10

Consider the following code snippet that works perfectly fine:

class A
{
private:
    int d;
public:
    A(int n){ d = n;}
    friend int foo(A a);
};

int foo(A a)
{
    return a.d;
}

However, when I try to use a template for the class, I need to forward declare the friend function for it to run, as follows:

template <typename T>
class B;

template <typename T>
T foof(B<T> a);


template <typename T>
class B
{
private:
    T d;
public:
    B(T n){ d = n;}
    friend T foof<>(B<T> a);
};

template <typename T>
T foof(B<T> a)
{
    return a.d;
}

Why is the forward declaration necessary in the second example but not on the first one? Also, why do I have to put <> in the declaration of foof inside class B? Why isn't it enough that it is declared inside of the template? I am trying to understand how these things work so that I don't have to blindly memorize this kind of code when I need to use it.

Thanks

2 Answers 2

7

That is because

friend int foo(A a);

is declaration of function and a friend at the same time, but:

friend T foof<>(B<T> a);

Is friend declaration to template instantiation. That's different. Instantiation doesn't declare template function.


You could befriend whole function template, and then forward declaration isn't needed:

template <typename T>
class B
{
private:
    T d;
public:
    B(T n){ d = n;}
    template<class U>
    friend U foof(B<U> a);
};
1
  • 2
    Note: the latter has potentially unintended consequences. It says that, for any given T, we're friending all instantiations of foof, whether or not T is the template argument. In short, int foof<int>(B<int>); is a friend of B<double>. Consider whether that is a problem before taking the scorched-earth approach of blanket-friending all instantiations of a template function (or class).
    – WhozCraig
    Commented Sep 24, 2016 at 17:12
4

Why is the forward declaration necessary in the second example but not on the first one?

Because syntactically the second isn't a form that can be used to declare a function, but the first one is.

Also, why do I have to put <> in the declaration of foof inside class B? Why isn't it enough that it is declared inside of the template?

You're indicating that you're friending a specialization of a function template, as opposed to friending a function that is NOT a template, which is what it would mean otherwise. You can have non-template friend functions of class templates.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.