0

I am an MySQL newbie who's learning about transactions, and I'm using the InnoDB engine.

In the MySQL reference manual, I see that they ask to set autocommit to 0 before starting a transaction, but in both ways (setting it to either 0 or 1) I see the same behavior: the transaction is validated after commit and invalidated with Rollback. What is the difference between setting autocommit to 0 or to 1??

1

If autocommit is on, then every query you issue effectively runs like this:

start transaction;
...do a query ...
commit;
start transaction;
... do another query ...
commit
etc...

with autocommit off, there's no automatic transaction, and you start it yourself, which makes the code run like this:

start transaction
...do a query ...
...do another query ...
... etc...
commit;

If you only ever issue single command queries, then there's not much of a difference in behaviors. it's only when you start issuing multiple sequential queries that the new behavior really kicks in.

  • i have queries like this : start transaction ...do a query ... ...do another query ... ... etc... commit; i just want know what is the difference between setting autocommit to 0 or to 1 before starting the transaction. – aaa bbb Sep 23 '16 at 17:46
1

There are 3 modes:

  • autocommit=1 (or ON): Each statement is a transaction. (See Marc's answer)

  • autocommit=0 (or OFF): You must eventually issue COMMIT, else changes will be lost. (I see this modes a too error prone to ever use.)

  • BEGIN (or START TRANSACTION) ... COMMIT (or ROLLBACK): This explicitly spells out the extent of the transaction. autocommit is ignored. I consider this to be 'best practice'

0

I think if you use MyISAM storage engine you must set autocommit to 0 but with InnoDB ints not necessary because start transaction sets autocommit to 0 LINK

  • 3
    myisam doesn't have transactions, period, so autocommit is ignored – Marc B Sep 23 '16 at 17:49
  • MyISAM doesn't care about a lot of things, like data integrity, performance, or most of all, transactions. – tadman Sep 23 '16 at 18:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.