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I want to present the repo owner with two distinct pull requests, the second based upon the first.

I have an existing pull request pending on a repo (that I do not own).

I want to base a further change on my existing pull request.

master -> A -> B

I made my the changes in B on a new branch in my fork based on the branch I used for A.

git branch -b B A

I have pushed upstream with:

git push --set-upstream origin B

When I try to create a pull request for B through the github UI it gives me the changes in A + the changes in B in a single pull request.

If I try this from the commandline:

hub pull-request -b A

It doesn't work because A is not a branch in the upstream repo, only in my fork.

What should I be doing differently in order to present the repo owner with two pull requests, one stacked upon the other?

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  • I tried to follow the steps here: graysonkoonce.com/… but his hub pull-request -b A doesn't work for me. Probably because he's not in a fork. – Thomas David Baker Sep 23 '16 at 14:08
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    Pull requests are meant to be accepted / rejected as a whole. What happens if the owner wants to reject the first PR and accept the second ? Maybe you should create a single PR instead? – Thibault J Sep 23 '16 at 14:12
  • Hm. I guess they can just click into the individual commits if they want to review sanely. So you think I just misunderstood what a pull request semantically is? It's ok to stack a ton of changes in a single pull request, ettiquette-wise? – Thomas David Baker Sep 23 '16 at 14:21
  • It's just that technically, if they depend on each other, you can't merge commits without merging the commits that come before then. Reviewing a feature that depends on some other feature that may not be accepted does not really make any sense, does it? – Thibault J Sep 24 '16 at 7:59
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    The situation here is that the first pull request contained some general refactoring like consistently using underscores in variable and function names. So the later change is dependent on those changes, but not really related to them. In any sane workflow I'd have the two things reviewed separately. – Thomas David Baker Sep 25 '16 at 7:27
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It's ok to stack a ton of changes in a single pull request, ettiquette-wise?

If your second change absolutely depend on the first one, then... yes.

That being said, you should resolve PR A first, meaning the maintainer of the original repo should evaluate, accept and merge your first PR.

In the meantime, you can make a new branch for B, based on A, and push that branch to your fork, but you should not make a new PR before the first is resolved.
Especially if the first PR is rejected.

In the OP's case:

I ended up treating all my stacked changes as one pull request and if they want to review sensibly they could click into each commit one by one

That makes sense when all those changes can be reviewed as one big new evolution.
The best practice recommends small incremental changes but in this instance, adding commit to an existing PR (since, indeed, there is no way to "stack PR") is the way to move forward with the development process.

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  • That sounds fairly reasonable. But I'd rather have a stack of changes waiting for them rather than me having to nice they've reviewed and merged and then send them the next. We're in different timezones and that could have resulted in us dancing back and forth for days. I ended up treating all my stacked changes as one pull request and if they want to review sensibly they could click into each commit one by one. I still think it'd be nice to be able to stack pull requests but I'm coming to see that it's not possible! Thanks! – Thomas David Baker Sep 25 '16 at 7:29
  • @ThomasDavidBaker your solution is perfectly good in your case. I have included your conclusion in the answer for more visibility. – VonC Sep 25 '16 at 7:43
  • Thanks. I don't really want to mark this as an accepted answer because the true answer is really "the ideal workflow is not supported by github". Plus I want to give someone a chance to swoop in with something better, should it exist. – Thomas David Baker Sep 25 '16 at 7:49

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