5

I've a function that looks something like this -

std::string func()
{
    std::string result;

    ...

    auto seed = std::random_device()();
    std::mt19937 gen(seed);
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dis(0, 61);

    ...
    return result;
}

which compiles fine across variety of compilers and their versions, but still fails to pass the valgrind test on Ubuntu. I explicitly mentioned ubuntu because it passes successfully on my machine which has Arch Linux installation.

Both valgrind installations report their version as valgrind-3.11.0 and the only difference is Arch Linux installation is on my machine with no virtualization, while Ubuntu tests have been done on DO/CI servers which probably are under some kind of virtualization. But should that matter?


Here is the log for valgrind run -

 --- stderr ---
==13849== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==13849== Copyright (C) 2002-2015, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==13849== Using Valgrind-3.11.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==13849== Command: file/path/here
==13849== 
vex amd64->IR: unhandled instruction bytes: 0xF 0xC7 0xF0 0x89 0x6 0xF 0x42 0xC1
vex amd64->IR:   REX=0 REX.W=0 REX.R=0 REX.X=0 REX.B=0
vex amd64->IR:   VEX=0 VEX.L=0 VEX.nVVVV=0x0 ESC=0F
vex amd64->IR:   PFX.66=0 PFX.F2=0 PFX.F3=0
==13849== valgrind: Unrecognised instruction at address 0x5111715.
==13849==    at 0x5111715: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.22)
==13849==    by 0x51118B1: std::random_device::_M_getval() (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.22)
==13849==    by 0x4809FB: std::random_device::operator()() (random.h:1612)
==13849==    by 0x47F0C2: isaac::deviceList::genId[abi:cxx11](unsigned int) (deviceList.cpp:21)
==13849==    by 0x47F2A7: isaac::deviceList::place(isaac::deviceType, nlohmann::basic_json<std::map, std::vector, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, bool, long, unsigned long, double, std::allocator>) (deviceList.cpp:38)
==13849==    by 0x40D06E: DeviceList_place_Test::TestBody() (test.cpp:194)
==13849==    by 0x45D5A7: void testing::internal::HandleSehExceptionsInMethodIfSupported<testing::Test, void>(testing::Test*, void (testing::Test::*)(), char const*) (gtest.cc:2078)
==13849==    by 0x4588D2: void testing::internal::HandleExceptionsInMethodIfSupported<testing::Test, void>(testing::Test*, void (testing::Test::*)(), char const*) (gtest.cc:2114)
==13849==    by 0x43EBB3: testing::Test::Run() (gtest.cc:2151)
==13849==    by 0x43F3F5: testing::TestInfo::Run() (gtest.cc:2326)
==13849==    by 0x43FA52: testing::TestCase::Run() (gtest.cc:2444)
==13849==    by 0x446911: testing::internal::UnitTestImpl::RunAllTests() (gtest.cc:4315)
==13849== Your program just tried to execute an instruction that Valgrind
==13849== did not recognise.  There are two possible reasons for this.
==13849== 1. Your program has a bug and erroneously jumped to a non-code
==13849==    location.  If you are running Memcheck and you just saw a
==13849==    warning about a bad jump, it's probably your program's fault.
==13849== 2. The instruction is legitimate but Valgrind doesn't handle it,
==13849==    i.e. it's Valgrind's fault.  If you think this is the case or
==13849==    you are not sure, please let us know and we'll try to fix it.
==13849== Either way, Valgrind will now raise a SIGILL signal which will
==13849== probably kill your program.
==13849== 
==13849== Process terminating with default action of signal 4 (SIGILL): dumping core
==13849==  Illegal opcode at address 0x5111715
==13849==    at 0x5111715: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.22)
==13849==    by 0x51118B1: std::random_device::_M_getval() (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.22)
==13849==    by 0x4809FB: std::random_device::operator()() (random.h:1612)
==13849==    by 0x47F0C2: isaac::deviceList::genId[abi:cxx11](unsigned int) (deviceList.cpp:21)
==13849==    by 0x47F2A7: isaac::deviceList::place(isaac::deviceType, nlohmann::basic_json<std::map, std::vector, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, bool, long, unsigned long, double, std::allocator>) (deviceList.cpp:38)
==13849==    by 0x40D06E: DeviceList_place_Test::TestBody() (test.cpp:194)
==13849==    by 0x45D5A7: void testing::internal::HandleSehExceptionsInMethodIfSupported<testing::Test, void>(testing::Test*, void (testing::Test::*)(), char const*) (gtest.cc:2078)
==13849==    by 0x4588D2: void testing::internal::HandleExceptionsInMethodIfSupported<testing::Test, void>(testing::Test*, void (testing::Test::*)(), char const*) (gtest.cc:2114)
==13849==    by 0x43EBB3: testing::Test::Run() (gtest.cc:2151)
==13849==    by 0x43F3F5: testing::TestInfo::Run() (gtest.cc:2326)
==13849==    by 0x43FA52: testing::TestCase::Run() (gtest.cc:2444)
==13849==    by 0x446911: testing::internal::UnitTestImpl::RunAllTests() (gtest.cc:4315)
==13849== 
==13849== HEAP SUMMARY:
==13849==     in use at exit: 84,300 bytes in 108 blocks
==13849==   total heap usage: 622 allocs, 514 frees, 530,112 bytes allocated
==13849== 
==13849== LEAK SUMMARY:
==13849==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==13849==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==13849==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==13849==    still reachable: 84,300 bytes in 108 blocks
==13849==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==13849== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==13849== 
==13849== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==13849== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 0 from 0)
-------

EDIT - I've also tried manually building valgrind from official source and installing it, however still produces the same error.

  • 1
    What compiler flags did you use on the Ubuntu machine? Obviously, the compiler is generating an illegal instruction. What is the output of /proc/cpuinfo on the Ubuntu machine? – Martin Nyolt Sep 24 '16 at 7:05
  • @MartinNyolt both builds have same flags, ubuntu /proc/cpuinfo - gist.github.com/agauniyal/c8d57b106097a16296b259b86fc93368 – Abhinav Gauniyal Sep 24 '16 at 7:08
  • 1
    But what flags exactly? I am helping you to find out why your compiler generates an illegal instruction. Did you debug the code and check which instruction it tries to execute? Is the error only occurring during valgrind, or do you get a SIGILL also during a normal execution? – Martin Nyolt Sep 24 '16 at 7:33
  • 1
    @MartinNyolt the error doesn't shows up during compilation or execution of that program, only under valgrind execution. Here are all the flags that my build system is passing - "c++ '-Ibenchmark/randIdGen@exe' '-fdiagnostics-color=always' '-I../benchmark' '-Ibenchmark' '-pipe' '-Wall' '-Wpedantic' '-Wextra' '-Winvalid-pch' '-Wnon-virtual-dtor' '-std=c++14' '-O0' '-g' '-MMD' '-MQ' 'benchmark/randIdGen@exe/randomIdGen.cpp.o' '-MF' 'benchmark/randIdGen@exe/randomIdGen.cpp.o.d' -o 'benchmark/randIdGen@exe/randomIdGen.cpp.o' -c ../benchmark/randomIdGen.cpp" – Abhinav Gauniyal Sep 24 '16 at 7:42
  • @MartinNyolt "Did you debug the code and check which instruction it tries to execute?" Valgrind is a debugger, and yes, the instruction is already in the question: "vex amd64->IR: unhandled instruction bytes: 0xF 0xC7 0xF0 0x89 0x6 0xF 0x42 0xC1" – autistic Sep 24 '16 at 12:08
4

It looks like your Ubuntu system has a random number library which uses the RDRAND instruction (opcode 0x0f 0xc7) which your version of Valgrind does not recognise. Your Arch system evidently uses a different implementation which does not take advantage of this instruction.

You may be able to work around this by re-compiling for a pre-Ivy Bridge CPU.

  • re-compiling as in compiling on my system, then downloading that binary on CI builds and running valgrind on it? – Abhinav Gauniyal Sep 24 '16 at 7:46
  • 1
    It looks like the instruction is in your libstdc++ library, so I guess you might need to re-compile that. You could also check to see whether this is a known problem wih valgrind and see if there are any patches to fix it. – Paul R Sep 24 '16 at 7:48
  • hmm, can't I statically link to it instead? Recompiling libstdc++ library doesn't seems to be a day's task for me :p – Abhinav Gauniyal Sep 24 '16 at 7:50
  • You could also check the library source to see if there are any compile-time or run-rime switches which would enable you to avoid this instruction. – Paul R Sep 24 '16 at 7:53
7

See https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=353370.

Getting/compiling last svn version should solve this problem.

If not, please report this on bugzilla, as the 3.12 release will soon be produced. Thanks

  • 1
    I forgot to comment but it did solve my problem :) – Abhinav Gauniyal Dec 22 '16 at 15:09

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