Most of the examples I have seen online do something like...

var UserSchema = new mongoose.Schema({
    name: String,
    age: String
});

However, recently I found a book do the above... but without the new keyword.

var UserSchema = mongoose.Schema({
    name: String,
    age: String
});

I am now confused. Do we use the new keyword for creating the schema or not.. and what happens in both cases?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Both are valid and returns a new instance of the Mongoose.Schema class. What this means is that both does exactly the same. This line checks whether you already have an instance of the Schema class, if not, it returns one for you.

To summarize, if you call

var schema = new mongoose.Schema({})

you initialize an instance yourself, while if you call

var schema = mongoose.Schema({})

mongoose initializes one for you, with this:

function Schema(obj, options) {
  if (!(this instanceof Schema)) {
    return new Schema(obj, options);
  }
  ...
  • interesting, thank you... – Grateful Sep 27 '16 at 8:37
  • @Grateful are you sure you understood everything? I want to make sure you understood what I meant. Have you worked with other object-oriented languages like PHP before? The reason I'm asking is because mongoose.Schema is a Class, which you have to initialize instances of to use, by using new Class() – Sven Sep 27 '16 at 8:41
  • I understand your answer. Thank you. – Grateful Sep 27 '16 at 8:43
  • 1
    I'm glad, happy coding fella! – Sven Sep 27 '16 at 8:44

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