24

I wrote some validation code for a password and confirm password that checks if they match or not. Furthermore there is a condition that checks if length of my password is less than 6 characters and writes/displays an error if they are less than 6 characters. But my code doesn't work correctly: when I switch to field 2 the condition of field 1 isn't checked and if both of conditions are correct the error still presents.

Here is my code:

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";

    if(pass1.value == pass2.value){
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }
    else{
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }
	
    if(pass1.length > 5){
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
    }
    else{
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
    }
}  
         <input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1"/>
         <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
                  <div id="error-nwl"></div>
        

  • 2
    May you describe "doesn't work correctly" - what behavior is missing? – Theraot Sep 28 '16 at 7:33
  • 2
    you are missing "value" in pass1.length change to pass1.value.length for other element too :) – user1363245 Sep 28 '16 at 7:34
  • I find it a bit odd that this question has two upvotes. It isn't bad but it isn't well formatted or presented. Moreover, even if it was, the error it describes is very basic and very localised to this code, thus I don't think it's useful in general. – VLAZ Sep 28 '16 at 7:36
  • @Theraot the condition does not work together .i mean when i switch to field 2 the condition of filed 1 doesn't check and if both of condition are correct the error still exist – inaz Sep 28 '16 at 7:41
  • @inaz ok, although you should edit the question and add it there. – Theraot Sep 28 '16 at 7:43

25 Answers 25

12

Use below code. Firstly, pass1.length is not correct. You should write pass1.value.length. Secondly, I added comparing the 2 blocks at the end, as firstly you should check the length of first block. Also, the function should be called on changes of first block also.

Good luck!

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
 	
    if(pass1.value.length > 5)
    {
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
    }
    else
    {
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
        return;
    }
  
    if(pass1.value == pass2.value)
    {
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }
	else
    {
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }
}  
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
<div id="error-nwl"></div>
        

12

Try this:

if(pass1.value.length > 5)
  • when i switch to field 2 the condition of filed 1 doesn't check and if both of condition are correct the error still exist – inaz Sep 28 '16 at 8:04
  • You needed some serious refactoring, see Vural Acar's answer. – Aleksandar Matic Sep 28 '16 at 8:11
  • I think 'Try this:' and small code snippet is not a helpful answer. – sohnryang Nov 6 '16 at 1:33
8

before:

 if(pass1.length > 5)

after:

 if(pass1.value.length > 5)

and you should check equality after everything fits, like length or allowed chars etc.

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";

    if(pass1.value.length > 5 && pass2.value.length > 5)
    {
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"

        if(pass1.value == pass2.value)
        {
            pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
            message.style.color = goodColor;
            message.innerHTML = "ok!"
        }
        else
        {
            pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
            message.style.color = badColor;
            message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
        }
    }
    else
    {
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
    }

}
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1"/>
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
<div id="error-nwl"></div>

  • is there a way to validate lenght of password in first field. and then show the error that time? – inaz Sep 28 '16 at 7:55
7
if (pass1.value.length > 5)

Make sure don't apply trim() because trim will remove blank spaces and blank space in the password is not a valid character.

  • No. He can apply trim to prevent user putting white space before and after the input value. Imagine if the user input a value of 6 spaces. It will be valid and that's not how the password should work. If you ever find a famous website without trimming a password. Tag me here with the link. – devhermluna Oct 8 '16 at 5:31
  • While inserting in DB he should apply trim but he used the word validation then if a user enters blank spaces then there should be validation for blank space, Blank space also increases the character count in UI textbox. – WSk Oct 24 '16 at 15:46
  • Prevention is better than cure. So, why waste user time if you can validate in client-side? And. One more, he should also validate in server-side for more security. Sometimes, client-side script failed to load. – devhermluna Oct 25 '16 at 2:09
  • OK, Suppose a user enters blank space in textbox like this " password" and without throwing validation alert u trim the password and inserted in DB, Now user is trying to login with " password" now who let him know that u removed his blank space. Remember, at time of coding keep one thing in mind "End User don't know anything" – WSk Oct 25 '16 at 13:50
6

When you are checking the length of the pass1, you are not actually checking it's value - pass1.length > 5 - you should change it to pass1.value.length > 5

  • when i switch to field 2 the condition of filed 1 doesn't check and if both of condition are correct the error still exist . – inaz Sep 28 '16 at 8:02
6

You can do:

if (pass1.value.trim().length > 5)
6
+25

To check length you should have to write like this

if (pass1.value.length > 5)

and then your code working fine

5

You can take advantage of regular expression to do the validation for you. For example : I am allowing some special characters in this password and count is greater then 6

regex = pass1.value.search(/^[a-zA-Z0-9+&@#/%?=~_|!:,.;]{6,}+$/);

if(regex){
    message.innerHTML="Invalid Password.";
}else{
    message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!";
}
4

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
    if(pass1.value == pass2.value){
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }
	else{
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }
	
	if(pass1.value.length > 5){
		pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
		message.style.color = goodColor;
		message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
		}
		else{
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
    }
	
}  
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1"/>
         <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
                  <div id="error-nwl"></div>

4

The apparently simple task of password validation can get complex, and it may be difficult to pinpoint why code fails to work as intended. A major part of the challenge lies in specifying the conditional logic, then to convert this logic to working code.

You want to achieve the following:

  1. Make the user enter a password of at least 6 characters length
  2. Make the user confirm the password
  3. Provide the user with relevant feedback assisting the user through the process

One way to convert this to conditional logic (in pseudocode) is as follows:

if (password length is less than 6)
  inform user that password should be at least 6 characters
else if (passwords do not match)
  ask user to confirm password
else
  inform user that passwords match, all is ok

But my code doesn't work correctly: when I switch to field 2 the condition of field 1 isn't checked and if both of conditions are correct the error still presents.

Your code follows a different logic (in pseudocode):

if (passwords match)
  inform user that passwords match, all is ok
else
  inform user that passwords do not match

if (password is more than 5 characters)
  inform user that the password is long enough
else
  inform user that the password should be at least 6 characters

One problem in your code is that password length is the last thing you check, so the first if/else check is redundant (it will never produce any relevant feedback, even when the passwords match), since your code always will end up with providing feedback about password length.

Another problem is that your code would accept passwords that match even if they are less than 6 characters, that is why you want to check password length first, and afterwards check whether both passwords match.

In addition, your code only runs these checks when the user writes to field 2 ('#pass2'), you need to add an event handler to 'onkeyup' of field 1 as well.

Thus, your code logic needs to be rewritten. Here is one of several ways this could be done:

function checkPass() {
  var neutralColor = '#fff'; // 'white';
  var badColor     = '#f66'; // 'red';
  var goodColor    = '#6f6'; // 'green';
  
  var password1 = getElm('pass1').value;
  var password2 = getElm('pass2').value;

  //if password length is less than 6
  if (password1.length < 6) {
    feedback('Enter a password of at least 6 characters');
    //we do not care about pass2 when pass1 is too short
    setBGColor('pass2', neutralColor);
    //if pass1 is blank, set neutral background
    if (password1.length === 0) {
      setBGColor('pass1', neutralColor);
    } else {
      setBGColor('pass1', badColor);
    }
  //else if passwords do not match
  } else if (password2 !== password1) {
    //we now know that pass1 is long enough
    feedback('Confirm password');
    setBGColor('pass1', goodColor);
    //if pass2 is blank, set neutral background
    if (password2.length === 0) {
      setBGColor('pass2', neutralColor);
    } else {
      setBGColor('pass2', badColor);
    }
  //else all is well
  } else {
    feedback('Passwords match');
    setBGColor('pass1', goodColor);
    setBGColor('pass2', goodColor);
  }
}

//helper function for document.getElementById()
function getElm(id) {
  return document.getElementById(id);
}

//helper function for setting background color
function setBGColor(id, value) {
  getElm(id).style.backgroundColor = value;
}

//helper function for feedback message
function feedback(msg) {
  getElm('error-nwl').innerHTML = msg;
}
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1" onkeyup="checkPass()"/>
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass()" />
<div id="error-nwl">Enter a password of at least 6 characters</div>

3

Use Below Code

valid=pass1.value.search(/^[A-Za-z0-9@_]{6,20}$/);

if(valid != 0){
    message.innerHTML="Invalid Password.";
}else if(pass1.value.length < 6){
      message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
}
  • 1
    I think 'Use Below Code' is not appropriate answer. – sohnryang Oct 8 '16 at 4:54
3

Find the added comment for changes done as it it working fine now.

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
    if(pass1.value == pass2.value){
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }
	else{
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }
	
	if(pass1.value.length > 5){           ////////just added value here//
		pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
		message.style.color = goodColor;
		message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
		}
		else{
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
    }
	
}
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1"/>
         <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
                  <div id="error-nwl"></div>

3

Your issue is checking the length of a single DOM node, instead of the length of the DOM nodes value.

What you currently have is the equivalent of

var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');

if ( pass1.length > 5 ) {...

A single DOM node only has a length of 1, if it's found, it could never be more than 5.
What you wanted was to check the length of the value

var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');

if ( pass1.value.length > 5 ) {...

But you really want to do that when typing in in the first password field, not the second one.

Using proper event handlers, better checks, and classes for the messages, this would be the way to do it

var pass1   = document.getElementById('pass1');
var pass2   = document.getElementById('pass2');
var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');

function msg(_msg, good, time) {
    message.innerHTML = _msg;
    message.classList.toggle('bad', !good);
    message.classList.add('visible');
    setTimeout(function() {message.classList.remove('visible')}, time);
}

pass1.addEventListener('input', function() {
    this.classList.remove('bad');
    this.classList.remove('good');
    if (this.value.length > 5) {
        this.classList.add('good');
        msg("Character number ok!", true, 1800);
    }
});

pass1.addEventListener('blur', function() {
    if (this.value.length <= 5) {
        this.classList.remove('good');
        this.classList.add('bad');
        msg("You have to enter at least 6 digit!", false, 1800);
    } else if (pass1.value !== pass2.value) {
    	pass2.classList.remove('good');
        pass2.classList.add('bad');
        msg("Passwords don't match", false, 3000);
    }
});

pass2.addEventListener('input', function() {
    if (this.value.length > 5) {
        var matches  = pass1.value === pass2.value;
        var _message = matches ? "Passwords match!" : "Passwords don't match";
        pass2.classList.toggle('good', matches);
        pass2.classList.toggle('bad', !matches);
        msg(_message, matches, 3000);
    } else {
        message.classList.remove('visible');
        this.classList.remove('good');
        this.classList.remove('bad');
    }
});

pass2.addEventListener('blur', function() {
    var matches  = pass1.value === pass2.value;
    if (!matches) {
        pass2.classList.remove('good');
        pass2.classList.add('bad');
        msg("Passwords don't match", matches, 3000);
    }
});
#pass1.bad,
#pass2.bad {
  background: #ff6666;
}
#pass1.good,
#pass2.good {
  background: #66cc66;
}
#error-nwl {
  opacity: 0;
  color: #66cc66;
  transition: opacity 0.3s ease-in-out;
}
#error-nwl.bad {
  color: #ff6666;
}
#error-nwl.visible {
  opacity: 1;
}
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password" id="pass1" />
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" />
<div id="error-nwl"></div>

3

It appears that there are a few things you want to do.

  1. Password must be at least 6 character long, else a message ' you have to enter at least 6 digit!' in red shows up.
  2. Retype must match password, else a message ' These passwords don't match' in red shows up.
  3. If 'Both' condition passes, then show a green message 'ok!'. (My guess).
  4. If the fields are empty, then no special color. (My guess.)
  5. If password is valid but retype is empty, then show green message ' character number ok!' (Again, my guess).

My suggestions,

  • if you are going to use onkeyup on pass2, then why not do the same thing in pass1?
  • consider to use onfocusout event instead of onkeyup.

The following code should do what you are looking for.

function checkPass() {
  var getTag = Id => document.getElementById(Id);
  var pass1 = getTag('pass1');
  var pass2 = getTag('pass2');
  var message = getTag('error-nwl');
  var str;

  //Logic that handles Password.
  if (!pass1.value)
    pass1.removeAttribute('valid');
  else if (pass1.value.length < 6) {
    pass1.setAttribute('valid', false)
    str = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!";
  } else {
    if (!pass2.value)
      str=" character number ok!";
    pass1.setAttribute('valid', true);}

  //Logic that handles Retype.
  if (!pass2.value)
    pass2.removeAttribute('valid');
  else if (pass1.value != pass2.value) {
    pass2.setAttribute('valid', false);
    str = " These passwords don't match";
  } else
    pass2.setAttribute('valid', true);

  
  //Logic that handles the display of message.
  message.removeAttribute('valid');
  if (pass1.value && pass2.value && !str) {
    message.setAttribute('valid', true);
    message.innerHTML = "ok!"
  } else if (str) {
    message.innerHTML = str;
  } else
    message.innerHTML = '';
  return !!message.valid;

}
#pass1[valid=true] {
  background: #66cc66
}
#pass1[valid=false] {
  background: #ff6666
}
#pass2[valid=true] {
  background: #66cc66
}
#pass2[valid=false] {
  background: #ff6666
}
#error-nwl {
  color: #ff6666
}
#error-nwl[valid=true] {
  color: #66cc66
}
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password" id="pass1" onkeyup="checkPass()" />
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass()" />
<div id="error-nwl"></div>

3

Building form validation

When to validate?

First off, there are three places where we want to validate:

  • Validating the form when the user submits.
  • Validating the fields when the user edits them.
  • Validating the data when the server receives it.

The reason why we need to validate the data on the server side (regardless of how good the other two validations are) is because a malicious user can access the HTML and JavaScript code, forge requests, or bypass the client side validation by other means.

Why do we need client side validation if the validation will happen on the sever side anyway? The short answer is that client side validation reduces the number of bad submissions, and so reduces the traffic. A second motivation is that client side validation allows giving feedback to user much faster and easier.

With that said, the current post will only deal with client side validation.

Now, in order to run the validation code we need to handle the appropriate events. The recommended way to add event handlers in JavaScript is calling addEventListener on the target element. Sadly browser support is not good on old versions of Internet Explorer.

So, we are going to pull code from You Might Not Need jQuery to add event handlers:

function addEventListener(el, eventName, handler) {
  if (el.addEventListener) {
    el.addEventListener(eventName, handler);
  } else {
    el.attachEvent('on' + eventName, function(){
      handler.call(el);
    });
  }
}

Note: attachEvent is a proprietary extension by Microsoft.


Now we need to decide the events we want to handle...

The initial temptation is to handle each subtle change of the fields. The drawback of this is that by just typing a single character the system may be telling the user that it is wrong (because the value is too short, or whatever). This could be interpreted as if that single character that was typed was wrong, and then the user stops to parse what is wrong before proceedings.

Luke Wroblewski, "Inline Validation in Web Forms", 2009 shows that using the "blur" event (loss of focus) for validation results in users filling the forms faster.

The following is an extract from the article:

(...) The fact that participants were confused when simple questions were marked “correct” supports this interpretation:

“Are you telling me I entered a valid name or my name correctly?”

“Is this a confirmation of a correctly formatted postal code or my correct postal code?”

These types of participant questions caused some minor problems during testing. Our participants knew we had no way to know their correct name or postal code, so they knew that the green check mark didn’t mean “correct.” But what did they think it meant? They weren’t sure—and that was the problem. Not knowing what the message meant, our participants stopped to ask questions of the moderator instead of confidently answering what were very easy questions.

(...)

When several participants noticed an error message while trying to answer a question, they entered one additional character into the input field, than waited for the message to update. If the updated message continued to show an error, they entered another character, then waited for the validation message to update again, and so on, resulting in longer average completion times.

(...)

“It’s frustrating that you don’t get the chance to put anything in [the field] before it’s flashing red at you.”

“When I clicked in the First Name field, it immediately came up saying that [my first name] is too short. Well of course it is! I haven’t even started!”

“I found it quite annoying how red crosses came up when you hadn’t finished typing. It’s just really distracting.”

So, the initial recommendation is to use the blur event for validation.

Yet, that brings another problem. If validation only happens on blur, when the status of a field is set as invalid, editing it will continue to show it as invalid - until the user leaves the field. This may lead to users wondering if what they typed is still wrong, unaware that the validation will not happen until they leave the field.

To prevent that problem we will have the following status for each field:

  • Empty. It is the original status of the field. Do not start showing everything as invalid.
  • Validating. The user is typing or editing the field. It is neither valid nor invalid.
  • Valid. The user has put valid input on the field.
  • Invalid. The user has put invalid input on the field.

This leads to the following state diagram:

Validation state diagram

Diagram created with yUML.

Note: for practical purposes Empty and Validating can be considered equivalent. In both states no validation status is shown to the user. Also, it should be possible to return to the Empty state when the user resets the form (if such option is given).

Then we have the following:

Note: an additional thing you may consider is to use a timer to start validation to run once after some interval from the input, change, and keyup events. To correctly do this, this timer would have to be reset each time one of those events run. It is error prone code and for little value.


Where to validate?

HTML5 already adds various means for data form validation. Yet, browser support is not the best. That means that even if we choose to extend HTML5 validation, it may not work depending on the browser.

So, instead we will skip on HTML5 validation, and proceed to add our events:

function setupValidation(form)
{
    addEventHandler(form, 'submit', submitHandler);
    var elementIndex = form.elements.length;
    while (elementIndex--)
    {
        addEventHandler (form.elements[elementIndex], 'reset', resetHandler);
        addEventHandler (form.elements[elementIndex], 'input', validatingHandler);
        addEventHandler (form.elements[elementIndex], 'change', validatingHandler);
        addEventHandler (form.elements[elementIndex], 'keyup', validatingHandler);
        addEventHandler (form.elements[elementIndex], 'blur', validateHandler);
    }
}

Now, given that we are only building form validation, and not a form validation framework or library... we could just get the form element and fields to put whatever validation we want. If we do that, then the form needs not to be a parameter.

To have our code run when the page loads we can take another snippet from You Might Not Need jQuery:

function ready(fn) {
  if (document.readyState != 'loading'){
    fn();
  } else if (document.addEventListener) {
    document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', fn);
  } else {
    document.attachEvent('onreadystatechange', function() {
      if (document.readyState != 'loading')
        fn();
    });
  }
}

Now, we need to be able to store the status of the fields. This can be done by custom properties, attribues or classes to the element object. The use of classes to mark the validation will also help with the presentation of the form.

When validating the form (submitHandler), you will have to decide if you want to rely on the stored field validation or validate again. If you have validation on a field that depends on other fields, you may want to mark that validation as old, that way the form validation code will know to run validation again. Either way, the validation would be done by going over each field.

As per resetHandler and validatingHandler the idea is to remove both valid and invalid status, for the user experience reasons explained earlier.

Done correctly, there should be no situation where a false signal is given to the user. That is, the code should never present the field as invalid when it is valid; neither should present the field as valid when it is invalid.


You may want to disable HTML5 validation. That can be done by adding the novalidate attribute to the form. It can also be done via JavaScript like this:

form.setAttribute('novalidate', 'novalidate');

You may also want to see the property willValidate of the fields.

If you want to laverage HTML5 validation, you can use the function checkValidity.

Futher reading: Client-Side Form Validation with HTML5 and HTML5 Forms: JavaScript and the Constraint Validation API.

Also, the article Constraint Validation: Native Client Side Validation for Web Forms By TJ VanToll has good examples of HTML5 validation.


If we were to build a full form validation library we would go into the trouble of reading the HTML5 validation attributes and mimic their behavior in order to provide it for old browsers. We would also have to worry about how to specify other validation rules that HTML5 doesn’t provide (such as checking if two fields do match) without having to tweak the JavaScript code for each case (because, as I said, that is if we are making a library).


Where to place feedback

The usability suggestion is to inline the feedback. That is to add inline elements next to the field with the feedback as text. You may then use CSS or JavaScript to make it look fancy.

The reason for this suggestion is that people who rely on screen readers will get the feedback in the correct spot. Also, it will continue to make sense even if CSS is disabled or fails to load.

This is pretty much what you are already doing by using the span element. You would need one per field. And perhaps one for the whole form is you want to put some message that is NOT directly associated with any of the fields.


Note: when reading the value of a field, we usually use field.value. The length of the value is field.value.length. Yet it should be noted that depending on the type of input the way to read the value changes. For radio and checkbox use field.checked. For select you need field.options (extra care should be taken for select fields that can have multiple values). Finally image, reset, 'button' and submit don't have a value to be checked.


Too much, too complicated?

You don't have to do it! Other have done it before, and you can take the code from them! Muahahahah!

That would be done by using an open source library such as validate.js or my own thoth.js. Other answers have suggeted other libraries.

You should be able to find more atlernatives. I do not pretend to make an exhaustive list.

It is considered good practice to reuse code. You may also choose to study the code of such libraries to learn how they work.


Old Answer

I'll start by adding comments on your code:

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
    // You start by checking if they match
    if(pass1.value == pass2.value){
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }else{
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }
	// And then that messages gets removed by the result of the length check
    // Also, pass1.length is undefined
    if(pass1.length > 5){
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
    }else{
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
    }
}
         <input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1"/>
         <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
                  <div id="error-nwl"></div>
        

Instead you should pressume that the status is valid until verified otherwise:

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
    message.style.color = goodColor;
    message.innerHTML = "ok!"

    if(pass1.value == pass2.value){
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
    }else{
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }
    if(pass1.value.length > 5){
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
    }else{
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
    }
}
         <input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1"/>
         <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
                  <div id="error-nwl"></div>
        

Beyond that, notice that if you make both fields match and then you edit the first one, the message doesn't go away. In fact, editing the first one will never make the message go away because we are still checking only on the second one. Instead you could check on both.

Also, using keyup maybe annoying and confusing, you may consider using onblur to validate when the user leaves the field (i.e. when the field loses focus, aka blurs).

If you want something fancier you could use the keyup method to erase the message while the user types, or even to check again but on a timer that you reset on each keystroke...

Or you can use HTML5 validation because why not?


I just updated my javascript library thoth to support minlength validation. Also published a helper library to ease form validaton with thoth - it may require some tweaks depending on the case, in particular it doesn't include any mechanism for localization.

Using thoth, you can implement your code as follows. Note: please download the libraries if you want to add them to your code.

Thoth will make sure this validation works in IE8 or newer, and if javascript is not available it will degrade to HTML5 form validation. Remember that the client can always manipulate Javascript and HTML code, so repeat your validations on the server.

.valid
{
    color: #66cc66;
}
.invalid
{
    color: #ff6666;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<head>
	<title>Demo</title>
	<script src="https://rawgit.com/theraot/thoth/master/thoth.js"></script>
	<script src="https://rawgit.com/theraot/thoth/master/form_helper.js"></script>
</head>
<form data-on-valid="document.getElementById('ok').style.display='';" data-on-invalid="document.getElementById('ok').style.display='none';" data-lacking="you have to enter at least 6 digit!" data-lacking-class="invalid">
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password" id="pass1" minlength="6" required="required"/>
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" minlength="6" data-validate="match(@#pass1)" required="required"/>
</form>
<div id="ok" class="valid" style="display:none">ok!</div>

There are quite a few of data- attributes here, I'll break it down for you:

  • data-on-valid: the code that will run when the form validates correctly.
  • data-on-invalid: the code that will run when the form doesn't validates.
  • data-lacking: the string format to use when there are not enough characters. Similarly data-remaining and data-excess will work when there is room before reaching maxlength and when the text exceds maxlength respectively.
  • data-lacking-class: the the css class to use for the lacking message, similary data-remaining-class and data-excess-class exist.

The above are added by the helper library form_helper.cs. From the library thoth only the following is used:

  • data-validate: additional validations. In this case it is used to add the validation to varify that both fields match.

Sorry for the lack of documentation.

Note: data-on-valid and data-on-invalid are not proper events.

  • thank u . but there is a problem. both fields are correct the lenght and the macth..and now i've changed the text of first filed . the error still is ok! – inaz Sep 28 '16 at 8:22
  • @inaz because you are only checking on the second field - I was trying to warn you about this. – Theraot Sep 28 '16 at 8:24
  • how can i change my code to validate both field? i want to check both of fileds – inaz Sep 28 '16 at 8:31
  • @inaz you only checkPass onkeyup of the second field, so it only runs when the user edits the second field. You would have to do something similar on the first field. – Theraot Sep 28 '16 at 8:37
  • @inaz I have extended the answer with a solution with a library of mine. If I want javascript form validation done correctly, this is what I use. – Theraot Sep 28 '16 at 10:50
3

If you're using jQuery you can use this jQuery Validation plugin

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Makes "field" required to be the same as #other</title>
        <link rel="stylesheet" href="https://jqueryvalidation.org/files/demo/site-demos.css">
    </head>
    <body>
        <form id="myform">
            <label for="password">Password</label>
            <input id="password" name="password" />
            <br/>
            <input type="submit" value="Validate!">
        </form>
        <script src="https://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.1.min.js"></script>
        <script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/jquery.validation/1.15.0/jquery.validate.min.js"></script>
        <script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/jquery.validation/1.15.0/additional-methods.min.js"></script>
        <script>
            // just for the demos, avoids form submit
            jQuery.validator.setDefaults({
                debug: true,
                success: "valid"
            });
            $( "#myform" ).validate({
                rules: {
                    password: {
                        minlength: 6,
                        maxlength: 25, 
                        required: true
                    }
                }
            });
        </script>
    </body>
</html>

3

function checkPassSize(field) {
	var pass = document.getElementById(field);
	var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
	var goodColor = "#66cc66";
	var badColor = "#ff6666";		
	if (pass.value && pass.value.length > 5) {
		pass.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
		message.style.color = goodColor;
		message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
		return true;
	} else {
		pass.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
		message.style.color = badColor;
		message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
		return false;
	}
}

function checkPass() {
	var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
	var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
	var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
	var goodColor = "#66cc66";
	var badColor = "#ff6666";
	
	if(checkPassSize('pass1') && checkPassSize('pass2')){
		if (pass1.value == pass2.value) {
			pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
			message.style.color = goodColor;
			message.innerHTML = "ok!"
		} else {
			pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
			message.style.color = badColor;
			message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
		}
	}								
}
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"
	id="pass1" onkeyup="checkPassSize('pass1');" />
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password"
	placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2"
	onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
<div id="error-nwl"></div>

2

Here is with working code.. Change pass1.length to pass1.value.length and update colors of both text fields based on validations.

<html>

<head>
    <script>
    function checkPass() {
        var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
        var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
        var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
        var goodColor = "#66cc66";
        var badColor = "#ff6666";
        if (pass1.value == pass2.value) {
            pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
            pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
            message.style.color = goodColor;
            message.innerHTML = "ok!"
        } else {
            pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
            message.style.color = badColor;
            message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
        }

        if (pass1.value.length > 5 && pass1.value == pass2.value) {
            pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
            pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
            message.style.color = goodColor;
            message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
        } else {
            pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
            message.style.color = badColor;
            message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
        }

    }
    </script>

</head>

<body>
  <input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password" onkeyup="checkPass();" id="pass1" />
  <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass();  return false;" />
  <div id="error-nwl"></div>
</body>
</html>

2

This code validate both fields while typing.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<body>

    <input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password" id="pass1" onkeyup="setStyle(this,document.getElementById('pass2'));" />
    <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="setStyle(this,document.getElementById('pass1'));" />
    <div id="error-nwl"></div>


    <script>
      function isValidLength(element) {
          return (element.value.length > 5);
      }

      function isEqual(element1, element2) {
          if (element1.value.length > 0 && element2.value.length > 0)
              return (element1.value == element2.value);
          return true;
      }

      function setStyle(element, element2) {
          var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
          var goodColor = "#66cc66";
          var badColor = "#ff6666";
          var isValidPWD = isValidLength(element) && isEqual(element, element2);

          if (isValidPWD) {
              if (isValidLength(element)) {
                  element.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
                  message.style.color = goodColor;
                  message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
              }
              if (isEqual(element, element2)) {
                  element.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
                  message.style.color = goodColor;
                  message.innerHTML = "ok!"
              }
          } else {
              if (!isValidLength(element)) {
                  element.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
                  message.style.color = badColor;
                  message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
              }

              if (!isEqual(element, element2)) {
                  element.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
                  message.style.color = badColor;
                  message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
              }
          }
      }
  </script>


</body>

</html>

0

You could move the second if else block into the first if and obtain what you might have wanted. You also need to change pass1.length to pass1.value.length.

I also think that you should check changes on both input boxes. If you don't do that the user can switch back to the first input box and change the password afterwards and the check states won't update.

Here is the updated code.

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
	
    if(pass1.value.length > 5){
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        //message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"
        if(pass1.value == pass2.value) {
            pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
            message.style.color = goodColor;
            message.innerHTML = "Ok!"
        }
    	else{
            pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
            message.style.color = badColor;
            message.innerHTML = "These passwords don't match!"
        }
    }
    else{
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = "You have to enter at least 6 digits!"
    }
}  
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;"/>
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass(); return false;" />
<div id="error-nwl"></div>
        

0

you can use validform.js.

For example:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://validform.rjboy.cn/wp-content/themes/validform/js/jquery-1.6.2.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://validform.rjboy.cn/Validform/v5.1/Validform_v5.1_min.js"></script>
<script>
$(".demoform").Validform();

</script>
<form class="demoform">
<input type="password" value="" name="userpassword" datatype="*6-15" errormsg="Password range between 6~15 bits!" />
<input type="password" value="" name="userpassword2" datatype="*" recheck="userpassword" errormsg="The account passwords you entered for the two time were not consistent." /></form>

0

Try this out!

function resetcol() 
{
    pass1.style = "";
    pass2.style = "";

}

function checkPass()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
    if (pass1.value == pass2.value && pass1.value.length > 5){
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }
	else{
        pass1.style = 
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = "Bad input. your passwords must match, and be at least 6 characters long."
    }
	    	
}  
         <input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1" onkeyup="resetcol();"/>
         <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="resetcol();" onchange="checkPass(); return false;" />
                  <div id="error-nwl"></div>
        
PS. you have to click out of the pass2 field because of the onchange event! UPVOTE if it works!

0

It's better to assign event listener to elements in code after DOM load, so you can omit multiple calls to getElementById, but anyway this is your code corrected:

var goodColor = "#66cc66", badColor = "#ff6666";

function checkPass() {
  
  message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
  pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
  pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');

  if (pass1.value.length > 5) {
    pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
    message.style.color = goodColor;
    message.innerHTML = "character number ok!"

    if (pass2.value == pass1.value) {
      pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
      message.style.color = goodColor;
      message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }
    else {
      pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
      message.style.color = badColor;
      message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }

  }
  else {
    pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
    message.style.color = badColor;
    message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
  }

}  
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password" id="pass1" onkeyup="checkPass()" />
<input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass()" />
<div id="error-nwl"></div>

0

You have to keep in mind that there are many possibilities of event and the order of event.

if(user>0 and user<5){//output username should be 6}
if(pass>0 and pass<5){//output password should be 6}
if(user>5 and pass>5){
    if(user==pass){//password match}
    else{//invalid password}
}

I have modified the your code to have work around

function checkPass() {
  var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
  var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
  var message = document.getElementById('error-nwl');
  var goodColor = "#66cc66";
  var badColor = "#ff6666";

  if (pass1.value.length > 5) {

    pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
    message.style.color = goodColor;
    if (pass1.value == pass2.value) {
      pass1.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
      pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
      message.style.color = goodColor;
      message.innerHTML = "ok!";
    } else {
      if (pass2.value.length > 0) {
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match";
      }
    }
  } else {
    if (pass1.value.length <= 5 && pass1.value.length > 0) {
      pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
      message.style.color = badColor;
      message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit user!";
      if (pass2.value.length > 0) {
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
      }
    }
    if (pass2.value.length <= 5 && pass2.value.length > 0) {
      pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
      message.style.color = badColor;
      message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit pass!"
    }
  }

}
<html>

<body>
  <input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password" onkeyup="checkPass();" id="pass1" />
  <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass();" />
  <div id="error-nwl"></div>
</body>

</html>

This can alternatively be done by calling onkeyup method in both fields and writing different function to validate fields, this will ensure more flexibility and will work around most of cases. You may also be interested in adding other events like onBlur to test when user takes focus is shifted.

Hope this answer your question

0

you can use two functions to do this job.

checkPass1() checks weather the password is long enough. checkPass2() checks weather these passwords match. In case of some user may first fill the #pass2, I add checkPass2() into checkPass1().

function checkPass1() 
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var message = document.getElementById('length-error');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
    var normalColor = "#ffffff"
    if (pass1.value.length <= 5)
    {
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " you have to enter at least 6 digit!"
    }
    else
    {
        pass1.style.backgroundColor = normalColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = " the length of password is long enough";
    }
    checkPass2();
}
function checkPass2()
{
    var pass1 = document.getElementById('pass1');
    var pass2 = document.getElementById('pass2');
    var message = document.getElementById('confirm-error');
    var goodColor = "#66cc66";
    var badColor = "#ff6666";
    if(pass1.value == pass2.value)
    {
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = goodColor;
        message.style.color = goodColor;
        message.innerHTML = "ok!"
    }
    else
    {
        pass2.style.backgroundColor = badColor;
        message.style.color = badColor;
        message.innerHTML = " These passwords don't match"
    }
}
<input name="password" type="password" placeholder="password"  id="pass1" onkeyup="checkPass1()"/>
    <input name="repeatpassword" type="password" placeholder="confirm password" id="pass2" onkeyup="checkPass2()" />
    <div id="length-error"></div>
    <div id="confirm-error"></div>

  • Explaining your code and giving more detail would probably be helpful. – Charlie Fish Oct 8 '16 at 5:12

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