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I want to secure the hosted Rest services using Token authorization system. So, I decided to go with JWT process. After the following documentation, I got confused how digital signature works. AFAIK we need to encrypt the private key using SignatureAlgorithm. and to verify it we only need public key on our end user application. I will save the public key in an android local database.

Now, Let's talk about reverse engineering. If someone is able to access the client database and figure it out what is the public key . Now they just need to figure out what kind of algorithm server are using for digital signature and it's very simple to do it by just decrypting the header section.

Am I missing something here? If No, Then How JWT is safe to use?

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I got confused how digital signature works.

Indeed.

AFAIK we need to encrypt the private key using SignatureAlgorithm.

No. You need to encrypt data, and encrypt it with the private key. Usually what you encrypt is an HMAC of the data, to save space.

and to verify it we only need public key on our end user application.

Correct. But what you're verifying is that that data was signed with that private key.

Now, Let's talk about reverse engineering. If someone is able to access the client database and figure it out what is the public key. Now they just need to figure out what kind of algorithm server are using for digital signature and it's very simple to do it by just decrypting the header section.

No, because you didn't encrypt the header section. You encrypted an HMAC.

  • Got it. But while verifying the signed data we need to provide the public key. Right? Followed this one : https://github.com/jwtk/jjwt – Amit Pal Sep 27 '16 at 23:51
  • For the reverse engineering. Let's say xxxx.yyy.zzz is my JWT string separated by .. If I apply base 64 decoders on first part of the string then it will give me an used algorithm. Now If I know the public key can't I figure out my secret key? – Amit Pal Sep 28 '16 at 0:08
  • @AmitPal Of course not. Otherwise the whole public/private key system would be pointless. – user207421 Sep 28 '16 at 4:57
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Android was built on the idea that all apps should run independently from one another, meaning that one android app cannot get into the process of another. This is, of course, not true if the device is rooted, in which case the authenticity of the token.

Also, you don't need to decrypt the JWT as the payload is only base64 encoded. Anyone who knows how to base64 decode will be able to see the header and payload that you are sending. this is why you do not put anything in the payload that is personal (email addresses, passwords, credit card numbers). If you do want to include personal information in the payload look at JWE; it encrypts the payload so provide security. Back to the main point: the signature will fail if the body has been tampered with. Further questions on how asymmetric encryption math wise are better suited for the SE Mathematics site.

Edit: Look at jwt.io for a good overview of JWTs

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    It's not up to me. JWT uses base64 encryption for header and payload section and no one can tamper it until they have the security section for JWT. My question is how to make secure security section in JWT because encoding and decoding of signature depend on private and public key. – Amit Pal Sep 27 '16 at 23:06
  • anyone can decode, read and replace the payload or header with modified base64 encoded data, but that will fail when you verify it. Look at jwt.io/introduction for tips on JWT and who to sign it according to RFC standards. – Corgs Sep 27 '16 at 23:08
  • Yes! We are on the same page but to decrypt on clients side we need the public key ( a pair of a private key used at the time of generating signature). To do it we need to store this public key somewhere on the client side. Now, I decompiled the app and figure it out what is the public key. Isn't easy to someone to breach the security? – Amit Pal Sep 27 '16 at 23:13
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    That's why it's called a public key. Anyone with a public key can unencrypt anything that is signed by the private key (pub and priv key are mathematically linked). What I am saying is that Android isolates all apps, meaning no app (other than yours) will be able to see the public key (as long as you store it properly), unless your phone is stolen and your app is decompiled or the phone is rooted. – Corgs Sep 27 '16 at 23:17
  • So are you saying that JWT is not secure? because I decompiled the app and now I have the public key and algorithm too – Amit Pal Sep 27 '16 at 23:19

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