I've been trying to figure out exactly what message-oriented middleware is, but haven't been able to find any non-enterprise real world examples that make sense to me. Can anyone give me a clear and easily understandable explanation of what MOM is, and possibly some simple examples of how it's used outside of enterprise?

  • where's the programming content? – Mitch Wheat Oct 20 '10 at 7:12
  • 3
    As far as I can tell, SO has tons of non-programming questions. What is the best book for X? What are the use cases for Y? For instance, this question posted by you has no explicit programming content either (stackoverflow.com/questions/165985/…). I don't see the difference between those question and my own. I couldn't quite figure out what MOM is and what it's used for. It's clearly a technology of interest to programmers, and so I believe it fits quite nicely with the theme of SO. – jammur Oct 20 '10 at 8:23
  • while SO was more lax with such questions, its getting a bit more rigid in off-topic enforcement as the stackexchange family of websites grow. Many grandfathered questions would be closed as off topic now. Remember that programmers.stackexchange.com is available for non-programming but related discussions. As for this question, in my (fallible though it may be) judgement, it is answerable and on topic. – Will Oct 20 '10 at 11:46

Message-oriented middleware is a kind of infrastructure that uses message exchange rather than function calls / shared memory. It's a design principle, and as a result can be used anywhere. It's probably most useful in heterogeneous / high availability / high performance systems.

As I have just answered a somewhat similar question - I'd like to answer yours, but with few extra terminologies, in the end to clarify what MOM is in a practical way. Here are few plain English definition of few components (as the more you dig into MOM, these terms will come again and again eventually - and also the question is tagged rabbitmq):

  • MOM - is an approach, an architecture for distributed system i.e. a middle layer for the whole distributed system, where there's lot of internal communication (a component is querying data, and then needs to send it to the other component, which will be doing some processing on the data) so components have to share info/data among them.
  • Message broker - is any system (in MOM) with handles messages, or to be more precise which routes messages to the specific consumer/recipient. A Message Broker is typically built upon a MOM. The MOM provides the base communication among the applications, and things like message persistence and guaranteed delivery. "Message brokers are a building block of Message oriented middleware."
  • Rabbitmq - a message broker; a MOM implementation; an open-source implementation of AMQP; as per Wikipedia:

    RabbitMQ is an open source message broker software (sometimes called message-oriented middleware) that implements the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP).

I have mentioned Rabbitmq here, to further clarify MOM, in way it's been in use around us.


Message-Oriented-Middleware - is an approach, an architecture for distributed system i.e. a middle layer for the whole distributed system, where there's lot of internal communication so components have to share info/data among them, for example - a component is querying data, and then needs to send it to the other component, which will be doing some processing on the data. In short it's a way to design a system, and yes, depending upon the overall requirements i.e. we will be developing a distributed system, with some internal communication. The biggest advantage of MOM architecture/decision is decoupling of the components i.e. if we're going to change the data query component it'll have no effect on the data processing components, as they're communicating via MOM (e.g. Rabbitmq Cluster) - the data processing component is getting the data in form messages.

MOM at the end is just a design decision, that we use a middleware for gluing our system (distributed) components, a middleware for handling communication between them, in the form of messages (i.e. JSON).


A much relevant SO question and answer - Message broker vs. MOM (Message-Oriented Middleware)

Message-oriented middleware is a framework system for sending and receiving messages on computer and data networks. Middleware messaging provides the base for Broker, application servers, and business process automation.

See nice sketch that explains it http://www.onlinemq.com/wiki/index.php/Image:Flow-diagram.jpg

Using MOM messages are sent to the client are collected and stored till they are acted upon, while client continues other process.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.