5

So if I have something like this:

 if (a>b)
      return true;

and I decide later that I want to change it to this:

if (a>b)
{
     a++;
     return true;
}

Is there a quicker way to have the existing code under the if statement go directly into the newly made curly braces? Because currently if I were to add the curly braces after creating the if statement in the first example I'd have to cut the "return true" from under the new braces and paste it between the newly made curly braces. This is what it looks like:

if (a>b)
{
}
return true;

and it's pretty annoying. Is there a fix to this or do we have to manually copy and paste the existing line in between the brackets?

P.S. I'm using Microsoft Visual Studio 2015 ver 3 and programming in c# but I think this problem occurs in other languages too like c++.

6

Highlight the code and then press Alt + Up Arrow. Move code down with Alt + Down Arrow. Works with multiple lines too. Plus, you don't have to highlight the entire line. As long as one character is highlighted, it works.

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/zainnab/2013/07/01/visual-studio-2013-preview-moving-lines-of-code/

  • Dude. You rule. – Jakotheshadows Sep 23 '16 at 20:09
  • This is much better than what I was doing before thanks! – Capn Jack Sep 23 '16 at 20:56
0

I'm not aware of a faster way, but you might try adding the bottom brace first, and then the top brace next to the if. The only problem with this is that it will automatically format the bottom brace you're adding unless you go back and delete and add it after the fact.

The other option, which may not be much of a shortcut, is to highlight "return true", right click for the context menu and select "surround with" and select if (or while, or for.) This will create the block and move the cursor so you can enter the condition. (Hot Key Chord is Ctrl+K,Ctrl+S.)

0

Some options:

  • Use R#. Then when you're about to add the a++;, first type an opening brace with the cursor just before the 'r' of return and it will add the closing brace for you, and when you then hit Enter you're ready to type a++;. Just 1 or 2 keystrokes depending on what you want. (This is configurable in R# so your mileage will depend on that).

  • Subjective perhaps, but this is one of the good reasons to not write code like the original in the first place, and to instead use braces for even a single statement block. If that's too unpalatable for you, put single statements on the same line as the if()

0

Alex has a great answer. Alternatively, if you don't want to move code into an if after creating it, then you can also highlight the code you want in the body. Then press ctrl + K, S (Or find 'Surround with' in the right click menu), type if, and hit enter.

This will create an if statement and embed your highlighted code in the body of the if.

0

MissingBraces extension lets you add if/else/for/foreach braces as a Quick Action.

  • would you mind elaborating on this? I don't know what a quick action is or how MissingBraces works. Sorry for the noobiness but this sounds kinda cool it might be what I'm looking for. – Capn Jack Sep 25 '16 at 20:11
  • @CapnJack Have you visited visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/… ? – Sergey Vlasov Sep 26 '16 at 3:14
  • Yeah I just clicked your hyper link it told me all I needed, thanks it works well :) – Capn Jack Sep 27 '16 at 20:50

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