18

According to this, a function declared with constexpr must satisfy a few requirements, one of which is as follows:

there exists at least one argument value such that an invocation of the function could be an evaluated subexpression of a core constant expression ...

Well, constexpr function can have no arguments:

constexpr int Bar( /* empty */ ) { return 0xFF; }
constexpr int value = Bar(); // Valid expression

constexpr function that is invoked as a sub-routine can not determine the whole expression to be core constant expression either.

So what does it mean by one argument value must exist?

[Update for future readers]

Apparently the description about the requirements of constexpr function has been fixed since this question from:

there exists at least one argument value such that an invocation of the function could be an evaluated subexpression of a core constant expression ...

to:

there exists at least one set of argument values such that an invocation of the function could be an evaluated subexpression of a core constant expression ...

  • 3
    I think it means that for each argument there exists at least etc. – Martin Bonner supports Monica Sep 27 '16 at 11:26
  • @MartinBonner no, it means for all arguments as a whole – M.M Sep 27 '16 at 11:35
19

The quote from en.cppreference.com is not accurate in regards to the standard, the real quote is (§7.1.5/5):

For a constexpr function or constexpr constructor that is neither defaulted nor a template, if no argument values exist such that an invocation of the function or constructor could be an evaluated subexpression of a core constant expression (5.20) [...] the program is ill-formed; no diagnostic required.

Which basically says that there must exist one valid set of arguments (the empty set being a valid one in your case).

  • 3
    So, they screwed up the inverting of the wording. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Sep 27 '16 at 15:18
  • If empty set is also considered a valid set, are we even able to have less than one set of argument values? (since every function must have at least one set, including an empty set.) I'm just curious if that's just some formality to write the standard. – Dean Seo Sep 28 '16 at 6:24
  • 1
    @DeanSeo You can have less than one valid set of arguments - constexpr int f(std::string) is not valid because std::string cannot be constexpr so whatever the body of f might be, there would never be a valid set of arguments making the invocation of f a constant expression. – Holt Sep 28 '16 at 6:28
  • @Holt Ahh that does make sense. Thanks. – Dean Seo Sep 28 '16 at 6:29
  • 1
    @DeanSeo (Forgot a bit, sorry) And the empty set is not always valid - int f() { return sqrt(pi); } cannot be constexpr because the empty set is the only possible set of arguments here and it would not be a valid one because of sqrt (unless you have a constexpr sqrt) . – Holt Sep 28 '16 at 6:30
7

"One argument value" here means "one set of arguments". Nullary functions have one possible argument set, the empty set.

In your case, this single empty argument set does lead to a valid constexpr call, so everything is fine.

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