9

The problem is to find the minimum number of squares required to sum to a number n.

Some examples:

min[ 1] = 1 (1²)
min[ 2] = 2 (1² + 1²)
min[ 4] = 1 (2²)
min[13] = 2 (3² + 2²)

I'm aware of Lagrange's four-square theorem which states that any natural number can be represented as the sum of four squares.

I'm trying to solve this using DP.

This is what I came up with (its not correct)

min[i] = 1 where i is a square number
min[i] = min(min[i - 1] + 1, 1 + min[i - prev]) where prev is a square number < i

What is the correct DP way to solve this?

14

I'm not sure if DP is the most efficient way to solve this problem, but you asked for DP.

min[i] = min(min[i - 1] + 1, 1 + min[i - prev]) where prev is a square number < i
This is close, I would write condition as

min[i] = min(1 + min[i - prev]) for each square number 'prev <= i'

Note, that for each i you need to check different possible values of prev.

Here's simple implementation in Java.

Arrays.fill(min, Integer.MAX_VALUE);
min[0] = 0;
for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i) {
    for (int j = 1; j*j <= i; ++j) {
        min[i] = Math.min(min[i], min[i - j*j] + 1);
    }
}
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  • 2
    +1 for an implementation. The OP might want to skip the inner loop in cases where i is a perfect square, in keeping with his DP definition. Though it might take more time checking whether i is a square, than going through the loop! – LarsH Oct 19 '10 at 11:41
  • Maybe you want to fix a typo: In the formula after "would write condition as", the min(...) expression is missing a second argument "min[i]" - like in the code snippet. (I tried to update your answer, but my edit was rejected: "This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer".) – JimiLoe Apr 28 '16 at 15:17
5

Seems to me that you're close...

You're taking the min() of two terms, each of which is min[i - p] + 1, where p is either 1 or some other square < i.

To fix this, just take the min() of min[i - p] + 1 over all p (where p is a square < i).

That would be a correct way. There may be a faster way.

Also, it might aid readability if you give min[] and min() different names. :-)

P.S. the above approach requires that you memoize min[], either explicitly, or as part of your DP framework. Otherwise, the complexity of the algorithm, due to recursion, would be something like O(sqrt(n)!) :-p though the average case might be a lot better.

P.P.S. See @Nikita's answer for a nice implementation. To which I would add the following optimizations... (I'm not nitpicking his implementation -- he presented it as a simple one.)

  1. Check whether n is a perfect square, before entering the outer loop: if so, min[n] = 1 and we're done.
  2. Check whether i is a perfect square before entering the inner loop: if so, min[i] = 1, and skip the inner loop.
  3. Break out of the inner loop if min[i] has been set to 2, because it won't get better (if it could be done with one square, we would never have entered the inner loop, thanks to the previous optimization).
  4. I wonder if the termination condition on the inner loop can be changed to reduce the number of iterations, e.g. j*j*2 <= i or even j*j*4 <= i. I think so but I haven't got my head completely around it.
  5. For large i, it would be faster to compute a limit for j before the inner loop, and compare j directly to it for the loop termination condition, rather than squaring j on every inner loop iteration. E.g.

    float sqrti = Math.sqrt(i);
    for (int j = 1; j <= sqrti; ++j) {
    

    On the other hand, you need j^2 for the recursion step anyway, so as long as you store it, you might as well use it.

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  • Thanks for the optimizations. I didn't need all of them because n was not going to be too large. – rohit89 Oct 20 '10 at 12:45
0

For variety, here's another answer:

Define minsq[i, j] as the minimum number of squares from {1^2, 2^2, ..., j^2} that sum up to i. Then the recursion is:

minsq[i, j] = min(minsq[i - j*j, j] + 1, minsq[i, j - 1])

i.e., to compute minsq[i, j] we either use j^2 or we don't. Our answer for n is then:

minsq[n, floor(sqrt(n))]

This answer is perhaps conceptually simpler than the one presented earlier, but code-wise it is more difficult since one needs to be careful with the base cases. The time complexity for both answers is asymptotically the same.

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0

I present a generalized very efficient dynamical programming algorithm to find the minimum number of positive integers of given power to reach a given target in JavaScript.

For example to reach 50000 with integers of 4th power the result would be [10,10,10,10,10] or to reach 18571 with integers of 7th power would result [3,4]. This algorithm would even work with rational powers such as to reach 222 with integers of 3/5th power would be [ 32, 32, 243, 243, 243, 3125 ]

function getMinimumCubes(tgt,p){
  var maxi = Math.floor(Math.fround(Math.pow(tgt,1/p))),
      hash = {0:[]},
       pow = 0,
         t = 0;
  for (var i = 1; i <= maxi; i++){
    pow = Math.fround(Math.pow(i,p));
    for (var j = 0; j <= tgt - pow; j++){
      t = j + pow;
      hash[t] = hash[t] ? hash[t].length <= hash[j].length ? hash[t]
                                                           : hash[j].concat(i)
                        : hash[j].concat(i);
    }
  }
  return hash[tgt];
}

var target = 729,
    result = [];
console.time("Done in");
result = getMinimumCubes(target,2);
console.timeEnd("Done in");
console.log("Minimum number of integers to square and add to reach", target, "is", result.length, "as", JSON.stringify(result));

console.time("Done in");
result = getMinimumCubes(target,6);
console.timeEnd("Done in");
console.log("Minimum number of integers to take 6th power and add to reach", target, "is", result.length, "as", JSON.stringify(result));

target = 500;
console.time("Done in");
result = getMinimumCubes(target,3);
console.timeEnd("Done in");
console.log("Minimum number of integers to cube and add to reach", target, "is", result.length, "as", JSON.stringify(result));

target = 2017;
console.time("Done in");
result = getMinimumCubes(target,4);
console.timeEnd("Done in");
console.log("Minimum number of integers to take 4th power and add to reach", target, "is", result.length, "as", JSON.stringify(result));

target = 99;
console.time("Done in");
result = getMinimumCubes(target,2/3);
console.timeEnd("Done in");
console.log("Minimum number of integers to take 2/3th power and add to reach", target, "are", result);

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