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So I have windsor set up and all of my services registered. I have a class that requires these services in the ctor, but this class isn't registered with windsor as it does not have an interface and I don't want to give it one for the sake of dependency resolution. What I'm really interested in, is having windsor resolve and inject my registered dependencies and hand me back an initialized class -- basically a factory.

The problem that I'm running into is that windsor throws because the dependent class has not been registered:

void Main()
{
    var container = new WindsorContainer();
    container.Register(Component
        .For<ITestInterface>()
        .ImplementedBy<TestImpl>()
        .LifestyleTransient());

    var c = container.Resolve<TestClass>(); // throws because TestClass isn't registered
    c.Run();
}

public class TestClass
{
    private ITestInterface _d;

    public TestClass(ITestInterface d)
    {
        _d = d;
    }

    public void Run()
    {
        _d.Do();
    }
}

public interface ITestInterface
{
    void Do();
}

public class TestImpl : ITestInterface
{
    public void Do()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("done");      
    }
}

What I don't want to end up doing, is something like this:

var dependency1 = container.Resolve<ITestInterface>();
var c = new TestClass(dependency1);
c.Run();

Because now we're in service locator territory. But more importantly, classes that have several dependencies...well that could get tedious.

How can I get windsor to have the desired factory effect? Or is this even possible with Windsor? I recall this being possble with Ninject.

10
  • 1
    You can't get an IoC container to construct something it doesn't know about. It has to be registered. Why don't you register it? Components don't require separate interfaces for registration.
    – user47589
    Sep 28 '16 at 19:02
  • Realise that this is not pertinent to the question, but out of curiosity, why did you choose this over Ninject?
    – Dan-Cook
    Sep 28 '16 at 19:03
  • @Dan-Cook it's been a while since I've used ninject, but windsor just felt more natural and the set up took basically no effort at all. Sep 28 '16 at 20:05
  • 1
    Why don't just register the TestClass into your container directly? Component.For<TestClass>().LifestyleTransient() is enough.
    – Thuan
    Sep 29 '16 at 6:23
  • 1
    You have a very different idea about the role of using a container from me then. But that's fine. Your code, your choice :)
    – Thuan
    Sep 30 '16 at 2:49
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So the popular response seems to be "Just register the component" which I really don't like at all because for such a simple use case, I could end up with a config class with hundreds of unnecessary registrations. That's kind of silly. So in the meanwhile, until I discover some built in functionality for this, I've create a cheesy extension that should land me somewhere in the middle. This extension simply takes the type, registers it for you and then tries to resolve it. That way, it's leveraging Windsor's own ctor resolution logic:

public static class WindsorExtentions
{
    public static T Construct<T>(this IWindsorContainer container)
        where T : class
    {
        if (!container.Kernel.HasComponent(typeof(T)))
            container.Register(Component.For<T>());

        var instance = container.Resolve<T>();
        return instance;
    }
}

What I would really like to do is register it, resolve it, then unregister it, but it appears that the RemoveComponent method has been removed in 3.0. This should be fine in the meanwhile. It obviously isn't all-inclusive with use cases, but when you have loads of proxy classes that have several required dependencies to be injected, I think this helps.

Usage:

var myClassWithDependencies = myContainer.Construct<MyClassWithDependencies>();

public class MyClassWithDependencies
{
  public MyClassWithDependencies(
      IFacebookClient facebookClient,
      IGooglePlusClient googlePlusClient,
      ITwitterClient twitterClient,
      ISalesforceClient salesforceClient,
      IReportRepository reportRepo,
      IUserRepository userRepo)
    {

    }

}

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