0

I have a table called "EventLog" which has the column called nDateTime of type int.

This is the table "EventLog" with some values:

-----------------
|   nDateTime   |
-----------------
|   978307200   |
-----------------
|   978307219   |
-----------------
|   978513562   |
-----------------
|   978516233   |
-----------------
|   978544196   |
-----------------
|   1450379547  |
-----------------
|   1472299563  |
-----------------
|   1472299581  |
-----------------
|   1472300635  |
-----------------
|   1472300644  |
-----------------
|   1472300673  |
-----------------

I need to get the DateTime value, and I tried the following statements, but I receive these errors:

Test #1:

SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, CONVERT(CHAR(8), nDateTime), 103) AS 'Formatted date'
FROM EventLog

The error says:

Conversion failed when converting date and/or time from character string.

Test #2: modified from here:

SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, nDateTime, 103) AS 'Formatted date'
FROM EventLog

And Test #3 goes:

SELECT CAST(nDateTime AS datetime) AS 'Formatted date'
FROM EventLog

The duplicate question doesn't answer my question because (both, test #2 and test #3) generates this error:

Arithmetic overflow error converting expression to data type datetime.

I admit that I never saw such value as a Date, and for that, I'm kind of confused in how to proceed.

My question is: How can get the valid DateTime value from the sample data?

  • 1
    seems to be a duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/7830002/… Which states: "You can't convert an integer value straight to a date but you can first it to a datetime then to a date type "so... "select cast(cast(40835 as datetime) as date)" other than version of SQL server 2008 vs 2012 – xQbert Sep 26 '16 at 15:45
  • @xQbert I already check that question, but the Arithmetic overflow error converting expression to data type datetime. appears. sorry if I sound rude, my english isn't so good – Mauricio Arias Olave Sep 26 '16 at 15:49
  • 1
    1) "978307200" has 9 characters, not 8. 2) Can you give us any idea of where the number came from and what it represents, e.g. some number of milliseconds since some date? – Andrew Morton Sep 26 '16 at 15:49
  • @AndrewMorton 2) I honestly have no idea, unfortunately. I just receive a database and I'm check each table, no documentation or orientation received. – Mauricio Arias Olave Sep 26 '16 at 15:52
  • 1
    So you have no idea what date any of those numbers actually represent? So we have no way to verify the result? – Jamiec Sep 26 '16 at 16:00
2

Almost every time you see a date/time represented as an integer, that number represents the passage of time since a known epoch. This is the basis of Unix time which is, put simply, the number of seconds which have elapsed since 1st January 1970 00:00:00

Using this, we can check with some values you have provided

declare @dt DATETIME = '1970-01-01' -- epoch start
print dateadd(second,978307200,@dt ) -- Jan  1 2001 12:00AM
print dateadd(second,1472300673,@dt )  -- Aug 27 2016 12:24PM

Seems possible, but who knows?!

You can check every date in your table simply using

declare @dt DATETIME = '1970-01-01' -- epoch start
SELECT
   nDateTime AS OriginalData,
   DATEADD(second, nDateTime,@dt) AS ActualDateTime
FROM EventLog
0

Just for giggles, I took a stab at having the base date of 1970-01-01, but without KNOWING the base, it is just a guess

Declare @Log table (DateInt int)
Insert Into @Log values
(978307200),
(978307219),
(978513562),
(978516233),
(978544196),
(1450379547),
(1472299563),
(1472299581),
(1472300635),
(1472300644),
(1472300673)

Select DateInt,Converted= DateAdd(SECOND,DateInt,'1970-01-01') From @Log

Returns

DateInt     Converted
978307200   2001-01-01 00:00:00.000
978307219   2001-01-01 00:00:19.000
978513562   2001-01-03 09:19:22.000
978516233   2001-01-03 10:03:53.000
978544196   2001-01-03 17:49:56.000
1450379547  2015-12-17 19:12:27.000
1472299563  2016-08-27 12:06:03.000
1472299581  2016-08-27 12:06:21.000
1472300635  2016-08-27 12:23:55.000
1472300644  2016-08-27 12:24:04.000
1472300673  2016-08-27 12:24:33.000
-1

Your input is > 8 digits hence it is throwing arithmentic overflow error.. If it is 8 digits you will get converted data:

For Example:

DECLARE @ndatetime int =  978307200 
SELECT CONVERT(datetime, convert(varchar(10), @ndatetime, 112))

-- this throws arithmetic overflow error

DECLARE @ndatetime int =  97830720 -- with 8 digits only 
SELECT CONVERT(datetime, convert(varchar(10), @ndatetime, 112))

This returns converted date

You can try try_convert which will return null if it is wrong date

DECLARE @ndatetime int =  978307200
SELECT TRY_CONVERT(datetime, convert(varchar(10), @ndatetime, 112))
  • Thank you for your answer. With the second sql statement in your question I get: 9783-07-20 00:00:00.000. I'm wondering if those values are really datetime values...for example, if instead 97830720 you use 147402833, the following error appears: Conversion failed when converting date and/or time from character string. . I'll edit my question. – Mauricio Arias Olave Sep 26 '16 at 16:01
  • This answer just assumes those numbers represent a date - unless you're dealing with event logs from the year 9783, i find this very unlikely. – Jamiec Sep 26 '16 at 16:04
  • How you want to interpret the date 978307200 ? Any logic you have in mind? – Kannan Kandasamy Sep 26 '16 at 16:05
  • @KannanKandasamy I think thats the question! – Jamiec Sep 26 '16 at 16:06
  • This format 112 assumes that it is valid date for example 20160926 will be represented as date '2016-09-26' ... – Kannan Kandasamy Sep 26 '16 at 16:08

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