0

the partition problem (or number partitioning1) is the task of deciding whether a given multiset S of positive integers can be partitioned into two subsets S1 and S2 such that the sum of the numbers in S1 equals the sum of the numbers in S2.

There is a greedy algorithm for this problem:

One approach to the problem, imitating the way children choose teams for a game, is the greedy algorithm, which iterates through the numbers in descending order, assigning each of them to whichever subset has the smaller sum. This approach has a running time of O(n log n). This heuristic works well in practice when the numbers in the set are of about the same size as its cardinality or less, but it is not guaranteed to produce the best possible partition. For example, given the set S = {4, 5, 6, 7, 8} as input, this greedy algorithm would partition S into subsets {4, 5, 8} and {6, 7}; however, S has an exactly balanced partition into subsets {7, 8} and {4, 5, 6}.

But, I don't know how to prove This heuristic works well in practice when the numbers in the set are of about the same size as its cardinality or less. Can anyone help?

1

The claim is not a precise one; it's just saying that if the elements of the multiset aren't much bigger than its cardinality, then the heuristic will usually give the right answer, unless you make a point of seeking out cases where it doesn't. So the claim can't really be "proven" as-is.

Furthermore, there are many different ways that the claim could be made precise; and not all of those ways necessarily result in a true claim. So you can't just make the claim precise and then prove that.


However, if you read the paragraph after the one you cite, it offers a related claim that is precise, and that is (according to the article) correct, namely that if the multiset S can be partitioned into two multisets whose sums are both ≤ OPT, then this greedy algorithm will partition it into two multisets whose sums are both ≤ ⁷/₆ OPT. However, this claim is not the same as the original claim; it sets an upper bound on how wrong the heuristic can be, but it doesn't guarantee that it's ever exactly right, and it doesn't make any reference to the values of the elements.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.