61

I'm using Xcode 8 and Swift 3.0. What does this error message mean?

ld: warning: Some object files have incompatible Objective-C category definitions. Some category metadata may be lost. All files containing Objective-C categories should be built using the same compiler.

6
  • Thanks. I actually saw those before posting. No answers in them.
    – jherg
    Sep 23, 2016 at 17:52
  • Have you expanded the warning message? Usually there is an icon on the far right of the line that will expand the message and let you see the command line calls and results.
    – Mobile Ben
    Sep 24, 2016 at 5:33
  • @MobileBen yes, thanks. I'm not seeing anything helpful in there.
    – jherg
    Sep 26, 2016 at 15:47
  • 2
    Just got this... nothing posted here works :/ Dec 3, 2016 at 4:04

8 Answers 8

40

I also had this issue in a UIColor extension, my app is entirely made with swift except for some frameworks that use Objective-c so I have no problem in declaring the var as @nonobjc:

extension UIColor {
   @nonobjc static var lol: UIColor {
      return UIColor.red
   }
}

From the apple docs:

The nonobjc attribute tells the compiler to make the declaration unavailable in Objective-C code...

Since this code is unavailable to Objective-C the warning disappears.

2
  • 4
    I had to add @nonobjc to all class and static variables in all extensions used in my target. Only after that warning disappeared.
    – slamor
    Dec 14, 2016 at 22:24
  • Damn I tried to use a regex to find all extensions with static properties, but Xcode 💩 itself
    – RyanM
    Apr 28, 2017 at 19:07
22

In my case, the reason was having computed type property in an extension:

extension NSParagraphStyle {
    class var defaultStyle: NSParagraphStyle {
        return ...
    }
}

Not sure what the exact reason behind this is, but to get rid of the warning I had to convert the computed type property (class var) to a type method (class func):

extension NSParagraphStyle {
    class func defaultStyle() -> NSParagraphStyle {
        return ...
    }
}
6
  • 1
    I'm trying to use an extensio to UIColor to have my own set of colors. Do they have to be functions? In previous versions of Swift you had UIColor.whiteColor(), but now it is UIColor.white. I want to have UIColor.myColor. Any idea how to achieve that? Oct 13, 2016 at 13:23
  • You can ignore the warning if you want and everything should work fine. But not sure if you can use that property from ObjC code though.
    – Hejazi
    Oct 13, 2016 at 13:32
  • @Hejazi is there a way to suppress this warning? or by saying ignore the warning you mean just pretend you don't see it?
    – Ismail
    Oct 13, 2016 at 13:39
  • @Ismail AFAIK, there is no way to suppress warnings in Swift. I meant you can just ignore this warning for the time being (until Apple fixes what appears to be a swift compiler bug), or use type methods instead of computed type properties as I said before.
    – Hejazi
    Oct 13, 2016 at 14:00
  • 1
    I was seeing this warning and found this answer. I was skeptical that it would work for me because the warning seems to have nothing to do with the answer, but the answer fixed the warning.
    – Josh Adams
    Oct 31, 2016 at 14:00
10

This warning appeared in my project after adding a framework that used Objective-C in my application that otherwise used Swift 3 entirely.

By declaring all static functions and static variables in all extensions as @nonobjc this warning went away.

For example

extension Notification.Name {
    @nonobjc static let MyNotificationName = Notification.Name("NNSongFavoriteStatusDidChangeNotification")
}

or

extension UIColor {
    @nonobjc static let superGiantRed = UIColor(red: 180.0/255.0, green: 40.0/255.0, blue: 27.0/255.0, alpha: 1.0)
}
9

Google Analytics pod

In Build Settings -> Other Linker Flags if you have the -ObjC on -l"GoogleAnalytics" flag this warning will appear. I don`t know why or how to resolve, but can be your problem too.

2
  • 1
    @Raniys No my friend, I think this will be resolved when google update theirs repository. If you delete the -ObjC flag the warning go away, But I dont know the problems that can cause your project Nov 30, 2016 at 12:05
  • @Raniys hello my friend, i had notice that after my pod install, this warning appeared "[!] The project[Debug] target overrides the ALWAYS_EMBED_SWIFT_STANDARD_LIBRARIES build setting defined in `podsFolder.xcconfig'. This can lead to problems with the CocoaPods installation". When i corrected this warning, in my build settings, the XCode warning is gone. Mar 17, 2017 at 11:46
5

In my case it was a class variable.

public extension NSObject {
    public class var nameOfClass: String{
        return NSStringFromClass(self).components(separatedBy: ".").last!
    }

Adding @nonobjc helped.

4

For me the issue was that I was using a third-party framework from a vendor built with Xcode 7 in my Swift 3 application built with Xcode 8. Because the framework was a compiled binary, the only option I had was to ask my vendor for a new framework built with the latest version of Xcode.

5
  • Can you tell us which library it was?
    – allaire
    Nov 3, 2016 at 11:59
  • @allaire It was a proprietary SDK from Adobe.
    – JAL
    Nov 3, 2016 at 12:38
  • Ahh too bad. I'm facing a similar issue, but I don't have the motivation to remove pod one by one :(
    – allaire
    Nov 3, 2016 at 15:01
  • 1
    @allaire This issue should only occur with pre-built frameworks. If you have the source code for any of your cocoapods (the pod is built from the source), you can rule those out, since you know they're being built with the latest version of Xcode that you are using
    – JAL
    Nov 3, 2016 at 16:27
  • I suspect static libraries in Cocoapods (like Google Analytics)
    – allaire
    Nov 4, 2016 at 15:17
1

I was able to solve my problem when I changed the "class var" to "class func":

There was:

class var applicationVersionNumber: String {
    if let version = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
        return version
    }
    return "Version Number Not Available"
}

Has become:

class func applicationVersionNumber() -> String {
    if let version = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
        return version
    }
    return "Version Number Not Available"
}

Source: https://forums.developer.apple.com/message/146579#146579

0

Rather than marking each member as @nonobjc individually, you can instead mark the entire extension as @nonobjc:

@nonobjc extension UIStoryboard {
  static let main = UIStoryboard(name: "Main", bundle: nil)
  static let welcome = UIStoryboard(name: "Main", bundle: nil)
}

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