61

Is there an easier way to do this in Python (2.7)?: Note: This isn't anything fancy, like putting all local variables into a dictionary. Just the ones I specify in a list.

apple = 1
banana = 'f'
carrot = 3
fruitdict = {}

# I want to set the key equal to variable name, and value equal to variable value
# is there a more Pythonic way to get {'apple': 1, 'banana': 'f', 'carrot': 3}?

for x in [apple, banana, carrot]:
    fruitdict[x] = x # (Won't work)
  • 1
    Can the variables be defined in the dict? Like fruitdict = dict(apple=1, banana=2, carrot=3) ? – dr jimbob Oct 19 '10 at 21:27
  • Not really, there's a lot of code for each variable so it'd be unreadable. – atp Oct 19 '10 at 21:33
  • I assume you're aware that you code doesn't do what you the comment says it does? You can't go backwards from objects to names unless you find what you want in a namespace dictionary like locals() You could however write a function that looks up these variables in the namespace dictionary and assigns the values found to that key; see jimbob's answer. – Thomas Oct 20 '10 at 4:35
  • Yep, sorry, I should clarify. – atp Oct 20 '10 at 21:19

11 Answers 11

69
for i in ('apple', 'banana', 'carrot'):
    fruitdict[i] = locals()[i]
  • 14
    one-line dict([(i, locals()[i]) for i in ('apple', 'banana', 'carrot')]) – dinya Nov 29 '16 at 6:55
  • 2
    While this question is about 2.7, note that the above one-liner does not work in Python 3 because locals() apparently points to the scope of the list comprehension. – Roope Jan 31 at 12:53
14

The globals() function returns a dictionary containing all your global variables.

>>> apple = 1
>>> banana = 'f'
>>> carrot = 3
>>> globals()
{'carrot': 3, 'apple': 1, '__builtins__': <module '__builtin__' (built-in)>, '__name__': '__main__', '__doc__': None, 'banana': 'f'}

There is also a similar function called locals().

I realise this is probably not exactly what you want, but it may provide some insight into how Python provides access to your variables.

Edit: It sounds like your problem may be better solved by simply using a dictionary in the first place:

fruitdict = {}
fruitdict['apple'] = 1
fruitdict['banana'] = 'f'
fruitdict['carrot'] = 3
  • Sorry, I must have edited after you were writing your answer. I only need the variables I specify, not all locals() or globals() – atp Oct 19 '10 at 21:33
  • @Jasie: I added an example of simply using a dictionary in the first place, instead of messing around with variables. – Greg Hewgill Oct 19 '10 at 21:42
6

A one-liner is:-

fruitdict = dict(zip(('apple','banana','carrot'), (1,'f', '3'))
  • Thanks, but the numbers were random assignments (didn't need a range()). – atp Oct 19 '10 at 21:33
  • Now there's two lists – Dantalion Oct 19 '10 at 21:35
3

Here it is in one line, without having to retype any of the variables or their values:

fruitdict.update({k:v for k,v in locals().copy().iteritems() if k[:2] != '__' and k != 'fruitdict'})
2

Based on the answer by mouad, here's a more pythonic way to select the variables based on a prefix:

# All the vars that I want to get start with fruit_
fruit_apple = 1
fruit_carrot = 'f'
rotten = 666

prefix = 'fruit_'
sourcedict = locals()
fruitdict = { v[len(prefix):] : sourcedict[v]
              for v in sourcedict
              if v.startswith(prefix) }
# fruitdict = {'carrot': 'f', 'apple': 1}

You can even put that in a function with prefix and sourcedict as arguments.

1

If you want to bind the locations of the variables themselves, there's this:

>>> apple = 1
>>> banana = 'f'
>>> carrot = 3
>>> fruitdict = {}
>>> fruitdict['apple'] = lambda : apple
>>> fruitdict['banana'] = lambda : banana
>>> fruitdict['carrot'] = lambda : carrot
>>> for k in fruitdict.keys():
...     print k, fruitdict[k]()
... 
carrot 3
apple 1
banana f
>>> apple = 7
>>> for k in fruitdict.keys():
...     print k, fruitdict[k]()
... 
carrot 3
apple 7
banana f
  • Thanks, but the numbers were random assignments (didn't need a range()). – atp Oct 19 '10 at 21:34
1

Try:

to_dict = lambda **k: k
apple = 1
banana = 'f'
carrot = 3
to_dict(apple=apple, banana=banana, carrot=carrot)
#{'apple': 1, 'banana': 'f', 'carrot': 3}
  • 1
    How is different from simply doing dict(apple=apple, banana=banana, carrot=carrot)? – Basit Ali Feb 14 at 7:45
0

Well this is a bit, umm ... non-Pythonic ... ugly ... hackish ...

Here's a snippet of code assuming you want to create a dictionary of all the local variables you create after a specific checkpoint is taken:

checkpoint = [ 'checkpoint' ] + locals().keys()[:]
## Various local assigments here ...
var_keys_since_checkpoint = set(locals().keys()) - set(checkpoint)
new_vars = dict()
for each in var_keys_since_checkpoint:
   new_vars[each] = locals()[each]

Note that we explicitly add the 'checkpoint' key into our capture of the locals().keys() I'm also explicitly taking a slice of that though it shouldn't be necessary in this case since the reference has to be flattened to add it to the [ 'checkpoint' ] list. However, if you were using a variant of this code and tried to shortcut out the ['checkpoint'] + portion (because that key was already inlocals(), for example) ... then, without the [:] slice you could end up with a reference to thelocals().keys()` whose values would change as you added variables.

Offhand I can't think of a way to call something like new_vars.update() with a list of keys to be added/updated. So thefor loop is most portable. I suppose a dictionary comprehension could be used in more recent versions of Python. However that woudl seem to be nothing more than a round of code golf.

0

why you don't do the opposite :

fruitdict = { 
      'apple':1,
      'banana':'f',
      'carrot':3,
}

locals().update(fruitdict)

Update :

don't use the code above check the comment.

by the way why you don't mark the vars that you want to get i don't know maybe like this:

# All the vars that i want to get are followed by _fruit
apple_fruit = 1
carrot_fruit = 'f'

for var in locals():
    if var.endswith('fruit'):
       you_dict.update({var:locals()[var])
  • 4
    Updating locals() like that is truly evil. – Greg Hewgill Oct 19 '10 at 21:52
  • As a friend of mine says: 'dark voodoo' – Caleb Hattingh Oct 19 '10 at 21:56
  • agree, but my understanding of his question is that he want to get only variable that are fruit and legume ; which is basically impossible unless he could teach his program to make difference between fruit and legume and other stuff , or maybe i just complicate thing maybe he just want "carrot , banana , apple" vars :) – mouad Oct 19 '10 at 22:11
  • 3
    updating locals() is forbidden docs.python.org/library/functions.html#locals – John La Rooy Oct 19 '10 at 22:36
0

This question has practically been answered, but I just wanted to say it was funny that you said

This isn't anything fancy, like putting all local variables into a dictionary.

Because it is actually "fancier"

what you want is:

apple = 1
banana = 'f'
carrot = 3
fruitdict = {}

# I want to set the key equal to variable name, and value equal to variable value
# is there a more Pythonic way to get {'apple': 1, 'banana': 'f', 'carrot': 3}?

names= 'apple banana carrot'.split() # I'm just being lazy for this post
items = globals()                    # or locals()

for name in names:
    fruitdict[name] = items[name]

Honestly, what you are doing is just copying items from one dictionary to another.

(Greg Hewgill practically gave the whole answer, I just made it complete)

...and like people suggested, you should probably be putting these in the dictionary in the first place, but I'll assume that for some reason you can't

  • so I guess I didn't see jimbob's post... practically the same thing, just doesn't call locals/globals more than once – Terence Honles Oct 20 '10 at 0:44
  • I'm don't think calling globals more than once would actually be more efficient. – dr jimbob Oct 21 '10 at 13:27
  • E.g., if you do items = locals(); id(locals()) == id(items) you would get equality. Or if you did items=locals(); b = 3 ; items['b'] it will find the new variable b, since it didn't actually copy the locals dict to items (which would be slower). If you had done items=locals().copy() there may have been a minor difference; but then again the copying step is probably slower than accessing the small number of items from the locals dict. – dr jimbob Oct 21 '10 at 13:33
-2
a = "something"
randround = {}
randround['A'] = "%s" % a

Worked.

  • It should be {'a' : 'something'} and you are getting {'A' : 'something'}... you are hard coding the Key A – DarkCygnus Jul 19 '17 at 17:35

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