I am trying to have Cloudflare to act as CDN for files hosted on S3, in a way that nobody can access the files directly. For example:

S3 bucket: cdn.mydomain.com.s3.amazonaws.com

CDN (Cloudflare): cdn.mydomain.com

What I want is to be able to access cdn.mydomain.com/file.jpg (Cloudflare) but not cdn.mydomain.com.s3.amazonaws.com/file.jpg (S3).

Right now I have a CNAME configured on Cloudflare that points to my bucket, and the following CORS:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<CORSConfiguration xmlns="http://s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2006-03-01/">
    <CORSRule>
        <AllowedOrigin>*</AllowedOrigin>
        <AllowedMethod>GET</AllowedMethod>
        <MaxAgeSeconds>3000</MaxAgeSeconds>
        <AllowedHeader>Authorization</AllowedHeader>
    </CORSRule>
</CORSConfiguration>

If I try to access any file, via S3 or CDN, I get permission denied. If I make a file public (aka grantee Everyone), I can then access that file via S3 and CDN.

I have tried changing the AllowedOrigin with *.mydomain.com, but no luck.

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I found the solution. The article at CloudFlare's support center doesn't mention this.

You have to edit the bucket policy, not the CORS. And instead of allowing your domain, like that article says, to have access to the bucket, you have to allow CloudFlare IP's. For the reference, here is the list of IP's: https://www.cloudflare.com/ips

Here is the bucket policy sample to work with CloudFlare:

    {
        "Sid": "SOME_STRING_ID_HERE",
        "Effect": "Allow", // or deny
        "Principal": {"AWS": "*"}, // or whatever principal you want
        "Action": "s3:GetObject", // or whatever action you want
        "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::cdn.mydomain.com/*", // or whatever resource you want
        "Condition": {
            "IpAddress": {
                "aws:SourceIp": [
                    "103.21.244.0/22",
                    "103.22.200.0/22",
                    "103.31.4.0/22",
                    "104.16.0.0/12",
                    "108.162.192.0/18",
                    "131.0.72.0/22",
                    "141.101.64.0/18",
                    "162.158.0.0/15",
                    "172.64.0.0/13",
                    "173.245.48.0/20",
                    "188.114.96.0/20",
                    "190.93.240.0/20",
                    "197.234.240.0/22",
                    "198.41.128.0/17",
                    "199.27.128.0/21"
                ]
            }
        }
    }
  • Can you edit your answer? I'm getting this is not a valid jason, even mixing with first answer. I found out there's a part missing and also comments are not allowed. – Marcelo Agimóvel Sep 13 at 11:17
  • Well, the comments were only to explain it here. You can just remove them. I still have this code in use in the bucket policy, and it is working fine. Be sure you check the list of IP's on Cloudflare. They added IPv6 months ago. – rlcabral Sep 24 at 13:36

The accepted solution doesn't exactly work. It just allows access to CloudFlare. For that solution to work, you must explicitly deny everything elsewhere in the policy. This bucket policy is updated for Cloudflare's most recent IP addresses (including IPv6) and it also denies all access not from a Cloudflare IP address out of the box.

{
    "Id": "Policy1517260196123",
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "A string ID here",
            "Action": "s3:*",
            "Effect": "Deny",
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::yourbucket.example.com/*",
            "Condition": {
                "NotIpAddress": {
                    "aws:SourceIp": [
                        "103.21.244.0/22",
                        "103.22.200.0/22",
                        "103.31.4.0/22",
                        "104.16.0.0/12",
                        "108.162.192.0/18",
                        "131.0.72.0/22",
                        "141.101.64.0/18",
                        "162.158.0.0/15",
                        "172.64.0.0/13",
                        "173.245.48.0/20",
                        "188.114.96.0/20",
                        "190.93.240.0/20",
                        "197.234.240.0/22",
                        "198.41.128.0/17",
                        "2400:cb00::/32",
                        "2405:8100::/32",
                        "2405:b500::/32",
                        "2606:4700::/32",
                        "2803:f800::/32",
                        "2c0f:f248::/32",
                        "2a06:98c0::/29"
                    ]
                }
            },
            "Principal": {
                "AWS": "*"
            }
        }
    ]
}
  • Well, I forgot to mention that the bucket was not public. So no one could access it anyway. Your approach works too. It just assumes that the bucket is public, then your policies block access to it if NotIpAddress. Same idea ;) – rlcabral Jan 30 at 20:05

It's better to use your domain name as the entry guard to s3, rather than a list of IPs.

Go to your site's S3 Console
Select the Properties Panel
Under Permission
Choose Add CORS Configuration
Add your CORSRules for your domain names

S3-CORS-Config example

More CORS configuration can be found here


Kinda a mistake, but this answer only forbid other sites from referencing you assets, not from the original endpoint S3 generate for you...

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