61

So I have looked at various tutorials about JPA with Spring Data and this has been done different on many occasions and I am no quite sure what the correct approach is.

Assume there is the follwing entity:

package stackoverflowTest.dao;

import javax.persistence.*;

@Entity
@Table(name = "customers")
public class Customer {

@Id
@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
@Column(name = "id")
private long id;

@Column(name = "name")
private String name;

public Customer(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public Customer() {
}

public long getId() {
    return id;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}
}

We also have a DTO which is retrieved in the service layer and then handed to the controller/client side.

package stackoverflowTest.dto;

public class CustomerDto {

private long id;
private String name;

public CustomerDto(long id, String name) {
    this.id = id;
    this.name = name;
}

public long getId() {
    return id;
}

public void setId(long id) {
    this.id = id;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}
}

So now assume the Customer wants to change his name in the webui - then there will be some controller action, where there will be the updated DTO with the old ID and the new name.

Now I have to save this updated DTO to the database.

Unluckily currently there is no way to update an existing customer (except than deleting the entry in the DB and creating a new Cusomter with a new auto-generated id)

However as this is not feasible (especially considering such an entity could have hundreds of relations potentially) - so there come 2 straight forward solutions to my mind:

  1. make a setter for the id in the Customer class - and thus allow setting of the id and then save the Customer object via the corresponding repository.

or

  1. add the id field to the constructor and whenever you want to update a customer you always create a new object with the old id, but the new values for the other fields (in this case only the name)

So my question is wether there is a general rule how to do this? Any maybe what the drawbacks of the 2 methods I explained are?

5
  • 6
    "So currently there is no way to update an existing customer (except than deleting the entry in the DB and createing a new Cusomter with a new auto-generated id)" Say... what?. How did you get to this idea? Sep 28, 2016 at 7:49
  • if you are calling save() with the same ID and you havent overridden it, it will give you a Duplicate ID exception. If you have configured Spring Transactions properly , then whenever you have fetched a customer from the DB and simply setting the values you want, you could see that some queries will be written out in the logs. But still lets consider it without JPA , in your scenarios generally how you could update a customer row with simple sql ???? if you dont have the ID????
    – AntJavaDev
    Sep 28, 2016 at 7:55
  • I will add some clarfications in a moment, thanks for your comments Sep 28, 2016 at 7:57
  • I updated the question to make it somewhat clearer Sep 28, 2016 at 8:04
  • You can remove strategy = GenerationType.AUTOas it is by default. The same for @Column(name = "id") as it is exactly the same as id attribute.
    – belgoros
    Aug 17, 2020 at 14:14

8 Answers 8

122

Even better then @Tanjim Rahman answer you can using Spring Data JPA use the method T getOne(ID id)

Customer customerToUpdate = customerRepository.getOne(id);
customerToUpdate.setName(customerDto.getName);
customerRepository.save(customerToUpdate);

Is's better because getOne(ID id) gets you only a reference (proxy) object and does not fetch it from the DB. On this reference you can set what you want and on save() it will do just an SQL UPDATE statement like you expect it. In comparsion when you call find() like in @Tanjim Rahmans answer spring data JPA will do an SQL SELECT to physically fetch the entity from the DB, which you dont need, when you are just updating.

7
  • 2
    Robert Niestroj and Lukas Makor, I have checked your answer. It will definitely works fine than find for performance because no read from DB. But also it has a security concern. What if you don't want to update a column of Customer table. Imagine you want to update customer name but you don't wanna update customer creation date(As it will do only by insert and never update). In these cases it would be better to fetch DB current row before update. Also if you want to use JPA version for optimistic locking, you may face problem.
    – Esty
    Oct 2, 2016 at 6:27
  • 3
    This will issue an update statements against all fields update tbl set f1=v1, f2=v2, etc... where id=? dba.stackexchange.com/q/176582/148282 Apr 3, 2018 at 11:00
  • 3
    Throws LazyInitializationException in my test case.
    – PeMa
    Nov 14, 2018 at 14:02
  • 5
    This isn't correct. The reference is used for lazy loading (or if reference is linked to an entity, it doesn't need to be loaded at all). It has nothing to do with lazily updating values. Unless someone can show a JPA implementation that works like this, there's no evidence of this happening, and it's not according to JPA spec (although I guess it doesn't expressly forbid it either).
    – Kayaman
    Mar 10, 2021 at 18:48
  • 3
    GetOne is now deprecated
    – anegru
    Jul 28, 2021 at 11:29
12

In Spring Data you simply define an update query if you have the ID

  @Repository
  public interface CustomerRepository extends JpaRepository<Customer , Long> {

     @Query("update Customer c set c.name = :name WHERE c.id = :customerId")
     void setCustomerName(@Param("customerId") Long id, @Param("name") String name);

  }

Some solutions claim to use Spring data and do JPA oldschool (even in a manner with lost updates) instead.

8
  • I have an issue with this solution, if I query the object again after this update I get it from Hiberate Session Cache. even with the @Modifying annotation
    – TecHunter
    Apr 1, 2019 at 14:44
  • Does your calling service carry the @Transactional Annotation?
    – gorefest
    Apr 3, 2019 at 5:44
  • yes :/ in the end, I saw that commit is done properly but Hibernate has a session cache which is refreshed when saving/deleting. But here it doesn't get refreshed and I can clearly see with the debug logs the get entity from session cache
    – TecHunter
    Apr 3, 2019 at 20:25
  • The first level cache is flushed on commit and all modifications are applied on the database - within the container transaction -, if an entity is queried, whose modifications have not been synced with the db yet. Are you aware of this? Can be a solid source of side effects.
    – gorefest
    Apr 5, 2019 at 5:58
  • 1
    Maybe you have hit a fringe situation. Normally hibernate detects this "under the hood", since Hibernate will keep track over all entities in the first level cache. If you are going update an entity, it won't be flushed until a) the transaction is over or b) the entity is queried. Are you able to isolate this behaviour in a test? Then you could hand it over to the Spring Data community and ask for assistance. Oh, and does you Application carry the @EnableJpaRepositories annotation?
    – gorefest
    Apr 12, 2019 at 6:50
1

This is more an object initialzation question more than a jpa question, both methods work and you can have both of them at the same time , usually if the data member value is ready before the instantiation you use the constructor parameters, if this value could be updated after the instantiation you should have a setter.

4
  • you are right, however I was wondering if there are some special best practices when working with JPA Sep 28, 2016 at 8:01
  • Hibernate is a collection of API which enables you to work with java models instead of sql, you need to have your models ready so you can use these API's Sep 28, 2016 at 8:05
  • Yes i know this, but I was wondering wether there are some downsides to one or another approach, or maybe even some hidden pitfalls. Sep 28, 2016 at 8:08
  • Mainly the difference between using setters or constructors as i mentioned , yet you can search for more details answers regarding this Sep 28, 2016 at 8:14
1

If you need to work with DTOs rather than entities directly then you should retrieve the existing Customer instance and map the updated fields from the DTO to that.

Customer entity = //load from DB
//map fields from DTO to entity
3
  • so you suggest loading the entity from the DB and then updating the fields via setters? Sep 28, 2016 at 8:09
  • just one more question: so you would say that the overhead of doing another query against the DB is negligible in general? Sep 28, 2016 at 8:12
  • yes, this is how JPA/Hibernate works.. You inevitably load the whole entity before updates, regardless getOne() or findById(). This is by design to ensure that L2C is updated properly. Surely, if you do not use cache, updating with a native query or Spring Data @Modifying is the way to go, but add you some extra job. Jul 26, 2019 at 6:33
1

Simple JPA update..

Customer customer = em.find(id, Customer.class); //Consider em as JPA EntityManager
customer.setName(customerDto.getName);
em.merge(customer);
3
  • 1
    em.getReference would perform better, since it only fetches the id Nov 22, 2017 at 12:40
  • 3
    The question is about Spring Data. Your answer doesn't really help.
    – ichalos
    Mar 1, 2019 at 11:09
  • @Journeycorner Would this delete the existing db records which are not available in customer object? I'm failing to achieve this. May 5, 2021 at 5:25
1

So now assume the Customer wants to change his name in the webui - then there will be some controller action, where there will be the updated DTO with the old ID and the new name.

Normally, you have the following workflow:

  1. User requests his data from server and obtains them in UI;
  2. User corrects his data and sends it back to server with already present ID;
  3. On server you obtain DTO with updated data by user, find it in DB by ID (otherwise throw exception) and transform DTO -> Entity with all given data, foreign keys, etc...
  4. Then you just merge it, or if using Spring Data invoke save(), which in turn will merge it (see this thread);

P.S. This operation will inevitably issue 2 queries: select and update. Again, 2 queries, even if you wanna update a single field. However, if you utilize Hibernate's proprietary @DynamicUpdate annotation on top of entity class, it will help you not to include into update statement all the fields, but only those that actually changed.

P.S. If you do not wanna pay for first select statement and prefer to use Spring Data's @Modifying query, be prepared to lose L2C cache region related to modifiable entity; even worse situation with native update queries (see this thread) and also of course be prepared to write those queries manually, test them and support them in the future.

2
  • When you say "transform DTO -> Entity with all given data, foreign keys, etc...". Are you updating the entity you fetched?
    – Toast
    Apr 1, 2020 at 20:26
  • At step 3, yes you can update (within an active transaction of course) the entity you fetched by ID, another option is not to fetch manually, but create a new entity with new operator and set all the fields from DTO (including ID) and then merge it as step 4 describes; Apr 2, 2020 at 5:04
1

I have encountered this issue!
Luckily, I determine 2 ways and understand some things but the rest is not clear.
Hope someone discuss or support if you know.

  1. Use RepositoryExtendJPA.save(entity).
    Example:
    List<Person> person = this.PersonRepository.findById(0) person.setName("Neo"); This.PersonReository.save(person);
    this block code updated new name for record which has id = 0;
  2. Use @Transactional from javax or spring framework.
    Let put @Transactional upon your class or specified function, both are ok.
    I read at somewhere that this annotation do a "commit" action at the end your function flow. So, every things you modified at entity would be updated to database.
2
  • 1
    you can't call setName on a person object if the person is a List<Person> ... Jul 22, 2020 at 4:51
  • yes, this's mistake. Let's get per = person.get(0) << if person.length !== 0>> after that use setName for per. Best regard
    – Neo_
    Jul 22, 2020 at 7:29
0

There is a method in JpaRepository

getOne

It is deprecated at the moment in favor of

getById

So correct approach would be

Customer customerToUpdate = customerRepository.getById(id);
customerToUpdate.setName(customerDto.getName);
customerRepository.save(customerToUpdate);

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