Background: I'm trying to use React to update some UI elements based on a json response from some webservice, however because I have a lot of elements to be rendered, I'm trying to lessen bandwidth by only pulling json if an element's HashCode is updated. In the context of my application I cannot update the asynchronous behavior of my ajax calls. What would be the right way to force the update to my elements only after the asynchronous call is completed?
I realize setting state in WillUpdate is wrong.

Example:

    getInitialState: function getInitialState() {
        return { hash: 0, json: {}};
    },

    //Only get the step asJSON if the hash is updated
    shouldComponentUpdate: function(nextProps, nextState) {
        return this.state.json.hash != nextState.json.hash;
    },

    tick: function(){
        this.updateHash();
    },

    updateHash: function updateHash(){
        something.getUpdateHash(function(data){
            var hashR = data.responseJSON;
            this.setState({hash: hashR});
        }.bind(this));
    },

    updateJSON: function(){
        //This is an asynchronous call
        something.getJSON(function(data){
            var stepJ = jQuery.parseJSON(data.responseJSON);
            this.setState({json: stepJ});
        }.bind(this));
    },

    componentWillMount: function(){
        this.updateJSON();
    },

    componentDidMount: function(){
        this.interval = setInterval(this.tick, 10000);
    },

   componentWillUpdate: function(nextState, nextProps){
       //Way to update json state w/o affecting state? 
   },

    render: function render() { 
       /** Only do render after updateJSON is complete **/
   }

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about call updateJSON in callback of updateHash

updateHash: function updateHash(){
    something.getUpdateHash(function(data){
        var hashR = data.responseJSON;
        if(hashR!==this.state.hash){
            this.updateJSON(hashR)
        }
    }.bind(this));
},

updateJSON: function(hash){
    //This is an asynchronous call
    something.getJSON(function(data){
        var stepJ = jQuery.parseJSON(data.responseJSON);
        this.setState({json: stepJ,hash});
    }.bind(this));
},
  • I hadn't thought of that! Thanks +1 – Chrizt0f Sep 29 '16 at 13:13

If I am understanding correctly, you are wanting to update the DOM only if some action (checking hash) happens in the future. I find that pulling that sort of logic out of the container displaying the logic is more helpful and leads to using alot of stateless components which I find far easier to reason about.

// The component that you are housing everything in now
// seconds would be your JSON
const ActualDisplay = ({seconds}) => <div>It has been {seconds} since started</div>

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props){
    super(props)
    this.state = {
      seconds: 0
    }
  }
  // This is so we can mimic the future checks
  componentWillMount(){
    let seconds = this.state.seconds
    setInterval(()=>{
      this.maybeUpdate(seconds)
      seconds++
    },1000)
  };
  // This is where you say 'if my hash is different, set state'
  maybeUpdate = (seconds) =>{
    console.log(seconds)
    if(seconds % 10 === 0){
      this.setState({
        seconds
      })
    }
  };

  render() {
    // And because we are updating the state of THIS container
    // we can just say 'Hey, whatever the state is of this, pass it down
    return <ActualDisplay seconds={this.state.seconds} />
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <App />,
  document.getElementById('mount')
)
  • 1
    Interesting approach! I see how you removed the state of seconds to only 'react' from within scope of maybeUpdate. In my example the seconds modulo would be replaced with some wasHashUpdated logic. The reason I would prefer the use of a callback is to maintain the 'mold' (e.g. didMount, tick etc.) of react api, and further enforce the hashUpdate -> jsonUpdate correlation – Chrizt0f Sep 29 '16 at 13:50

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