So, I'm trying to learn Python. It seems pretty easy, but evidently, I don't understand how classes are used. The following code gives me an error when I try to use the class.

class mystuff:
        def average(a,b,c): #get the average of three numbers
                result=a+b+c
                result=result/3
                return result

#now use the function average from the mystuff class
print mystuff.average(9,18,27)


File "class.py", line 7, in <module>
    print mystuff.average(9,18,27)
TypeError: unbound method average() must be called with mystuff instance as first argument (got int instance instead)

What's wrong?

  • 3
    Think of classes as the mold. You don't actually interact with the mold itself, but you use the mold to create objects, that you then can interact with. In order to do something with the object, you have to create it first. – Tim S. Aug 23 '14 at 3:57
up vote 80 down vote accepted

You can instantiate the class by declaring a variable and calling the class as if it were a function:

x = mystuff()
print x.average(9,18,27)

However, this won't work with the code you gave us. When you call a class method on a given object (x), it always passes a pointer to the object as the first parameter when it calls the function. So if you run your code right now, you'll see this error message:

TypeError: average() takes exactly 3 arguments (4 given)

To fix this, you'll need to modify the definition of the average method to take four parameters. The first parameter is an object reference, and the remaining 3 parameters would be for the 3 numbers.

  • do you mean it should take the argument self? – Josh Smeaton Dec 29 '08 at 2:32
  • 8
    you can call it however you want. "self" is just a convention. – nosklo Dec 29 '08 at 12:59
  • 11
    @JoshSmeaton You should use "self" really, because even though it's not technically required, it's a very standard convention and would make your code more mainstream with other python developers. – Tim S. Aug 23 '14 at 3:55

From your example, it seems to me you want to use a static method.

class mystuff:
  @staticmethod
  def average(a,b,c): #get the average of three numbers
    result=a+b+c
    result=result/3
    return result

print mystuff.average(9,18,27)

Please note that an heavy usage of static methods in python is usually a symptom of some bad smell - if you really need functions, then declare them directly on module level.

  • 2
    Sorry for the downvote, but I think you misinterpreted the question. It seems that stu is new to Python, so directing him to good resources about Python basics is probably better than showing him how to use static methods ;) – Dirk Stoop Dec 29 '08 at 0:10
  • 9
    On another hand, the explicit usage of "self" in python and wrong beliefs on static methods are quite a common pitfall for people coming from other languages. As many here are pointing documentation and resources, I think there should be at least one "straight" reply. Thanks for the comment! – rob Dec 29 '08 at 0:21
  • 1
    -1: Jumping to advanced concepts of staticmethod. – S.Lott Dec 29 '08 at 1:47
  • 1
    Unless you're making a utility class which is fine to make alot of static and class methods – Eran Moshe Nov 9 '16 at 11:52

To minimally modify your example, you could amend the code to:

class myclass(object):
        def __init__(self): # this method creates the class object.
                pass

        def average(self,a,b,c): #get the average of three numbers
                result=a+b+c
                result=result/3
                return result


mystuff=myclass()  # by default the __init__ method is then called.      
print mystuff.average(a,b,c)

Or to expand it more fully, allowing you to add other methods.

class myclass(object):
        def __init__(self,a,b,c):
                self.a=a
                self.b=b
                self.c=c
        def average(self): #get the average of three numbers
                result=self.a+self.b+self.c
                result=result/3
                return result

a=9
b=18
c=27
mystuff=myclass(a, b, c)        
print mystuff.average()
  • is it ok if we simply do myclass().average(a,b,c)? – DJ_Stuffy_K Mar 27 at 17:49
  • 1
    @DJ_Stuffy_K that code works for my first code example. But the original question related to instantiating the class so I included the def __init__() method. Your code snippet instantiates the class but there is no 'handle' left by which to access other methods that might use the same instance variables. Perhaps that helps. – cmoman Mar 28 at 20:45

Every function inside a class, and every class variable must take the self argument as pointed.

class mystuff:
    def average(a,b,c): #get the average of three numbers
            result=a+b+c
            result=result/3
            return result
    def sum(self,a,b):
            return a+b


print mystuff.average(9,18,27) # should raise error
print mystuff.sum(18,27) # should be ok

If class variables are involved:

 class mystuff:
    def setVariables(self,a,b):
            self.x = a
            self.y = b
            return a+b
    def mult(self):
            return x * y  # This line will raise an error
    def sum(self):
            return self.x + self.y

 print mystuff.setVariables(9,18) # Setting mystuff.x and mystuff.y
 print mystuff.mult() # should raise error
 print mystuff.sum()  # should be ok

You need to spend a little more time on some fundamentals of object-oriented programming.

This sounds harsh, but it's important.

  • Your class definition is incorrect -- although the syntax happens to be acceptable. The definition is simply wrong.

  • Your use of the class to create an object is entirely missing.

  • Your use of a class to do a calculation is inappropriate. This kind of thing can be done, but it requires the advanced concept of a @staticmehod.

Since your example code is wrong in so many ways, you can't get a tidy "fix this" answer. There are too many things to fix.

You'll need to look at better examples of class definitions. It's not clear what source material you're using to learn from, but whatever book you're reading is either wrong or incomplete.

Please discard whatever book or source you're using and find a better book. Seriously. They've mislead you on how a class definition looks and how it's used.

You might want to look at http://homepage.mac.com/s_lott/books/nonprog/htmlchunks/pt11.html for a better introduction to classes, objects and Python.

  • This link is not working now.. Can I have the course/book name instead? – Veronica Wenqian Cheng Apr 27 at 16:07

In python member function of a class need explicit self argument. Same as implicit this pointer in C++. For more details please check out this page.

  • self is not madatory. – UnkwnTech Dec 29 '08 at 0:20
  • 3
    Disagree. What is not mandatory is name of 'self'. But the first argument of Python member function is a reference to an object. Of course you have class and static methods, but for instance methods the rule applies. – Abgan Dec 29 '08 at 1:13
  • 1
    @Abgan: actually, it even applies for class and static methods -- the decorators just do some automangling so that the wrapped function receives different parameters than the wrapper. – kampu May 20 '13 at 6:10

Try this:

class mystuff:
    def average(_,a,b,c): #get the average of three numbers
            result=a+b+c
            result=result/3
            return result

#now use the function average from the mystuff class
print mystuff.average(9,18,27)

or this:

class mystuff:
    def average(self,a,b,c): #get the average of three numbers
            result=a+b+c
            result=result/3
            return result

#now use the function average from the mystuff class
print mystuff.average(9,18,27)

You never created an instance.

You've defined average as an instance method, thus, in order to use average you need to create an instance first.

  • 3
    Sorry f/t downvote; You're absolutely right, but that's not a very helpful answer – Dirk Stoop Dec 29 '08 at 0:11
  • The question is literally "what's wrong?" This answer does state what's wrong, so I'd argue it is an answer. – recursive Sep 18 '15 at 17:38
  • 1
    @recursive (Responding to 7 years later comment, 2 years later) I would argue the real question was in the title, which was literally "How to instantiate a class". Pointing out you need to create an instance when trying to learn how to create one is unhelpful; stating that it's an answer is pedantic based on the context (title). You didn't even elaborate or guide for a proper answer, someone else did for you. We were all new to programming and new to phrasing questions at some point. – BLaZuRE Jun 23 '17 at 2:49
  • @BLaZuRE: Agreed on all points. – recursive Jun 23 '17 at 15:57

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