116

Googling for "javascript clone object" brings some really weird results, some of them are hopelessly outdated and some are just too complex, isn't it as easy as just:

let clone = {...original};

Is there anything wrong with this?

  • this isn't legal ES6. But if it weren, this isn't a clone: both your clone and original properties point to the same things now. For instance, original = { a: [1,2,3] } gives you a clone with clone.a literally being original.a. Modification through either clone or original modifies the same thing, so no, this is bad =) – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Sep 28 '16 at 0:58
  • 2
    @AlbertoRivera It's kinda valid JavaScript, in that it's a stage 2 proposal that's likely to be a future addition to the JavaScript standard. – Frxstrem Sep 28 '16 at 1:00
  • @Frxstrem with the question being about ES6, this is not valid JavaScript =) – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Sep 28 '16 at 1:01
  • 3
    Shallow or deep cloning? – Felix Kling Sep 28 '16 at 1:05
  • 1
    You're right, it's not valid ES6, it's valid ES9. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – mikemaccana Jul 31 '18 at 15:20
183

This is good for shallow cloning. The object spread is a standard part of ECMAScript 2018.

For deep cloning you'll need a different solution.

const clone = {...original} to shallow clone

const newobj = {...original, prop: newOne} to immutably add another prop to the original and store as a new object.

  • 16
    However, isn't this just a shallow clone? As in, properties are not cloned recursively, are they? Therefore, original.innerObject === clone.innerObject and changing original.innerObject.property will change clone.innerObject.property. – milanio Apr 3 '18 at 14:46
  • 16
    yes, this is a shallow clone. if you want a deep clone you must use JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(input)) – Mark Shust Apr 4 '18 at 15:30
  • 7
    /!\ JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(input)) messes up dates, undefined, ... It is not the silver bullet for cloning! See: maxpou.fr/immutability-js-without-library – Guillaume Jun 12 '18 at 8:20
  • 1
    So is the hack JSON.stringify()/JSON.parse() really the recommended way to deep clone an object in ES6? I keep seeing it recommended. Disturbing. – Solvitieg Jun 28 '18 at 18:27
  • 1
    The result is a simple object, not the instance of the original object class (that is true for JSON.stringify/parse, Object.assign and {...originalObj}). The best way to have REAL clone of the object I would suggest to implement clone() method which would make sure correct instance is returned as mentioned by marcel stackoverflow.com/a/46785117/343039 – Petr Urban Jul 6 '18 at 12:35
54

EDIT: When this answer was posted, {...obj} syntax was not available in most browsers. Nowadays, you should be fine using it (unless you need to support IE 11).

Use Object.assign.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/assign

var obj = { a: 1 };
var copy = Object.assign({}, obj);
console.log(copy); // { a: 1 }

However, this won't make a deep clone. There is no native way of deep cloning as of yet.

EDIT: As @Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans mentioned in the comments, you can deep clone simple objects (ie. no prototypes, functions or circular references) using JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(input))

  • 17
    There is one, provided your object is a true object literal, and purely data, in which case JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(input)) is a proper deep clone. However, the moment prototypes, functions or circular references are in play, that solution no longer works. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Sep 28 '16 at 1:00
  • @Mike'Pomax'Kamermans That's true. Losing functionality for getters and setters is terrible, though... – Alberto Rivera Sep 28 '16 at 1:03
  • If you need a generic function to deep clone any object, check out stackoverflow.com/a/13333781/560114. – Matt Browne Sep 28 '16 at 1:10
  • There is now a way to do deep cloning natively. – Dan Dascalescu Jun 14 at 5:32
  • 1
    @DanDascalescu even though it is experimental, it looks pretty promising. Thanks for the info! – Alberto Rivera Jun 14 at 16:25
3

if you don't want to use json.parse(json.stringify(object)) you could create recursively key-value copies:

function copy(item){
  let result = null;
  if(!item) return result;
  if(Array.isArray(item)){
    result = [];
    item.forEach(element=>{
      result.push(copy(element));
    });
  }
  else if(item instanceof Object && !(item instanceof Function)){ 
    result = {};
    for(let key in item){
      if(key){
        result[key] = copy(item[key]);
      }
    }
  }
  return result || item;
}

But the best way is to create a class that can return a clone of it self

class MyClass{
    data = null;
    constructor(values){ this.data = values }
    toString(){ console.log("MyClass: "+this.data.toString(;) }
    remove(id){ this.data = data.filter(d=>d.id!==id) }
    clone(){ return new MyClass(this.data) }
}
2

Following on from the answer by @marcel I found some functions were still missing on the cloned object. e.g.

function MyObject() {
  var methodAValue = null,
      methodBValue = null

  Object.defineProperty(this, "methodA", {
    get: function() { return methodAValue; },
    set: function(value) {
      methodAValue = value || {};
    },
    enumerable: true
  });

  Object.defineProperty(this, "methodB", {
    get: function() { return methodAValue; },
    set: function(value) {
      methodAValue = value || {};
    }
  });
}

where on MyObject I could clone methodA but methodB was excluded. This occurred because it is missing

enumerable: true

which meant it did not show up in

for(let key in item)

Instead I switched over to

Object.getOwnPropertyNames(item).forEach((key) => {
    ....
  });

which will include non-enumerable keys.

I also found that the prototype (proto) was not cloned. For that I ended up using

if (obj.__proto__) {
  copy.__proto__ = Object.assign(Object.create(Object.getPrototypeOf(obj)), obj);
}

PS: Frustrating that I could not find a built in function to do this.

1

If the methods you used isn't working well with objects involving data types like Date, try this

Import _

import * as _ from 'lodash';

Deep clone object

myObjCopy = _.cloneDeep(myObj);
-1
We can do that with two way:
1- First create a new object and replicate the structure of the existing one by iterating 
 over its properties and copying them on the primitive level.

let user = {
     name: "John",
     age: 30
    };

    let clone = {}; // the new empty object

    // let's copy all user properties into it
    for (let key in user) {
      clone[key] = user[key];
    }

    // now clone is a fully independant clone
    clone.name = "Pete"; // changed the data in it

    alert( user.name ); // still John in the original object

2- Second we can use the method Object.assign for that 
    let user = { name: "John" };
    let permissions1 = { canView: true };
    let permissions2 = { canEdit: true };

    // copies all properties from permissions1 and permissions2 into user
    Object.assign(user, permissions1, permissions2);

  -Another example

    let user = {
      name: "John",
      age: 30
    };

    let clone = Object.assign({}, user);
It copies all properties of user into the empty object and returns it. Actually, the same as the loop, but shorter.

But Object.assign() not create a deep clone

let user = {
  name: "John",
  sizes: {
    height: 182,
    width: 50
  }
};

let clone = Object.assign({}, user);

alert( user.sizes === clone.sizes ); // true, same object

// user and clone share sizes
user.sizes.width++;       // change a property from one place
alert(clone.sizes.width); // 51, see the result from the other one

To fix that, we should use the cloning loop that examines each value of user[key] and, if it’s an object, then replicate its structure as well. That is called a “deep cloning”.

There’s a standard algorithm for deep cloning that handles the case above and more complex cases, called the Structured cloning algorithm. In order not to reinvent the wheel, we can use a working implementation of it from the JavaScript library lodash the method is called _.cloneDeep(obj).

-1

All the methods above do not handle deep cloning of objects where it is nested to n levels. I did not check its performance over others but it is short and simple.

The first example below shows object cloning using Object.assign which clones just till first level.

var person = {
    name:'saksham',
    age:22,
    skills: {
        lang:'javascript',
        experience:5
    }
}

newPerson = Object.assign({},person);
newPerson.skills.lang = 'angular';
console.log(newPerson.skills.lang); //logs Angular

Using the below approach deep clones object

var person = {
    name:'saksham',
    age:22,
    skills: {
        lang:'javascript',
        experience:5
    }
}

anotherNewPerson = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(person));
anotherNewPerson.skills.lang = 'angular';
console.log(person.skills.lang); //logs javascript

  • JSON.parse/stringify has been mentioned as a poor deep cloning method for years. Please check previous answers, as well as related questions. Also, this is not new to ES6. – Dan Dascalescu Jun 14 at 5:34
  • @DanDascalescu I know this and I think it shouldn’t be an issue to use it for simple objects. Others have also mentioned this in their answers in the same post and even as comments. I think it does not deserve a downvote. – Saksham Jun 14 at 18:43
  • Exactly - "other have also mentioned" JSON.parse/stringify in their answers. Why post yet another answer with the same solution? – Dan Dascalescu Jun 15 at 6:43

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