8

I'd like Django to serve some media files (e.g. user-uploaded files) only for logged-in users. Since my site is quite low-traffic, I think I will keep things simple and do not use django-sendfile to tell Nginx when to serve a file. Instead I'll let Django/Gunicorn do the job. To me this seems a lot simpler and for a low traffic site this maybe more secure.

But what is the best way to organize the file storage location? Media files are all stored below MEDIA_ROOT and this directory is served by Nginx in production. If I upload my files to MEDIA_ROOT/protected/ I have to tell Nginx not to serve the files in the subdirectory protected.

But is this a good idea? It seems a litte risky to me to allow Nginx access /media/ in the first place and then protect the subdirectory /media/protected/. Wouldn't it be better not to use a subdirectory of MEDIA_ROOT to store protected files?

But if I try something like this quick-and-dirty in my model:

upload_to='../protected/documents/%Y/%m/'

Django complains:

SuspiciousFileOperation at /admin/core/document/add/
The joined path (/home/me/projects/project/protected/documents/2016/09/test.file) is located outside of the base path component (/home/me/projects/project/media)

So I thing it is not good practice to "leave" the MEDIA_ROOT.

What is the best solution to store and serve protected media files?

1
10

I now came up with the following solution:

I have this in my Django settings:

MEDIA_ROOT = "/projects/project/media/"
MEDIA_URL = "/media/

In my models I do either:

document = models.FileField(upload_to="public/documents")

or

document = models.FileField(upload_to="protected/documents")

This way, I now have the two subdirectories 'public' and 'protected' in my media files directory.

Nginx or Djangos development server only serves the files in the 'public' subdirectory.

For Djangos development server:

if os.environ["ENVIRONMENT_TYPE"] == 'development':
    urlpatterns += static(settings.MEDIA_URL + "public/", document_root=settings.MEDIA_ROOT + "public/")

And for Nginx (used in production):

location /media/public/ {
    alias   /projects/project/media/public/;
}

When I want to serve a protected document, I do the following:

In urls.py:

url(r'^media/protected/documents/(?P<file>.*)$', core.views.serve_protected_document, name='serve_protected_document'),

And in views.py:

@login_required()
def serve_protected_document(request, file):
    document = get_object_or_404(ProtectedDocument, file="protected/documents/" + file)

    # Split the elements of the path
    path, file_name = os.path.split(file)

    response = FileResponse(document.file,)
    response["Content-Disposition"] = "attachment; filename=" + file_name

    return response

I would appreciate any comments! Are there better ways to implement this?

3
  • I am looking for a solution to the same problem, except that I don't have any public media and that I wouldn't like misusing Django to serve files. But for the moment just one remark. Shouldn't file be opened before using File response? docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.10/ref/request-response/…
    – texnic
    Jan 15 '17 at 0:26
  • @texnic check my answer Apr 5 '17 at 6:33
  • 5
    Your views.py is not safe. If someone copy/pastes the url from source html, anyone should be able to download the file as long as they are logged in as anyone who has an account. Oct 30 '19 at 22:30
10

Serving media files ( that may be large files) from view directly is not good. You can use sendfile extension available in nginx server; a sample nginx configuration is like below.

 location /projects/project/media/{
    # this path is not public
    internal;
    # absolute path
    alias /projects/project/media/;
 }

change your view to

@login_required
def serve_protected_document(request, file):
    document = get_object_or_404(ProtectedDocument, file="protected/documents/" + file)

    # Split the elements of the path
    path, file_name = os.path.split(file)

    response = HttpResponse()
    response["Content-Disposition"] = "attachment; filename=" + file_name
    # nginx uses this path to serve the file
    response["X-Accel-Redirect"] = document.name # path to file
    return response

Link: More details on configuring sendfile extension on nginx is here

3
  • This isn't answering the question. It is about how you show the link on the form edit page.
    – stephen
    Mar 22 '18 at 13:29
  • 1
    The OP specified that the use case did not demand performance, and instead was looking for a simple implementation using the auth functions already in Django.
    – shanemgrey
    May 1 '18 at 21:46
  • @surfer190 Spend some time on how a webserver handle requests compared to a WSGI application, then you will get an idea! Nov 8 '19 at 8:18

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