1
  1. Knowning Foo.Id and Bar.Id how can I create their relation without loading the entities from the DB.

    class Foo {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public Lst<Bar> Bars { get; set; }
    }
    
    class Bar {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public Lst<Foo> Foos { get; set; }
    }
    

    Also this configuration are disabled in DbContext constructor:

    Configuration.AutoDetectChangesEnabled = false;
    Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
    
  2. And how it is possible to remove the relationship?


Example:

using (var ctx = new DbCtx())
{
    ctx.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
    ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    ctx.Configuration.AutoDetectChangesEnabled = false;
    ctx.Database.Log += Console.WriteLine;

    var foo = new Foo {Id = 1, Bars = new List<Bar>() };
    var bar = new Bar { Id = 3, Foos = new List<Foo>() };

    // This approach wont work, as AutoDetectChanges are disabled
    ctx.Foos.Attach(foo);
    ctx.Bars.Attach(bar);

    foo.Bars.Add(bar);
    ctx.SaveChanges();
}

How can I define relation here, without changing the configuration.

Thank you in advance.

2
  • your question is not clear ? can you provide more info ?
    – Sampath
    Sep 26, 2016 at 17:04
  • @Sampath, i have update the question with the example I want to avoid, as it makes extra request to the db.
    – tenbits
    Sep 26, 2016 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

2

Ok, have found the solution and here is the helper method:

static void ChangeRelationship<T1, T2>(
    IObjectContextAdapter ctx, 
    T1 a, 
    T2 b, 
    Expression<Func<T1, object>> getNavigationProperty,
    EntityState state) where T1: class
{
    ctx
        .ObjectContext
        .ObjectStateManager
        .ChangeRelationshipState(
            a,
            b,
            getNavigationProperty,
            state
        );
}

And using it in my example from the question:

using (var ctx = new DbCtx())
{
    ctx.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
    ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    ctx.Configuration.AutoDetectChangesEnabled = false;
    ctx.Database.Log += Console.WriteLine;

    var foo = new Foo {Id = 1, Bars = new List<Bar>()};
    var bar = new Bar { Id = 3, Foos = new List<Foo>() };

    ctx.Entry(foo).State = EntityState.Unchanged;
    ctx.Entry(bar).State = EntityState.Unchanged;

    // create
    ChangeRelationship(ctx, foo, bar, x => x.Bars, EntityState.Added);
    ctx.SaveChanges();

    // remove
    ChangeRelationship(ctx, foo, bar, x => x.Bars, EntityState.Deleted);
    ctx.SaveChanges();
}
3
  • 1
    There are more answers along these lines at StackOverflow. It does the job, but it's a mega leakage of a persistence implementation into application logic. It's no longer possible to simply add objects to a collection. IMO, when the many-to-many pattern with a hidden junction class causes problems you should turn to a visible junction class. Having that, you could simply add/remove FooBar junction objects. Alternatively, what's wrong with only one DetectChanges call just before saving? Oct 2, 2016 at 19:09
  • Actually, yes, it is the persistence layer, many people use DBContext and SaveChanges in business domain layer, but I find this way wrong. And personally I find the explicit state changes are much better and cleaner, then when AutodetectChanges is enabled. And finally, it is much more better for performance.
    – tenbits
    Oct 4, 2016 at 18:48
  • That's why I said application logic, not business logic. There's always a place where objects are added/removed from DbSets. Now you'll always have to keep in mind that in this specific case you can't do that. My recommendation would be to turn to a visible junction class to eliminate this difference. Like I read the other day, assume that the next guy on the project is an idiot. Oct 5, 2016 at 7:38
1

If I'm understanding correctly, you wanted to add Bar object to an existing Foo entity without making a lookup for Foo entity.

Let say, you have Foo (id = 1) already exists. Wanted to add new Bar (id = 100) entity to it.

using (var context = new Context())
{
    var bar = new Bar() { Id = 100 };
    var foo = new Foo() { Id = 1 }; // Only ID is required

    context.Foos.Attach(foo);
    bar.Foos.Add(foo);

    context.Bars.Add(bar);
    context.SaveChanges();
}
3
  • Correct, thank you, but when the context has disabled "AutoDetectChanges" and "ProxyCreation" would the ".Add (bar)" detect the new relationship? And another part, how do I delete the relationship?
    – tenbits
    Sep 29, 2016 at 15:59
  • Yes. The dbcontext will do the job even with the disable options. For deletion, follow the Evan's direction. Should work. Let me know how it goes.
    – Cinchoo
    Sep 29, 2016 at 22:19
  • Unfortunately this wont work, as the AutoDetectChanges is disabled on the context.
    – tenbits
    Sep 30, 2016 at 20:05
1
+50

What you are asking is possible. Here are the steps:

(1) Start by creating two entity instances with just PK specified and attach one of them (for instance foo) to the context:

var foo = new Foo { Id = fooId };
var bar = new Bar { Id = barId };
ctx.Foos.Attach(foo);

(2) Set the second entity collection to a new list containing the first entity (i.e. "create" the relation):

bar.Foos = new List<Foo> { foo };

(3) Mark the second entity as follows:

(A) To add relation:

ctx.Entry(bar).State = EntityState.Added;

(B) To remove relation:

ctx.Entry(bar).State = EntityState.Deleted;

(4) Mark the second entity as unchanged:

ctx.Entry(bar).State = EntityState.Unchanged;

And that's it!

Once you call ctx.SaveChanges();, the relation will be added or removed from the junction table.

Update: While the above works (actually my original solution of attaching the second entity with the "original" collection and then simulating modification also works if we call at the end DbContext.ChangeTracker.DetectChanges() explicitly), I should admit that the ObjectContext solution you found looks much more natural (it's strange that such functionality has not been exposed via DbContext), so my personal vote goes there.

5
  • Thanks Ivan, I made an example, and this doesn't work, as the precondition was, that the AutoDetectChanges are off. That's why just calling ,Add(foo) wont detect new relation. Is there any another way to do this?
    – tenbits
    Sep 30, 2016 at 20:07
  • Are your sure you have set ctx.Configuration.AutoDetectChangesEnabled = false; before first Attach? As when I comment this line out, then your example works perfect. I'm using EF 6.0, but I don't think the version matters, as the whole idea about AutoDetectChangesEnabled is to remove any side effects on entities and collections. So when we do bar.Foos.Add(foo), it should perform only usual IList actions, with no EF mixins.
    – tenbits
    Sep 30, 2016 at 21:07
  • @tenbits Please excuse me, and disregard my previous comment. I'm pretty sure I did set it as requested, but at some point looks like I deleted it accidentially. I'm pretty sure there is a solution, will update the answer when restore it.
    – Ivan Stoev
    Sep 30, 2016 at 21:12
  • Yeap, it happens) But anyway, thank you for your help, and also for your time. The solution here is to use ObjectStateManager directly, see my answer. Cheers, Alex
    – tenbits
    Sep 30, 2016 at 21:21
  • @tenbits Yeah, interesting. The old good ObjectContext stuff :) Well, I've posted my little DbContext tricks in case you are interested. Cheers.
    – Ivan Stoev
    Sep 30, 2016 at 21:28

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