203

I have the following JavaScript variables:

var fontsize = "12px"
var left= "200px"
var top= "100px"

I know that I can set them to my element iteratively like this:

document.getElementById("myElement").style.top=top
document.getElementById("myElement").style.left=left

Is it possible to set them all together at once, something like this?

document.getElementById("myElement").style = allMyStyle 
  • 1
    What would allMyStyle be in your example? At the beginning you have a list of single variables... – Felix Kling Oct 19 '10 at 13:24
  • 1
    font-size:12px; left:200px; top:100px – Mircea Oct 19 '10 at 13:26
  • 1
    If this would work,it would be a string containing all the CSS to be set: document.getElementById("myElement").style = font-size:12px; left:200px; top:100px – Mircea Oct 19 '10 at 13:32
  • Interestingly though, it seems that applying multiple css rules in a sequence as opposed to using the cssText method, is faster: jsperf.com/csstext-vs-multiple-css-rules/4 – Andrei Oniga Mar 13 '12 at 7:24

24 Answers 24

295

If you have the CSS values as string and there is no other CSS already set for the element (or you don't care about overwriting), make use of the cssText property:

document.getElementById("myElement").style.cssText = "display: block; position: absolute";

This is good in a sense as it avoids repainting the element every time you change a property (you change them all "at once" somehow).

On the other side, you would have to build the string first.

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  • 65
    document.getElementById("myElement").style.cssText +=';'+ cssString; will return a 'normalized' value for element.style.cssText- the new string will replace existing named properties with any new values, add new ones and leave the rest alone. – kennebec Oct 19 '10 at 15:45
  • 2
    @kennebec: Just tried it and you are right. I didn't know that, I just thought it appends to the already existing text. But it indeed replaces the values... – Felix Kling Oct 19 '10 at 15:55
  • 1
    I hoped somebody would get that and use it- I've never seen it documented. Good answer, by the way. – kennebec Oct 19 '10 at 20:19
  • 33
    @kennebec I've conducted a jsperf test and found that applying multiple css rules in a sequence as opposed to using the cssText method is faster: jsperf.com/csstext-vs-multiple-css-rules/4 – Andrei Oniga Mar 13 '12 at 7:25
  • 2
    @RohitTigga: A string containing CSS rules. E.g. display: block; position: absolute;. – Felix Kling Aug 23 '15 at 3:28
292

Using Object.assign:

Object.assign(yourelement.style,{fontsize:"12px",left:"200px",top:"100px"});

This also gives you ability to merge styles, instead of rewriting the CSS style.

You can also make a shortcut function:

const setStylesOnElement = function(styles, element){
    Object.assign(element.style, styles);
}
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  • 16
    sadly this method is not supported by IE11 kangax.github.io/compat-table/es6/… – AndrewSilver Jul 28 '16 at 15:29
  • 2
    @AndrewSilver - Use babel && one of the many polyfill libraries to get support for ES6 features in non-compatible browsers. – Periata Breatta Oct 21 '16 at 8:48
  • 1
    When using babel, this is the method to go with! Perfect! – nirazul Mar 28 '17 at 8:20
  • 1
    @Nirazul How to use it? I try document.querySelector('html').style = Object.assign({}, document.querySelector('html').style, { color: 'red'}) but nothing happen. – Jonathan Dion Apr 18 '17 at 2:23
  • 1
    This will suffice, as you expand a simple javascript object - No need to assign anything at all: Object.assign(document.querySelector('html').style, { color: 'red' }); ...Just make sure that the style isn't overwritten in a lower element. This is very probable when using it on the html element. – nirazul Apr 18 '17 at 8:23
52

@Mircea: It is very much easy to set the multiple styles for an element in a single statement. It doesn't effect the existing properties and avoids the complexity of going for loops or plugins.

document.getElementById("demo").setAttribute(
   "style", "font-size: 100px; font-style: italic; color:#ff0000;");

BE CAREFUL: If, later on, you use this method to add or alter style properties, the previous properties set using 'setAttribute' will be erased.

| improve this answer | |
  • removeAttribute might come in handy for those who might be thinking of using setAttribute to reset the style – Cedric Ipkiss Feb 23 '18 at 12:57
42

Make a function to take care of it, and pass it parameters with the styles you want changed..

function setStyle( objId, propertyObject )
{
 var elem = document.getElementById(objId);
 for (var property in propertyObject)
    elem.style[property] = propertyObject[property];
}

and call it like this

setStyle('myElement', {'fontsize':'12px', 'left':'200px'});

for the values of the properties inside the propertyObject you can use variables..

| improve this answer | |
  • I was using the .style property every time individually in order to not override if I were to change a style, but this works better, more condensed. – dragonore Nov 30 '14 at 18:29
  • 2
    Best solution, because as flexible and useful as cssText, but faster. – Simon Steinberger May 11 '15 at 6:25
17

A JavaScript library allows you to do these things very easily

jQuery

$('#myElement').css({
  font-size: '12px',
  left: '200px',
  top: '100px'
});

Object and a for-in-loop

Or, a much more elegant method is a basic object & for-loop

var el = document.getElementById('#myElement'),
    css = {
      font-size: '12px',
      left: '200px',
      top: '100px'
    };  

for(i in css){
   el.style[i] = css[i];
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Yes, but on this project I can not use jQuery...Thanx – Mircea Oct 19 '10 at 13:06
  • need to write fontsize as fontSize? – midstack Apr 30 '13 at 8:25
  • 1
    Yes. Properties are case sensitive, even when using string notation. It should be fontSize: 12px. – MyNameIsKo May 9 '13 at 20:31
  • I'd say font-size ;) – mikus Nov 2 '15 at 9:49
14

set multiple css style properties in Javascript

document.getElementById("yourElement").style.cssText = cssString;

or

document.getElementById("yourElement").setAttribute("style",cssString);

Example:

document
.getElementById("demo")
.style
.cssText = "margin-left:100px;background-color:red";

document
.getElementById("demo")
.setAttribute("style","margin-left:100px; background-color:red");
| improve this answer | |
14

I just stumbled in here and I don't see why there is so much code required to achieve this.

Add your CSS code as a string.

let styles = `
    font-size:15em;
    color:red;
    transform:rotate(20deg)`

document.querySelector('*').style = styles
a

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I use this method too because it is useful if you don't have other inline styles, but sometimes it causes problems. – Любопытный Apr 20 '19 at 6:27
  • If problems occur then only due bad implementation. It all depends how, when and where you apply it to your code. – Thielicious Jan 27 at 8:05
3

You can have individual classes in your css files and then assign the classname to your element

or you can loop through properties of styles as -

var css = { "font-size": "12px", "left": "200px", "top": "100px" };

for(var prop in css) {
  document.getElementById("myId").style[prop] = css[prop];
}
| improve this answer | |
  • That is not an option sice the variables are dynamic – Mircea Oct 19 '10 at 13:07
  • This isn't exactly what the user asked, but it is most likely the most viable solution. +1 – Ryan Kinal Oct 19 '10 at 13:07
  • 2
    @Sachin "font-size" needs to be camel-cased as "fontSize". Hyphnated style names are not guaranteed to work across browsers, unless you use setAttribute. – Ashwin Prabhu Apr 14 '14 at 10:50
2

Don't think it is possible as such.

But you could create an object out of the style definitions and just loop through them.

var allMyStyle = {
  fontsize: '12px',
  left: '200px',
  top: '100px'
};

for (i in allMyStyle)
  document.getElementById("myElement").style[i] = allMyStyle[i];

To develop further, make a function for it:

function setStyles(element, styles) {
  for (i in styles)
    element.style[i] = styles[i];
}

setStyles(document.getElementById("myElement"), allMyStyle);
| improve this answer | |
2

Using plain Javascript, you can't set all the styles at once; you need to use single lines for each of them.

However, you don't have to repeat the document.getElementById(...).style. code over and over; create an object variable to reference it, and you'll make your code much more readable:

var obj=document.getElementById("myElement").style;
obj.top=top;
obj.left=left;

...etc. Much easier to read than your example (and frankly, just as easy to read as the jQuery alternative).

(if Javascript had been designed properly, you could also have used the with keyword, but that's best left alone, as it can cause some nasty namespace issues)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That is not true, you can set all styles at once via cssText. – Felix Kling Oct 19 '10 at 13:26
  • 3
    @Felix: cssText is fine for setting the inline stylesheet value. However if you've also got classes, or if you only want to override some values but not all, it can be quite hard to use cssText. So you're right; you can do it, but I'd recommend against it for most use cases. – Spudley Oct 19 '10 at 13:57
  • 1
    Well having classes is no argument... obj.top or obj.style.color also justs sets the inline stylesheet value. And yes, in my answer I said that one would overwrite the values... it depends on the context if it is useful or not. – Felix Kling Oct 19 '10 at 14:34
  • 1
    You better make that obj=document.getElementById("myElement").style; or set your properties obj.style.top=top. – kennebec Oct 19 '10 at 15:12
  • @kennebec - hmm, could have sworn I did that. oh well, edited. thanks for spotting. – Spudley Oct 19 '10 at 16:00
2

Simplest way for me was just using a string/template litteral:

elementName.style.cssText = `
                                width:80%;
                                margin: 2vh auto;
                                background-color: rgba(5,5,5,0.9);
                                box-shadow: 15px 15px 200px black; `;

Great option cause you can use multiple line strings making life easy.

Check out string/template litterals here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Template_literals

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1

Your best bet may be to create a function that sets styles on your own:

var setStyle = function(p_elem, p_styles)
{
    var s;
    for (s in p_styles)
    {
        p_elem.style[s] = p_styles[s];
    }
}

setStyle(myDiv, {'color': '#F00', 'backgroundColor': '#000'});
setStyle(myDiv, {'color': mycolorvar, 'backgroundColor': mybgvar});

Note that you will still have to use the javascript-compatible property names (hence backgroundColor)

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1

See for .. in

Example:

var myStyle = {};
myStyle.fontsize = "12px";
myStyle.left= "200px";
myStyle.top= "100px";
var elem = document.getElementById("myElement");
var elemStyle = elem.style;
for(var prop in myStyle) {
  elemStyle[prop] = myStyle[prop];
}
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1

This is old thread, so I figured for anyone looking for a modern answer, I would suggest using Object.keys();

var myDiv = document.getElementById("myDiv");
var css = {
    "font-size": "14px",
    "color": "#447",
    "font-family": "Arial",
    "text-decoration": "underline"
};

function applyInlineStyles(obj) {
    var result = "";
    Object.keys(obj).forEach(function (prop) {
        result += prop + ": " + obj[prop] + "; ";
    });
    return result;
}

myDiv.style = applyInlineStyles(css);
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1

There are scenarios where using CSS alongside javascript might make more sense with such a problem. Take a look at the following code:

document.getElementById("myElement").classList.add("newStyle");
document.getElementById("myElement").classList.remove("newStyle");

This simply switches between CSS classes and solves so many problems related with overriding styles. It even makes your code more tidy.

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0

You can write a function that will set declarations individually in order not to overwrite any existing declarations that you don't supply. Let's say you have this object parameter list of declarations:

const myStyles = {
  'background-color': 'magenta',
  'border': '10px dotted cyan',
  'border-radius': '5px',
  'box-sizing': 'border-box',
  'color': 'yellow',
  'display': 'inline-block',
  'font-family': 'monospace',
  'font-size': '20px',
  'margin': '1em',
  'padding': '1em'
};

You might write a function that looks like this:

function applyStyles (el, styles) {
  for (const prop in styles) {
    el.style.setProperty(prop, styles[prop]);
  }
};

which takes an element and an object property list of style declarations to apply to that object. Here's a usage example:

const p = document.createElement('p');
p.textContent = 'This is a paragraph.';
document.body.appendChild(p);

applyStyles(p, myStyles);
applyStyles(document.body, {'background-color': 'grey'});

// styles to apply
const myStyles = {
  'background-color': 'magenta',
  'border': '10px dotted cyan',
  'border-radius': '5px',
  'box-sizing': 'border-box',
  'color': 'yellow',
  'display': 'inline-block',
  'font-family': 'monospace',
  'font-size': '20px',
  'margin': '1em',
  'padding': '1em'
};

function applyStyles (el, styles) {
  for (const prop in styles) {
    el.style.setProperty(prop, styles[prop]);
  }
};

// create example paragraph and append it to the page body
const p = document.createElement('p');
p.textContent = 'This is a paragraph.';
document.body.appendChild(p);

// when the paragraph is clicked, call the function, providing the
// paragraph and myStyles object as arguments
p.onclick = (ev) => {
  applyStyles(p, myStyles);
}

// this time, target the page body and supply an object literal
applyStyles(document.body, {'background-color': 'grey'});

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0

I think is this a very simple way with regards to all solutions above:

const elm = document.getElementById("myElement")

const allMyStyle = [
  { prop: "position", value: "fixed" },
  { prop: "boxSizing", value: "border-box" },
  { prop: "opacity", value: 0.9 },
  { prop: "zIndex", value: 1000 },
];

allMyStyle.forEach(({ prop, value }) => {
  elm.style[prop] = value;
});
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0

Use CSSStyleDeclaration.setProperty() method inside the Object.entries of styles object.
We can also set the priority ("important") for CSS property with this.
We will use "hypen-case" CSS property names.

const styles = {
  "font-size": "18px",
  "font-weight": "bold",
  "background-color": "lightgrey",
  color: "red",
  "padding": "10px !important",
  margin: "20px",
  width: "100px !important",
  border: "1px solid blue"
};

const elem = document.getElementById("my_div");

Object.entries(styles).forEach(([prop, val]) => {
  const [value, pri = ""] = val.split("!");
  elem.style.setProperty(prop, value, pri);
});
<div id="my_div"> Hello </div>

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0

Is the below innerHtml valid

var styleElement = win.document.createElement("STYLE");
styleElement.innerHTML = "#notEditableVatDisplay {display:inline-flex} #editableVatInput,.print-section,i.fa.fa-sort.click-sortable{display : none !important}";

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0

With ES6+ you can use also backticks and even copy the css directly from somewhere:

const $div = document.createElement('div')
$div.innerText = 'HELLO'
$div.style.cssText = `
    background-color: rgb(26, 188, 156);
    width: 100px;
    height: 30px;
    border-radius: 7px;
    text-align: center;
    padding-top: 10px;
    font-weight: bold;
`

document.body.append($div)

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0

Please consider the use of CSS for adding style class and then add this class by JavaScript classList & simply add() function.

style.css

.nice-style { 
fontsize : 12px; 
left: 200px;
top: 100px;
}

script JavaScript

const addStyle = document.getElementById("myElement"); addStyle.classList.add('nice-style');

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0

Since strings support adding, you can easily add your new style without overriding the current:

document.getElementById("myElement").cssText += `
   font-size: 12px;
   left: 200px;
   top: 100px;
`;
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-1
<button onclick="hello()">Click!</button>

<p id="demo" style="background: black; color: aliceblue;">
  hello!!!
</p>

<script>
  function hello()
  {
    (document.getElementById("demo").style.cssText =
      "font-size: 40px; background: #f00; text-align: center;")
  }
</script>
| improve this answer | |
-1

We can add styles function to Node prototype:

Node.prototype.styles=function(obj){ for (var k in obj)    this.style[k] = obj[k];}

Then, simply call styles method on any Node:

elem.styles({display:'block', zIndex:10, transitionDuration:'1s', left:0});

It will preserve any other existing styles and overwrite values present in the object parameter.

| improve this answer | |

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