21

I'm trying to get familiar with the docker ecosystem and tried to setup a mysql database container. With docker-compose this looks like:

version: '2'
services:
  db:
    image: mysql:5.6.33@sha256:31ad2efd094a1336ef1f8efaf40b88a5019778e7d9b8a8579a4f95a6be88eaba
    volumes:
      - "./db/data:/var/lib/mysql"
      - "./db/log:/var/log/mysql"
      - "./db/conf:/etc/mysql/conf.d"
    restart: "yes"
    environment:
      MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: rootpw
      MYSQL_DATABASE: db
      MYSQL_USER: db
      MYSQL_PASSWORD: dbpw

My conf directory contains one file:

[mysqld]
log_error       =/var/log/mysql/mysql_error.log
general_log_file=/var/log/mysql/mysql.log
general_log     =1
slow_query_log  =1
slow_query_log_file=/var/log/mysql/mysql_slow.log
long_query_time =2
log_queries_not_using_indexes = 1

Unfortunately I don't get any log files that way. The setup itself is correct and the cnf file is used. After connecting to the container and creating the 3 files, chown them to mysql and restarting the container, the logging is working as expected.

I'm pretty sure that this is a common scenario, and my current way to get it running seems really stupid. What is the correct way to do it?

I could improve my approach by moving all this stuff in a Dockerfile, but this still seem strange to me.

6

After connecting to the container and creating the 3 files, chown them to mysql and restarting the container, the logging is working as expected.

That points to a host volume permission issue. When you map from a container to the host, no mappings are made on user id's, and the name attached to the uid inside the container may be very different from outside. You need to initialize the directory permissions with something the container user can write to. One simple method is to create a group that has access to write to the files on both the host and container, and then add the various users to this group on both your image and host OS. Another option is to use a named filesystem that you don't access directly from your host and initialize it with the image's directory permissions.


Edit: An example of a named volume with your docker-compose.yml is as simple as:

version: '2'
volumes:
  mysql-data:
    driver: local
  mysql-log:
    driver: local
  mysql-conf:
    driver: local

services:
  db:
    image: mysql:5.6.33
    volumes:
      - "mysql-data:/var/lib/mysql"
      - "mysql-log:/var/log/mysql"
      - "mysql-conf:/etc/mysql/conf.d"
    restart: unless-stopped
    environment:
      MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: rootpw
      MYSQL_DATABASE: db
      MYSQL_USER: db
      MYSQL_PASSWORD: dbpw

Note that I also removed the sha256 from your image name, this reference would block you from being able to pull patched versions of the image. I also prefer the "unless-stopped" restart policy so that Docker does expected things on a reboot.

6
  • The documentation of names volumes seems to be partially outdated and incomplete. Where is this data stored? Am I right, that I still need to know the uid and gid of the mysql container, to start the volume with this rights? – mheinzerling Sep 27 '16 at 4:17
  • Named volumes are stored in internal Docker folders (/var/lib/docker typically). If you try to access them there, you create the same problem that you have with host volumes. Rather, you should only access them via Docker containers. You can mount the same volume in multiple containers, so you can have a container to do things like updates and backups. – BMitch Sep 27 '16 at 12:19
  • I will stay with my sha, to make sure that I test and deploy the same version, but unless-stopped is a good hint. – mheinzerling Sep 27 '16 at 19:45
  • 1
    For versioning between test/stage/prod, I'd recommend using a private registry server and tagging your specific images. You can have the same image with multiple tags making something like v5 tagged as test and then tagged as staging very easy to manage. You can pull from Docker Hub, retag or even do a build with your own additions, and then push to your private registry. All test/stage/prod servers would only pull from that private registry. – BMitch Sep 27 '16 at 19:56
  • I guess the best practice for my conf directory is a new own image based on mysql anyway, otherwise I would have to prefill the volume somehow? – mheinzerling Sep 28 '16 at 4:10
16

I was looking for the exact same thing, and now, there is a better way to do it.

The docker mysql writes:

Many configuration options can be passed as flags to mysqld. This will give you the flexibility to customize the container without needing a cnf file. For example, if you want to change the default encoding and collation for all tables to use UTF-8 (utf8mb4) just run the following:

$ docker run --name some-mysql -e MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=my-secret-pw -d mysql:tag --character-set-server=utf8mb4 --collation-server=utf8mb4_unicode_ci

In a docker-compose world, one could pass these arguments through the "command" section of the service:

command: mysqld --character-set-server=utf8mb4 --collation-server=utf8mb4_unicode_ci

In my use case I just wanted to turn on the logs and specify the path to the log file :

 command: mysqld --general-log=1 --general-log-file=/var/log/mysql/general-log.log

With the adequate volumes (e.g. - ./logs/mysql.log:/var/log/mysql/general-log.log), it becomes easy to reach them.

This is pretty straight forward and avoid dealing with a local configuration. It will works with any MySQL Docker images and will keep the my.cnf as shipped by the image.

1
  • You should also notice the permission of mysql.log. One way to solve it is chmod 777. – Quinn Wynn Apr 28 '20 at 5:42

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