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I'm trying to get a user to input a three digit number, so between 100 and 999, and then output what the individual digits are. If the input isnt within a three digit number then they are asked to input again. It works if I type in a three digit number, and for a string the repetition of asking again works, but a number not within that range doesn't work. Instead it prints the first three indexes of the word FALSE. How do I change this?

while True:

    try:
     number=int(input("Enter a three digit number:")) in range(99,1000)

     break        
except ValueError:

     print("Enter a three digit number:")
     continue
number=str(number)

print("Your digits are: " ,number[0] ,number[1] ,number[2])

closed as off-topic by jonrsharpe, OptimusCrime, idjaw, Bhargav Rao, Morgan Thrapp Oct 6 '16 at 13:54

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – jonrsharpe, OptimusCrime, idjaw, Bhargav Rao, Morgan Thrapp
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1. Your indentation is off. 2. You are assigning the result of the in operation to number, not the input. Make it a separate step. – jonrsharpe Sep 25 '16 at 12:15
  • @jonrsharpe im pretty new to this sort of stuff, could you explain how to make it a separate step? – Ashley Sep 25 '16 at 12:17
  • 4
    Well, you see how you're doing it in the same line? Do it in a different line, instead. – jonrsharpe Sep 25 '16 at 12:18
  • I still don't know what you mean. How do I assign it on a different line? please explain – Ashley Sep 25 '16 at 12:23
  • 2
    Cut the line you have to number = int(input("Enter a three digit number:")). That's all. Then you can perform other operations on number. I'm not going to spoon feed you, that isn't what SO is for. – jonrsharpe Sep 25 '16 at 12:24
1

is this what you're looking for?

while True:
    try:
        number=int(input("Enter a three digit number:"))
        number=str(number)
    except ValueError:
        print("Please only enter in numbers.")
        continue
    if len(number)!=3:
        print("Not a three digit number.")
    else:
        print("Your digits are: " ,number[0] ,number[1] ,number[2])
        break
  • Yes, actually use Mr.goosberry's answer, it's a lot cleaner than mine. However, you need to change the > 3 to !=3. This will mean that it will only accept a length of 3 numbers. – Joshua Stokes Sep 25 '16 at 13:52
0

First off, you have a few bugs/mistakes in your code.

  • You should have put the in range(99, 999) on a separate line
  • Why are you converting your input to a number, and then converting it back to a string? Just keep it as a string.

After addressing those bugs, here is what I did to fix your code.

  • I removed the int() function from around your input() function. Just use int() as needed.

  • I removed the in range(99, 999) as that was irrelevant.

  • I also removed the try/except block, because that is unnecessary.

  • In the place of the try/except block I use if statements. the if statement tests if the input is a integer, and then tests if it is a three digit integer.

Here is your code after my modifications:

while True:
    number=input("Enter a three digit number:")
    if not (number.isdigit() and 99 < int(number) < 1000):
        print("Please Enter a three digit number.")
        continue
    break        
print("Your digits are: " ,number[0] ,number[1] ,number[2])
  • looks like the OP only want a 3 digit number, therefore the check should be len(number)!=3 also the isdigit will fail to filter zero starting input numbers like "001". The OP have the right idea, but implemented it the wrong way... – Copperfield Sep 25 '16 at 15:30
  • you can also use not ( 99 < int(number)<1000 ) to just call int just once on number, and also pack all that together in just one if line not ( x.isnumber() and 99<int(x)<1000 ) as and stop evaluating if the first element is false – Copperfield Sep 25 '16 at 16:53
  • @Copperfield excellent points, thanks you. I'll edit those in. I complete forgot that Python had chained comparison. – Christian Dean Sep 25 '16 at 18:57

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