304

In MongoDB, is it possible to update the value of a field using the value from another field? The equivalent SQL would be something like:

UPDATE Person SET Name = FirstName + ' ' + LastName

And the MongoDB pseudo-code would be:

db.person.update( {}, { $set : { name : firstName + ' ' + lastName } );
157

The best way to do this is in version 4.2+ which allows using of aggregation pipeline in the update document and the updateOne, updateMany or update collection method. Note that the latter has been deprecated in most if not all languages drivers.

MongoDB 4.2+

Version 4.2 also introduced the $set pipeline stage operator which is an alias for $addFields. I will use $set here as it maps with what we are trying to achieve.

db.collection.<update method>(
    {},
    [
        {"$set": {"name": { "$concat": ["$firstName", " ", "$lastName"]}}}
    ]
)

MongoDB 3.4+

In 3.4+ you can use $addFields and the $out aggregation pipeline operators.

db.collection.aggregate(
    [
        { "$addFields": { 
            "name": { "$concat": [ "$firstName", " ", "$lastName" ] } 
        }},
        { "$out": "collection" }
    ]
)

Note that this does not update your collection but instead replace the existing collection or create a new one. Also for update operations that require "type casting" you will need client side processing, and depending on the operation, you may need to use the find() method instead of the .aggreate() method.

MongoDB 3.2 and 3.0

The way we do this is by $projecting our documents and use the $concat string aggregation operator to return the concatenated string. we From there, you then iterate the cursor and use the $set update operator to add the new field to your documents using bulk operations for maximum efficiency.

Aggregation query:

var cursor = db.collection.aggregate([ 
    { "$project":  { 
        "name": { "$concat": [ "$firstName", " ", "$lastName" ] } 
    }}
])

MongoDB 3.2 or newer

from this, you need to use the bulkWrite method.

var requests = [];
cursor.forEach(document => { 
    requests.push( { 
        'updateOne': {
            'filter': { '_id': document._id },
            'update': { '$set': { 'name': document.name } }
        }
    });
    if (requests.length === 500) {
        //Execute per 500 operations and re-init
        db.collection.bulkWrite(requests);
        requests = [];
    }
});

if(requests.length > 0) {
     db.collection.bulkWrite(requests);
}

MongoDB 2.6 and 3.0

From this version you need to use the now deprecated Bulk API and its associated methods.

var bulk = db.collection.initializeUnorderedBulkOp();
var count = 0;

cursor.snapshot().forEach(function(document) { 
    bulk.find({ '_id': document._id }).updateOne( {
        '$set': { 'name': document.name }
    });
    count++;
    if(count%500 === 0) {
        // Excecute per 500 operations and re-init
        bulk.execute();
        bulk = db.collection.initializeUnorderedBulkOp();
    }
})

// clean up queues
if(count > 0) {
    bulk.execute();
}

MongoDB 2.4

cursor["result"].forEach(function(document) {
    db.collection.update(
        { "_id": document._id }, 
        { "$set": { "name": document.name } }
    );
})
  • Great answer. Just wondering, is calling .length every iteration in mongo is as slow as regular javascript, where it recalculates the length on every call? – notbad.jpeg Sep 15 '16 at 16:58
  • 2
    @notbad.jpeg I can say whether it is slow or not but the length property is check at each iteration. This is something I will need to check later. Another option if that is slow is to use a counter which you then increment by 1 at each iteration. – styvane Sep 15 '16 at 19:40
  • 8
    The answer does well to summarize approaches and I know it's formed addressing the specific update request mentioned in the question, however one small niggle is too many people are jumping to the aggregation method. This really needs a BOLD disclaimer that this in fact 1. Creates a new collection rather than updating the existing one. 2. Needs to be avoided when "casting types". I.E The common mistake of storing "strings" instead of Date and needing to convert. I for one would be very happy if this was prominent, and not just a little comment tacked on the end. – Neil Lunn Jun 17 '17 at 9:39
  • It seems that the aggregate() approach is not fully equivalent to what update() does, because the records that do not get touched by the filter/$match would be missing in the target collection and disappear from the original if it is specified as target. – Sergey Shcherbakov Mar 20 '18 at 10:15
  • 4
    So, still we cannot refer to a document by itself in MongoDB? I don't want to create a new collection just to add one column! – Homam Aug 29 '18 at 5:27
232

You should iterate through. For your specific case:

db.person.find().snapshot().forEach(
    function (elem) {
        db.person.update(
            {
                _id: elem._id
            },
            {
                $set: {
                    name: elem.firstname + ' ' + elem.lastname
                }
            }
        );
    }
);
  • 4
    What happens if another user has changed the document between your find() and your save()? – UpTheCreek Feb 15 '13 at 11:33
  • 3
    True, but copying between fields should not require transactions to be atomic. – UpTheCreek Feb 19 '13 at 9:25
  • 3
    It's important to notice that save() fully replaces the document. Should use update() instead. – EdMelo Mar 22 '13 at 21:44
  • 12
    How about db.person.update( { _id: elem._id }, { $set: { name: elem.firstname + ' ' + elem.lastname } } ); – Philipp Jardas Aug 19 '13 at 13:34
  • 1
    +1. Wrong format for update, doesn't work as currently formulated. – Viktor Hedefalk Sep 5 '13 at 9:46
103

Apparently there is a way to do this efficiently since MongoDB 3.4, see styvane's answer.


Obsolete answer below

You cannot refer to the document itself in an update (yet). You'll need to iterate through the documents and update each document using a function. See this answer for an example, or this one for server-side eval().

  • 31
    Is this still valid today? – Christian Engel Jan 12 '13 at 22:08
  • 3
    @ChristianEngel: It appears so. I wasn't able to find anything in the MongoDB docs that mentions a reference to the current document in an update operation. This related feature request is still unresolved as well. – Niels van der Rest Jan 14 '13 at 12:28
  • 4
    Is it still valid in April 2017? Or there are already new features which can do this? – Kim Apr 26 '17 at 12:01
  • 1
    @Kim It looks like it is still valid. Also, the feature request that @niels-van-der-rest pointed out back in 2013 is still in OPEN. – Danziger May 3 '17 at 22:30
  • 8
    this is not a valid answer anymore, have a look at @styvane answer – aitchkhan Mar 11 '18 at 18:28
41

For a database with high activity, you may run into issues where your updates affect actively changing records and for this reason I recommend using snapshot()

db.person.find().snapshot().forEach( function (hombre) {
    hombre.name = hombre.firstName + ' ' + hombre.lastName; 
    db.person.save(hombre); 
});

http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/method/cursor.snapshot/

  • 2
    What happens if another user edited the person between the find() and save()? I have a case where multiple calls can be done to the same object changing them based on their current values. The 2nd user should have to wait with reading until the 1st is done with saving. Does this accomplish that? – Marco Oct 11 '17 at 12:48
  • 4
    About the snapshot(): Deprecated in the mongo Shell since v3.2. Starting in v3.2, the $snapshot operator is deprecated in the mongo shell. In the mongo shell, use cursor.snapshot() instead. link – ppython Dec 20 '17 at 14:52
9

I tried the above solution but I found it unsuitable for large amounts of data. I then discovered the stream feature:

MongoClient.connect("...", function(err, db){
    var c = db.collection('yourCollection');
    var s = c.find({/* your query */}).stream();
    s.on('data', function(doc){
        c.update({_id: doc._id}, {$set: {name : doc.firstName + ' ' + doc.lastName}}, function(err, result) { /* result == true? */} }
    });
    s.on('end', function(){
        // stream can end before all your updates do if you have a lot
    })
})
  • 1
    How is this different? Will the steam be throttled by the update activity? Do you have any reference to it? The Mongo docs are quite poor. – Nico Nov 21 '16 at 14:58
3

Regarding this answer, the snapshot function is deprecated in version 3.6, according to this update. So, on version 3.6 and above, it is possible to perform the operation this way:

db.person.find().forEach(
    function (elem) {
        db.person.update(
            {
                _id: elem._id
            },
            {
                $set: {
                    name: elem.firstname + ' ' + elem.lastname
                }
            }
        );
    }
);
2

Here's what we came up with for copying one field to another for ~150_000 records. It took about 6 minutes, but is still significantly less resource intensive than it would have been to instantiate and iterate over the same number of ruby objects.

js_query = %({
  $or : [
    {
      'settings.mobile_notifications' : { $exists : false },
      'settings.mobile_admin_notifications' : { $exists : false }
    }
  ]
})

js_for_each = %(function(user) {
  if (!user.settings.hasOwnProperty('mobile_notifications')) {
    user.settings.mobile_notifications = user.settings.email_notifications;
  }
  if (!user.settings.hasOwnProperty('mobile_admin_notifications')) {
    user.settings.mobile_admin_notifications = user.settings.email_admin_notifications;
  }
  db.users.save(user);
})

js = "db.users.find(#{js_query}).forEach(#{js_for_each});"
Mongoid::Sessions.default.command('$eval' => js)
0

Starting Mongo 4.2, db.collection.update() can accept an aggregation pipeline, finally allowing the update/creation of a field based on another field:

// { firstName: "Hello", lastName: "World" }
db.collection.update(
  {},
  [{ $set: { name: { $concat: [ "$firstName", " ", "$lastName" ] } } }],
  { multi: true }
)
// { "firstName" : "Hello", "lastName" : "World", "name" : "Hello World" }
  • The first part {} is the match query, filtering which documents to update (in our case all documents).

  • The second part [{ $set: { name: { ... } }] is the update aggregation pipeline (note the squared brackets signifying the use of an aggregation pipeline). $set is a new aggregation operator and an alias of $addFields.

  • Don't forget { multi: true }, otherwise only the first matching document will be updated.

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