33

Both promises and AJAX calls are asynchronous operations. A GET/POST request could be made with both. << Edit: that's a WRONG statement

So what's the difference between them? And when would be best to use one instead of the other?

Also, one more thing:

Recently I encountered a promise which had an AJAX in its body. Why put an async operation inside an async operation? That's like putting a bread loaf in a bread sandwich.

function threadsGet() {
return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  $.getJSON('api/threads')
    .done(resolve)
    .fail(reject);
    })
}

jQuery is used here. And the AJAX call has Promise behavior and properties. I didn't get that earlier but here are my thoughts: We can do something in the Promise. Then use the AJAX call and in the done function pass the resolved Promise logic. Specifically in this example there is none.

Now I see that I had confused both. They're pretty much 2 different things. Just because they're asynchronous, doesn't mean they're interchangeable.

==============

EDIT 2: Just some materials I found useful:

Promise Anti-Patterns

6
  • Can you please clarify what you mean when you say you can make GET/POST requests with a promise ? Sep 28 '16 at 15:14
  • 3
    A promise, by itself, has no mechanism for making GET/POST requests. Perhaps read up on the Promises documentation? Sep 28 '16 at 15:22
  • 2
    A Promise is an interface for asynchronous operations. An ajax request is a very specific asynchronous operation.
    – Bergi
    Sep 28 '16 at 15:27
  • Why wouldn't you just use setTimeout instead of an ajax call? That's also just an asynchronous operation.
    – Bergi
    Sep 28 '16 at 15:28
  • 1
    @Bergi, thanks for the comment. It just struck me. Promise is mainly for removing the callback hell. It can be used with AJAX and other stuff. But in the end, the main idea is to chain async operations in a more easy to manage and read manner. Man! I read this so many times but I only realized this just now...
    – Bruno
    Sep 28 '16 at 16:06
90

You are confused about promises and Ajax calls. They are kind of like apples and knives. You can cut an apple with knife and the knife is a tool that can be applied to an apple, but the two are very different things.

Promises are a tool for managing asynchronous operations. They keep track of when asynchronous operations complete and what their results are and let you coordinate that completion and those results (including error conditions) with other code or other asynchronous operations. They aren't actually asynchronous operations in themselves. An Ajax call is a specific asynchronous operation that can be used with with a traditional callback interface or wrapped in a promise interface.

So what's the difference between them? And when would be best to use one instead of the other?

An Ajax call is a specific type of asynchronous operation. You can make an Ajax call either with a traditional callback using the XMLHttpRequest interface or you can make an Ajax call (in modern browsers), using a promise with the fetch() interface.

Recently I encountered a promise which had an AJAX in its body. Why put an async operation inside an async operation? That's like putting a bread loaf in a bread sandwich.

You didn't show the specific code you were talking about, but sometimes you want to start async operation 1 and then when that async operation is done, you want to them start async operation 2 (often using the results of the first one). In that case, you will typically nest one inside the other.


Your code example here:

function threadsGet() {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      $.getJSON('api/threads')
        .done(resolve)
        .fail(reject);
      })
}

is considered a promise anti-pattern. There's no reason to create a new promise here because $.getJSON() already returns a promise which you can return. You can just do this instead:

function threadsGet() {
    return $.getJSON('api/threads');
}

Or, if you want to "cast" the somewhat non-standard jQuery promise to a standard promise, you can do this:

function threadsGet() {
    return Promise.resolve($.getJSON('api/threads'));
}
2
  • Thanks! A updated my question with an example of an AJAX in a Promise. And I already got the idea of it. :)
    – Bruno
    Sep 30 '16 at 20:33
  • Thanks a lot for the update! I didn't even know there are good/bad practices with promises. I like your optimized code. It's MUCH more understandable and elegant. The thing that puzzled me a lot in the code I posted was - Ajax resolving the success of the outer promise and (eventually) failing its error. But it's clear now. :)
    – Bruno
    Oct 1 '16 at 15:56

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