5

Is it a good practice to make some data processing/validation in getters and setters? In wikipedia here there are 2 examples:

  • setDate method stores java.util.Date date in 3 separate private fields like year, month, day
  • getAmount method concatenate 2 fields number and currency and return something like "100 USD". And maybe amount field itself does not exist at all and getAmount is just a calculation method.

Are these good examples or it is better to avoid it? If it is better to avoid it, how can I implement these 2 examples above in a better way?

UPDATE: Please, Do not take examples with date and etc serious. It is just an example, of course it can be stupid.

Real example which I had.

I have an external third party system and I have to make integration. This external system expect from me some data as class with getters and setters. I have to pass 2 fields there, id (something like 09df723987cd7 (let's say GUID)) and formattedID something like "objecttype/09df723987cd7". I cannot change this external system.

I want to implement it like

getId() {
  return id
}

getFormattedId() {
    return objectType + "/" + id;
}

objectType is another field in this class.

My Question: is it OK, or there is some more elegant way to implement it?

  • 6
    "setDate method stores java.util.Date date in 3 separate private fields like year, month, day" - for the love of God, why?! – Boris the Spider Sep 26 '16 at 12:14
  • 4
    "getAmount method concatenate 2 fields number and currency and return something like "100 USD"" - for the love of God why?! – Boris the Spider Sep 26 '16 at 12:15
  • @BoristheSpider Because Wikipedia says so. It must be true, mustn't it? – Adrian Colomitchi Sep 26 '16 at 12:17
  • 1
    @dsp_user not at all, this sort of separation of field is the cause of so many date related bugs it's not even funny any more. If you ever find yourself doing what the OP suggests; you deserve all the late night angry phone calls that will inevitably result. – Boris the Spider Sep 26 '16 at 12:20
  • 1
    Guys, it is just an examples, of course they are stupid. Examples does not matter. – Zlelik Sep 26 '16 at 12:22
2

The examples you provided are not good fit, at least not in the form and with the names you mentioned.

I'll try with some better examples:

Setters

You might want to use them for validation mostly. As an example setDate(Date d) could check the data is in a certain range, e.g. not more than 20 years into the future etc. (depends on your requirements).

Getters

If those contain more than simple logic they probably represent virtual properties, i.e. properties that don't have an underlying field but are calculated on the fly.

Let's take getAmount() for example: there might not be any field amount or the amount might be stored in cents (or smaller) for some reason (e.g. no precision issues). Thus getAmount() might look like this:

public double getAmount() {
  return amountInCents / 100.0;
}

Note that the name getAmount() might be misleading though, so you might be better off using a name like getAmountInUSD() or similar.

General

Using getters and setters in Java is adviceable in most cases since you'd be able to the following (list not complete):

  • add validation logic (to the setters)
  • add transformation logic (setters, getters) for virtual properties
  • define access, i.e. read-only would mean there is no public setter
  • use libraries that are based on the Java Beans specification (which requires the use of setters and getters)
  • decouple the client/caller of the getter/setter, i.e. if at some point you want to add validation having field access done via a setter would not require the client to change (unless validation errors would need to be handled) etc.
  • use setters and getters for debugging purposes, e.g. by putting a breakpoint at the method and have a look at the stack trace to see who called it (mentioned by dsp_user)
  • 1
    In addition to your list, getters/setters can also be used for logging/debugging purposes – dsp_user Sep 26 '16 at 12:37
  • @dsp_user good point, added it. – Thomas Sep 26 '16 at 12:45
  • Thanks. Very good answer. – Zlelik Sep 26 '16 at 14:38
1

Anecdotes with setters and getters

My point? Like anything in this world, it's not a black-and-white clear cut what is the best way to use getters and setters.


Setterless classes and Builder pattern

Sometimes a class has heaps of properties (impractical to design a constructor taking all of them, and then if you do it anyway it is excruciating painful to use). Supplementary, many times such classes should be immutable after construction (so no public setters).

A Builder pattern with a Fluent interface gets the things... well... flowing

To validate or not to validate at setting time ?

For most of the cases, it is Ok to perform a validation at the setters level. However, it is not always wise to do it.

For example, there are cases in which the object can "transition" through invalid states and reach a "valid and self consistent state" only after a sequence of calls in the setters.
For example: "A motorcycle without two wheels is not a valid motorcycle" doesn't mean that I cannot setFrontWheel(null) as a temporary stage in repairing my motorcycle... design by contract be damn'd, I'll just call validateMe at the end and be done with it.

Multi-setters

If you need to perform validation on setting and certain combination of values don't make sense, use a multi-setter:

void setDate(int y, int m, int day) {
  int maxDaysInMonth=0;
  switch(m) {
    case 1:
    case 3:
    ...
    case 11:
       maxDaysInMonth=31;
       break;
    case 2: // that's feb
       maxDaysInMonth=isLeap(y) ? 29 : 28;
       break;
    case 4:
    case 6:
    ...
       maxDaysInMonth=30;
       break;
    default: // only 12 months in the year
       throw something;
  }
  if(d>=maxDaysInMonth) {
    // you catch my drift, yeah?
  }
}

Getters:

  1. "computed getters" - like that "100 USD" - is not a property in itself, many would argue the method should be called "computeSomething" or "toSomeForm" (like "toString"), but... is just so convenient and easy to remember Rectangle.getCentreX

  2. "restricted getters" - like

    protected ArrayList listeners;
    // look-but-don't-touch getter
    public List getListeners() {
      return Collections.unmodifiableList(this.listeners):
    }
  1. "void returning getters" - when the values are to be returned (copied or placed) inside a destination provided as a parameter. Useful when you wants to deny direct access to the data member itself and to avoid creating copies of your inner data - also goes hand in hand with high performance requirements. E.g.
     class Rectangle {
        void getCentre(Point2D resultHere) {
          resultHere.set(minX+width/2, minY+height/2);
        }
        // and not
        // Point2D getCentre() {
        //   return new Point2D.Double(minX+width/2, minY+height/2);
        // }
        // because... performance.
     }
1

TL;DR: Yes. This is exactly what setters and getters are meant for!

The first thing to understand is why we use getters and setters in the first place.

The purpose of getters and setters is to be able to present the class as a public API so that the user can store their object and manipulate the data in the way it is meant to be manipulated (for some classes, such as an immutable class, this could mean not manipulating it at all).

The getters allow us to expose information stored in the class without the user knowing how that information is stored. It should be irrelevant to the user whether a phone number is stored in 3 separate fields for each part of the number (for US numbers) or if it is stored in a single field. All they care about is that they get it in the format specified by the class contract

The setters allow the user to manipulate the object. Again, they don't care if when they pass in a Date object, you split it into separate fields. They just want to know if you give a getter that promises to pass back an equivalent Date object that they get a Date object equivalent to what they passed in the setter.

The entire purpose of the getters and setters is that the user of the class has no idea what fields actually exist in the class (this is why it is good to always make them private).

Why is making all fields private so important?

By making all the fields private we can go back later and change whatever we want so long as it doesn't change the result of the getter methods.

For example let us say we have such a class representing a person:

public class Person {

    private String name;
    private String address;

    public Person(String firstName, String lastName) {
        setName(firstName, lastName);
    }

    /**
     * @return The first and last name as a single String
     */
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String firstName, String lastName) {
        this.name = firstName + " " + lastName;
    }

    /**
     * @return The entire address as a single String
     */
    public String getAddress() {
        return address;
    }

    public void setAddress(String houseNumber, String streetName, String city, String state, String zip) {
        this.address = houseNumber + " "  + streetName + " " + city + " " + state + " " + zip;
    }
}

When creating the class we decided we do not need to store the first and last name separately and that the address could be a single field as well (for whatever reason). What happens if we want to change that and split the first and last name into 2 separate fields and that the address should be split into separate fields as well.

If we had left our fields exposed (by making them public) we would never be able to change them. Anyone may be using them by declaring Person.name = "John Doe". Changing the name of the field would break their program entirely.

If we kept them private we can now do whatever we want to them. We just need to update our methods so that they return the same data. So to split up the name and address fields we would do the following:

public class Person {

    private String firstName;
    private String lastName;
    private String houseNumber;
    private String streetName;
    private String city;
    private String state;
    private String zip;

    public Person(String firstName, String lastName) {
        setName(firstName, lastName);
    }

    /**
     * @return The first and last name as a single String
     */
    public String getName() {
        return firstName + " " +lastName;
    }

    public void setName(String firstName, String lastName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
        this.lastName = lastName;
    }

    /**
     * @return The entire address as a single String
     */
    public String getAddress() {
        return houseNumber + " " + streetName + " " + city + " " + state + " " + zip;
    }

    public void setAddress(String houseNumber, String streetName, String city, String state, String zip) {
        this.houseNumber = houseNumber;
        this.streetName = streetName;
        this.city = city;
        this.state = state;
        this.zip = zip;
    }
}

We were just able to change the entire implementation of our class without breaking the code of anyone using our code. This is the power of encapsulation and why it is so important in OOP.

If we feel that the users should be able to manipulate each field directly we could then add getters and setters for the individual fields. Of course by doing so we now can't change back and merge the fields because someone may be using the getters and setters.

Where does validation fit into all of this?

You asked about validation as well. It should be clear by now that the public methods of your class are what define your class contract. Validating the data is extremely important because it enforces the contract by not allowing anyone to put bad data into that object. You can always relax restrictions later, adding them in is a much harder thing to do and will always have the possibility of breaking code.

For example if you have an age field in your Person class. You will likely have a setAge(int age) method in your class (more likely it is calculated based on a birthDate field, but for now lets say it is just an age field).

The method should look something like this:

public void setAge(int age) {
    if (age < 0 || age > 120) 
        throw IllegalArgumentException("age must be between 0 and 120");

    this.age = age;
}

The upper bound on the age is debatable, but validating the lower bound is a must! Nobody can be less than 0 years old. Depending on your application you may want to raise the lower bound. Perhaps they need to be 13 or 18 years old to use your application.

As mentioned above adding in restrictions late is a much more difficult prospect than relaxing them later.

0

Sort of. Sometimes a setter method may need to take a different type and massage it into the internal representation of the property. Example:

class Example {
    private Integer value;
    public void setValue(Integer value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
    public void setValue(String value) {
        try {
           this.value = Integer.parseInt(value);
        } catch (NumberFormatException nfe) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format("%s contains no valid numeric string.", value));
        }
    }
}

The overloaded setValue that accepts a String is a valid example. However, in general, proper getters and setters will map directly to the internal representation of the property. So for example, the setDate example would just operate on a Date object and set the internal Date property of the object, in part because hours, minutes, etc. are all part of the Date and breaking up the Date is a bad practice in such cases.

0

Getter and setter fulfill the purpose of encapsulation.

For example,

public class Sample
{
     private int somedata; // Encapsulated
     public int Get() {return somedata;} //Getter
     public void Set(int var) {somedata = var;} // Setter
}

It is a good practice to do so in OOP.

For processing and then setting data, setters may be needed for special objects like data which has three sub-parts of year, month, day. They can be overloaded for processing basic data.

0

Wikipedia link says, if a date is represented by separate private year, month and day

This doesnt recoommend it says that if this exists. Never Play with data types they have been made with something in mind.

validations can be made at field declaration uisng validator framework like

..
import javax.validation.constraints.Pattern;
import javax.validation.constraints.Size;
...

    public class xyz{


        private int id;

        @NotEmpty(message="Name is compulsary")
        @Size(min = 3, max = 100,message="Name  must be between 3 to 100 characters")
        private String personName;
        @NotEmpty(message="Person type is compulsary")
        private String personType;
        private String designation;
        private String purpos.......
0

Are these practices good? Yes and No. Here is why :

1. setDate method stores java.util.Date date in 3 separate private fields like year, month, day.

If you closely notice the code of java.util.Date, it's deprecated one to store date in 3 seperate fields. Here is the reason why it has been deprecated.

A java.util.Date has both a date and a time portion. You can ignored the time portion in your code. In this case, date class will take the beginning of the day as defined by your JVM’s default time zone and apply that time to the Date object. So the results of your code will vary depending on which machine it runs or which time zone is set. Probably not what you want.

So it's not good practice to do so, which Java dev realized and deprecated certain functions.

2. getAmount method concatenate 2 fields number and currency and return something like "100 USD".

Yes, this is perfectly fine unless and until you are using this value only for display purpose and not for referencing as this value is final concatenation of two other value.

0

setDate method stores java.util.Date date in 3 separate private fields like year, month, day

Yes, you can do that. What you do with the date is your business, you can store it in a String if you prefer, that should not interfer in anyway with the user of your class.

The problem of validation is different. You could read this about design by contract

let say you have a class Divide:

class Divide {
private int dividend = 0;
private int diviser = 1;
private int result;
private int modulo;

public void  setDividend(int dividend) {
    this.dividend = dividend;
    this.result = this.dividend / this.diviser;
}

public void setDiviser(int diviser) {
    this.diviser = diviser;
    this.result = this.dividend / this.diviser;
}

...

The problem is whether you should check if diviser is null. That's the kind of problems solved by design by contract. So you can write:

   public void setDiviser(int diviser) {
        if (diviser == 0) throw ... // Zero divide exception
        this.diviser = diviser;
        this.result = this.dividend / this.diviser;
    }

But that's very inefficient because you are having this check everytime divider is set, maybe the caller has also checked and when the operation will be done it will be checked another time.

So:

   // I have been told "by contract" that diviser won't be zero
   public void setDiviser(int diviser) {
        this.diviser = diviser;
        try {
            this.result = this.dividend / this.diviser;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            // do something about it
        }
    }

There are other options like making the method throwable, but be really careful if you want to make efficient validations. Naturally Java does not implement design by contract fully but with exceptions you can keep the spirit.

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