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I am the author of several C# libraries used by thousands of developers. I am constantly asked for custom implementations to enable edge cases. I have used the following approaches and each has their merits. Allow me to list them, if for no other reason so novice developers interested in extensibility might begin to see the patterns available to them.

Inheritance. I use abstract and virtual methods in an non-sealed class that developers can inherit from and override with their logic.

public class DefaultLibrary
{
    public virtual void MyMethod()
    {
        // default logic
    }
}

public class CustomLibrary : DefaultLibrary
{
    public override void MyMethod()
    {
        // custom logic
    }
}

Caveat> Sometimes the classes you write must be sealed. In fact, sealed is a nice default for your classes when you are writing libraries. In this case, you need to consider something else like...

Constructor injection. I have used optional construction parameters in a class enabling developers to pass in custom logic.

public interface IService
{
    void Process();
}

public class DefaultLibrary
{
    IService _service;
    public DefaultLibrary(IService service)
    {
        _service = service;
    }
    public virtual void MyMethod()
    {
        _service.Process();
    }
}

Caveat> Sometimes the classes you are writing need to maintain an internal state that requires them to be singletons (maintaining a single static instance). In this case, you need to consider something else like...

Property injection. I have used factory-like properties which developers can overwrite the default implementation of the class with their own logic.

public interface IService
{
    void Process();
}

public class DefaultLibrary
{
    public IService Service { get; set; }

    public virtual void MyMethod()
    {
        Service.Process();
    }
}

Caveat> Property injection is nice but behaves a lot like constructor injection in that it requires an interface and an implementation of that interface in a concrete class. Sometimes you simply want to allow developers to override a small implementation (a single method or two), much like inheritance (above) but without requiring a base.

This is the problem I am trying to solve.

I want an approach that feels more light-weight to the developer and doesn't introduce a bunch of new moving parts. So, I have landed on this. I would like to propose this approach. I have never used it and cannot defend its merits or pitfalls. For that reason, I am asking this question. Is this pattern reasonable, sensible, problematic, or a wonderful idea? It seems nice.

This pattern likely already has a name. I do not know it. Here's the gist:

public class CustomLibrary
{
    private void CallMyMethod()
    {
        MyMethod?.Invoke();
    }
    public Action MyMethod { get; set; }
}

Here's a full, sample implementation:

private async void CallSaveAsync(string value)
{
    if (RaiseBeforeSave(value))
    {
        await SaveAsync?.Invoke();
        RaiseAfterSave(value);
    }
}

private Func<Task> _saveAsync;
public Func<Task> SaveAsync
{
    get { return _saveAsync ?? DefaultSaveAsync; }
    set { _saveAsync = value; }
}

private async Task DefaultSaveAsync()
{
    await Task.CompletedTask;
}

The short of it? Methods are properties developers can over write.

From an API surface level, there really is no change. The developer still calls await class.SaveAsync() and it works as advertised. However, a developer now has the option to use class.SaveAsync = MyNewMethod without interrupting the internal logic that wraps the method with before and after events.

Acceptable downsides I see right away:

  1. I cannot use ref parameters
  2. I cannot use optional parameters
  3. I cannot use params parameters
  4. I cannot use method overrides

Aside from that I cannot see a dramatic problem with this approach. When the time is right for methods that require ref or optional I will have to change patterns. But why not write my libraries with all the candidate methods exactly like this? It's more code for me, sure. But I don't mind.

Thank you for taking the time.

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  • 1
    It appears to be the Strategy pattern. – jaco0646 Sep 23 '16 at 17:29
  • this is overly opinion based. – Daniel A. White Sep 23 '16 at 17:55
  • @DanielA.White Indeed. This question belongs to programmers.stackexchange.com - even though the target group might be reading it here. – Herdo Sep 23 '16 at 17:58
  • @jaco0646: Yes, but the strategy pattern has the obligatory Interface. If I understand this question correctly, the Interface is what the OP is trying to avoid. – Robert Harvey Sep 23 '16 at 18:09
  • @JerryNixon: This actually looks like a slightly more complex version of higher-order functions to me. What prevent you from simply exposing an Action<T> parameter, a Func<T> parameter, or even a Task<T> parameter to accomplish the same thing? – Robert Harvey Sep 23 '16 at 18:11
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It's a valid option, but it has a few drawbacks (as you already mention).

Apart from the ones you mention, there's also the fact that your methods can't be generic. (you can't have a Func<T><string, T> for example).

I would not suggest using properties though, that could get messy when different clients start writing to the properies. It creates shared state which can be very difficult to troubleshoot.

I'd rather go with constructor injection for those methods. Example

public class SomeClass
{
    readonly Func<string> _createId;
    public SomeClass() : this(null) {}
    public SomeClass(Func<string> createId)
    {
        _createId = createId ?? () => Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }

    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        var id = _createId();
        // do something
    }
}

In case you have a singleton-class, rather than setting up property injection, I'd create a configuration method, which does the same as the constructor in the above example. That makes it easier to see where these Funcs are being configured. Example:

public static class SomeClass
{
    static Func<string> _createId = () => Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    public static void Configure(Func<string> createId)
    {
        if(createId == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(createId));
        _createId = createId;
    }

    public static void SomeMethod()
    {
        var id = _createId();
        // do something
    }
}

Another option would be to ask for the Func in the method arguments.

public class SomeClass
{
    public void SomeMethod() => 
        SomeMethod(() => Guid.NewGuid().ToString())

    public void SomeMethod(Func<string> createId)
    {
        var id = createId();
        // do something
    }
}

It'll make it more cumbersome because the client will have to provide a Func every time he calls a method, but also more flexible and "simple" because now he can see at every call what will happen. This allows the developer to choose himself how he wants to configure his code organisation. He can pass in a different Func at every call (because they're always different), or he could choose to create a local variable and pass that in all the time (because it's always the same).

The above also works perfectly well with singletons.

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  • I think something like Configure() is a good alternative. – Jerry Nixon Sep 23 '16 at 19:20
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I think your solution is a nice one, but overengineered - as well having some issues.

Calling the base implementation - extensibility vs. allowing custom implementations

Given your solution, it would be a pain to execute the initial/base logic. Given your scenario:

private async void CallSaveAsync(string value)
{
    if (RaiseBeforeSave(value))
    {
        await SaveAsync?.Invoke();
        RaiseAfterSave(value);
    }
}

private Func<Task> _saveAsync;
public Func<Task> SaveAsync
{
    get { return _saveAsync ?? DefaultSaveAsync; }
    set { _saveAsync = value; }
}

private async Task DefaultSaveAsync()
{
    // Complete and return a fancy default task, like - actually saving stuff
}

Providing a custom implementation

Let me assume I want to use a custom implementation:

// ExecuteCustomSave being a method with matching signature
FancyClass.SaveAsync = ExecuteCustomSave;
await FancyClass.SaveAsync();

In this case, the custom implementation would be executed - just fine. Therefore, the solution you provided is a nice approach.


Providing an extensibility option

Now let's assume I want to make use of some extensibility:

FancyClass.SaveAsync = ExecuteCustomSave;
await FancyClass.SaveAsync(); // FancyClass.DefaultSaveAsync is not being called

To make a call of DefaultSaveAsync happen, one would have to write something like this:

await FancyClass.SaveAsync();
FancyClass.SaveAsync = ExecuteCustomSave;
await FancyClass.SaveAsync();

Or even this, depending on the required execution order:

FancyClass.SaveAsync = ExecuteCustomSave;
await FancyClass.SaveAsync();
FancyClass.SaveAsync = null;
await FancyClass.SaveAsync();

Maintaining the usability of the custom logic

As you have written in your question, you want to be able to provide extensibility for static classes as well - correct me if I misunderstood this.

Let's take a look at this scenario (even though it's constructed):

// Let's assume the class is static this time
public static class FancyClass
{ [...] }

public class MyAwesomeExtension : IDisposable
{
    public MyAwesomeExtension()
    {
        // Override SaveAsync with custom logic
        FancyClass.SaveAsync = Save;
    }

    public async Task Save()
    {
        // Do something, might throw if in disposed state
    }

    // Implement IDisposable
}

public class SomeOtherClass
{
    public async Task SaveAllChanges()
    {
        await FancyClass.SaveAsync().ConfigureAwait(false);
    }
}

The FancyClass would call the provided Func<Task>, without knowing what state the provider of this method is in. IMHO, this is a very dangerous thing to do - assuming the method provider would still do all the work it's supposed to do.


Conclusion

Is this pattern reasonable, sensible, problematic, or a wonderful idea?

In terms of usability, this pattern definitely has its downsides.
As written above, you'd limit any library consumers the way he could use your library. If only creating the possibility for consumers to provide an override, even for static and sealed classes, your solution is fine. However, the limitations you already mentioned, as well as those others have mentioned, are overweighting the benefits of this solution. The possible ways a custom implementation could be provided are limited.

In terms of economic efficiency, this pattern is not a very pleasent one.
The additional work required to create, modify and maintain a library would be a medium to huge impact on the work load. In a professional manner, I'd apply the KISS principle - as library provider it's not your task to provide extensibility. There are more than enough patterns out there to handle this, on the consuming side.

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