not filling the entire height of the row. I tried putting height: 100% on the td but that didn't work. Any other thoughts? – Brian Fisher Oct 19 '10 at 7:32
  • It works for me if I fix the height of the td and just set the height of the td a to 100% in IE 8, FF3.6 and Chrome. I don't really want to fix the height of the td's because sometimes the rows will be 1, 2 or 3 lines depending on the content. WTF is awesome, I would give you plus 2 if I could. – Brian Fisher Oct 19 '10 at 8:11
1

I will post the same answer here, as I did on my own question.

Inspired by Jannis M's answer, I did the following:

$(document).ready(function(){    
    $('table tr').each(function(){
        var $row = $(this);
        var height = $row.height();
        $row.find('a').css('height', height).append('&nbsp;');  
    });       
});

I added a &nbsp; since empty links (not containing text nodes) can not be styled(?).

See my updated fiddle.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    You should check out Gaurav Saxena answer, it is a CSS only solution that works well on all current browsers. – Brian Fisher Feb 7 '12 at 19:58
0

You can use a little javascript.

  <td onclick="window.location='http://www.google.com/'">
    <a href="http://www.google.com/">Cell 3</a>
  </td>

Or, you can create an element which completely fills the cell (div, span, whatever) and wrap the around your big invisible element.

  <td>
    <a href="http://www.google.com/">
      <div style="width:100%; height:100%;">Cell 1<br>
      second line
      </div>
    </a>
  </td>
|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    I'm tempted to vote this down. Just because you can do something doesn't mean it's good to do it :-) – Aaron Digulla Oct 19 '10 at 7:11
  • Just because you can vote this down, doesn't mean it's good to :) While using javascript links can interfere with SEO, there's already a nice html link there; also, with a browser which doesn't support javascript, there will be a very minimal loss of functionality. – Sam Dufel Oct 19 '10 at 7:18
  • 2
    Your second suggestion isn't better: HTML doesn't allow to nest block elements inside of inline elements. The browser will try to make sense of it but in this case, the div will get the size from the link (which doesn't fill the cell). – Aaron Digulla Oct 19 '10 at 7:21
  • display: block is the correct, simple, cross-browser, valid solution. – Aaron Digulla Oct 19 '10 at 7:23
  • 2
    There are changes in HTML5 which makes it OK to have block elements inside of <a> elements. Second version would then be sort of ok - even though I prefer a cleaner CSS solution. – Joel Purra Feb 13 '13 at 20:49
0

Only problem here is that using display: block forces the browser to ignore the vertical align: center...

oops.

I jury rigged it to look right for one cell with height:60 and a font that occupied 20 pixels by adding a br... Then I realized that I had some items with 2-line text. Dang.

I ended up using the javascript. The javascript doesn't give the nice mousey pointy clicker thing, but the line of text does, so it will actually trigger a visual response, just not where I want it to... Then the Javascript will catch all the clicks that 'miss' the actual href.

Maybe not the most elegant solution, but it works well enough for now.

Now if I could only figure out how to do this the right way....

Any ideas on how to add the mouse icon change to a hand for the area covered by the onclick? Right now, the click to page works, but the icon only changes when it hits the href which only affects the text.

|improve this answer|||||
-1

Why don't you just get rid of the <a> altogheter and add an onClick to the <td> directly?

<head>
<style type="text/css">
td {
    text-align:center;
}
td:hover {
    cursor:pointer;
    color:#F00;
}
</style>
<title></title>
</head>
<body>
<table>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td onclick="location.href='http://www.google.com/';">Cell 1<br />second line</td>
            <td onclick="location.href='http://www.google.com/';">Cell 2</a></td>
            <td onclick="location.href='http://www.google.com/';">Cell 3</td>
            <td onclick="location.href='www.google.com';">Cell 4</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

This way you cut out the middle man.

PS: i know this was asked and answered many years ago, but none of the answers above solved the problem in my case. Hope this helps someone.

|improve this answer|||||
-1

For me the only solution is to replace <table> <tr> with <div>s and style them using display:table and display:table-row accordingly.

Then you can replace <td> with just <a> and style it with display:table-cell.

Work perfectly even on varying heights of <td> contents.

so original html without anchors:

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>content1<br>another_line</td>
    <td>content2</td>
  </tr>
</table>

now becomes:

a:hover
{
  background-color:#ccc;
}
    <div style="display:table; width:100%">
      <div  style="display:table-row">
        <a href="#" style="display:table-cell; border:solid 1px #f00">content1<br>another_line</a>
        <a href="#" style="display:table-cell; border:solid 1px #f00">content2</a>
      </div>
    </div>

|improve this answer|||||

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