165

Here's what I tried and how it goes wrong.

This works:

<div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{ __html: "<h1>Hi there!</h1>" }} />

This doesn't:

<div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{ __html: this.props.match.description }} />

The description property is just a normal string of HTML content. However it's rendered as a string, not as HTML for some reason.

enter image description here

Any suggestions?

11 Answers 11

52

Check if the text you're trying to append to the node is not escaped like this:

var prop = {
    match: {
        description: '&lt;h1&gt;Hi there!&lt;/h1&gt;'
    }
};

Instead of this:

var prop = {
    match: {
        description: '<h1>Hi there!</h1>'
    }
};

if is escaped you should convert it from your server-side.

The node is text because is escaped

The node is text because is escaped

The node is a dom node because isn't escaped

The node is a dom node because isn't escaped

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This was the issue. The description string was escaped HTML. I unescaped it and now it works fine. – Sergio Tapia Sep 29 '16 at 0:03
  • 4
    Please avoid using dangerouslySetInnerHTML instead use Fragment from react v16. Check the next answer by @brad-adams – Kunal Parekh May 22 '18 at 4:42
  • 3
    Appreciate the mention @KunalParekh, but they're different things. My answer is only valid if the html is located within your app (meaning it's actually JSX). To parse HTML from an external source to jsx you'd need to seek another solution. – Brad Adams Mar 5 '19 at 22:42
114

Does this.props.match.description Is a string or an object? If it's a string, it should be converted to HTML just fine. Example:

class App extends React.Component {

constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = {
      description: '<h1 style="color:red;">something</h1>'
    }
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{ __html: this.state.description }} />
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById('root'));

Result: http://codepen.io/ilanus/pen/QKgoLA?editors=1011

However if description: <h1 style="color:red;">something</h1> without the quotes '' you're going to get:

​Object {
$$typeof: [object Symbol] {},
  _owner: null,
  key: null,
  props: Object {
    children: "something",
    style: "color:red;"
  },
  ref: null,
  type: "h1"
}

If It's a string and you don't see any HTML markup the only problem i see is wrong markup..

UPDATE

If you are dealing with HTMLEntitles. You need to decode them before sending them to dangerouslySetInnerHTML that's why they called it dangerously :)

Working example:

class App extends React.Component {

  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = {
      description: '&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Our Opportunity:&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
    }
  }

   htmlDecode(input){
    var e = document.createElement('div');
    e.innerHTML = input;
    return e.childNodes.length === 0 ? "" : e.childNodes[0].nodeValue;
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{ __html: this.htmlDecode(this.state.description) }} />
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById('root'));
| improve this answer | |
  • this.props.match.description is a string, not an object. What do you mean with wrong markup? Do you mean unclosed tags? React should just render it no? – Sergio Tapia Sep 28 '16 at 22:31
  • Could you paste here console.log(this.props.match.description); – Ilanus Sep 28 '16 at 22:32
  • One example: &lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Our Opportunity:&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt; – Sergio Tapia Sep 28 '16 at 22:33
  • In this case you need either to use .innerHTML or decode HTMLEntities. – Ilanus Sep 28 '16 at 22:58
  • Return multiple lines or HTML code with tags: function htmlDecode(input){ var e = document.createElement('div'); e.innerHTML = input; var returnString = ''; for (index = 0; index < e.childNodes.length; index++) { // case of just a string if(e.childNodes[index].nodeValue){ returnString += e.childNodes[index].nodeValue; } // case of HTML if(e.childNodes[index].outerHTML){ returnString += e.childNodes[index].outerHTML; } } return returnString; } – Chris Adams Jan 2 at 15:38
60

I use 'react-html-parser'

yarn add react-html-parser
import ReactHtmlParser from 'react-html-parser'; 

<div> { ReactHtmlParser (html_string) } </div>

Source on npmjs.com

Lifting up @okram's comment for more visibility:

from its github description: Converts HTML strings directly into React components avoiding the need to use dangerouslySetInnerHTML from npmjs.com A utility for converting HTML strings into React components. Avoids the use of dangerouslySetInnerHTML and converts standard HTML elements, attributes and inline styles into their React equivalents.

| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    Does this library use "dangerouslySetInnerHTML" in the background? – Omar Oct 9 '19 at 5:51
  • 2
    from its github description: Converts HTML strings directly into React components avoiding the need to use dangerouslySetInnerHTML from npmjs.com A utility for converting HTML strings into React components. Avoids the use of dangerouslySetInnerHTML and converts standard HTML elements, attributes and inline styles into their React equivalents. – okram Jan 2 at 19:12
15

If you have control over where the string containing html is coming from (ie. somewhere in your app), you can benefit from the new <Fragment> API, doing something like:

import React, {Fragment} from 'react'

const stringsSomeWithHtml = {
  testOne: (
    <Fragment>
      Some text <strong>wrapped with strong</strong>
    </Fragment>
  ),
  testTwo: `This is just a plain string, but it'll print fine too`,
}

...

render() {
  return <div>{stringsSomeWithHtml[prop.key]}</div>
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    There is no string containing html in your example. It's either jsx or plain string. – mrkvon Dec 19 '18 at 18:36
  • 3
    Well, yeah technically you're correct @mrkvon, however as I mention, this solution is only valid if said "html"/jsx is something you have control over. Not for rendering some raw html provided via an API, for example. Prior to the Fragment API it was always a pain for me, that required additional span wraps that would sometimes mess with flex layouts. When I stumbled upon this question looking for a possible solution I thought I'd share how I got around things. – Brad Adams Jan 25 '19 at 21:26
  • 2
    Thanks! This was the only solution that worked in my case. Also, responding to mrkvon's comment on this answer : This answer indeed contains html i.e Some text <strong>wrapped with strong</strong> contains html tag strong. – Binita Bharati Nov 15 '19 at 12:39
  • @BinitaBharati But that's not a string though. If you get a string from an API like "<p>This is a String</p>"(or simply store a string in a variable), when you put this string in <Fragment>, the output will still contain the <p> tag. – Muchdecal Mar 23 at 22:53
  • 1
    @BradAdams. Nice trick though. I can see the instances where it becomes handy. – Muchdecal Mar 24 at 18:20
7

You just use dangerouslySetInnerHTML method of React

<div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{ __html: htmlString }} />

Or you can implement more with this easy way: Render the HTML raw in React app

| improve this answer | |
6

dangerouslySetInnerHTML

dangerouslySetInnerHTML is React’s replacement for using innerHTML in the browser DOM. In general, setting HTML from code is risky because it’s easy to inadvertently expose your users to a cross-site scripting (XSS) attack. So, you can set HTML directly from React, but you have to type out dangerouslySetInnerHTML and pass an object with a __html key, to remind yourself that it’s dangerous. For example:

function createMarkup() {
  return {__html: 'First &middot; Second'};
}

function MyComponent() {
  return <div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={createMarkup()} />;
}
| improve this answer | |
3

I use innerHTML together a ref to span:

import React, { useRef, useEffect, useState } from 'react';

export default function Sample() {
  const spanRef = useRef<HTMLSpanElement>(null);
  const [someHTML,] = useState("some <b>bold</b>");

  useEffect(() => {
    if (spanRef.current) {
      spanRef.current.innerHTML = someHTML;
    }
  }, [spanRef.current, someHTML]);

  return <div>
    my custom text follows<br />
    <span ref={spanRef} />
  </div>
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I like this, no need for additional libraries or reliance on server-side when you don't have that luxury. Inspired by you, but in a class component I did componentDidMount() { this.message.current.innerHTML = this.state.selectedMessage.body; } body is the escaped html for me. – webhound May 15 at 19:40
2

In my case, I used react-render-html

First install the package by npm i --save react-render-html

then,

import renderHTML from 'react-render-html';

renderHTML("<a class='github' href='https://github.com'><b>GitHub</b></a>")
| improve this answer | |
1

I could not get npm build to work with react-html-parser. However, in my case, I was able to successfully make use of https://reactjs.org/docs/fragments.html. I had a requirement to show few html unicode characters , but they should not be directly embedded in the JSX. Within the JSX, it had to be picked from the Component's state. Component code snippet is given below :

constructor() 
{
this.state = {
      rankMap : {"5" : <Fragment>&#9733; &#9733; &#9733; &#9733; &#9733;</Fragment> , 
                 "4" : <Fragment>&#9733; &#9733; &#9733; &#9733; &#9734;</Fragment>, 
                 "3" : <Fragment>&#9733; &#9733; &#9733; &#9734; &#9734;</Fragment> , 
                 "2" : <Fragment>&#9733; &#9733; &#9734; &#9734; &#9734;</Fragment>, 
                 "1" : <Fragment>&#9733; &#9734; &#9734; &#9734; &#9734;</Fragment>}
                };
}

render() 
{
       return (<div class="card-footer">
                    <small class="text-muted">{ this.state.rankMap["5"] }</small>
               </div>);
}
| improve this answer | |
0

i use https://www.npmjs.com/package/html-to-react

const HtmlToReactParser = require('html-to-react').Parser;
let htmlInput = html.template;
let htmlToReactParser = new HtmlToReactParser();
let reactElement = htmlToReactParser.parse(htmlInput); 
return(<div>{reactElement}</div>)
| improve this answer | |
-2

If you have control to the {this.props.match.description} and if you are using JSX. I would recommend not to use "dangerouslySetInnerHTML".

// In JSX, you can define a html object rather than a string to contain raw HTML
let description = <h1>Hi there!</h1>;

// Here is how you print
return (
    {description}
);
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.