735

In order to duplicate an array in JavaScript: Which of the following is faster to use?

Slice method

var dup_array = original_array.slice();

For loop

for(var i = 0, len = original_array.length; i < len; ++i)
   dup_array[i] = original_array[i];

I know both ways do only a shallow copy: if original_array contains references to objects, objects won't be cloned, but only the references will be copied, and therefore both arrays will have references to the same objects. But this is not the point of this question.

I'm asking only about speed.

2

25 Answers 25

885

There are at least 6 (!) ways to clone an array:

  • loop
  • slice
  • Array.from()
  • concat
  • spread operator (FASTEST)
  • map A.map(function(e){return e;});

There has been a huuuge BENCHMARKS thread, providing following information:

  • for blink browsers slice() is the fastest method, concat() is a bit slower, and while loop is 2.4x slower.

  • for other browsers while loop is the fastest method, since those browsers don't have internal optimizations for slice and concat.

This remains true in Jul 2016.

Below are simple scripts that you can copy-paste into your browser's console and run several times to see the picture. They output milliseconds, lower is better.

while loop

n = 1000*1000;
start = + new Date();
a = Array(n); 
b = Array(n); 
i = a.length;
while(i--) b[i] = a[i];
console.log(new Date() - start);

slice

n = 1000*1000;
start = + new Date();
a = Array(n); 
b = a.slice();
console.log(new Date() - start);

Please note that these methods will clone the Array object itself, array contents however are copied by reference and are not deep cloned.

origAr == clonedArr //returns false
origAr[0] == clonedArr[0] //returns true
19
  • 55
    @cept0 no emotions, just benchmarks jsperf.com/new-array-vs-splice-vs-slice/31
    – Dan
    Jun 13, 2014 at 21:22
  • 3
    @Dan So what? Your test case results: Firefox 30 nightly is still ~230% faster than Chrome. Check the source code of V8 for splice and you'll be surprised (while...)
    – mate64
    Jun 14, 2014 at 6:22
  • 5
    Sadly for short arrays the answer is vastly different. For example cloning an array of listeners before calling each of them. Those arrays are often small, usually 1 element.
    – gman
    Feb 13, 2015 at 2:05
  • 8
    You missed this method: A.map(function(e){return e;});
    – wcochran
    Sep 7, 2016 at 18:25
  • 15
    You're writing about blink browsers. Isn't blink just a layout engine, mainly affecting HTML rendering, and thus unimportant? I thought we'd rather talk about V8, Spidermonkey and friends here. Just a thing that confused me. Enlighten me, if I'm wrong.
    – Neonit
    Oct 30, 2016 at 9:58
302

Technically slice is the fastest way. However, it is even faster if you add the 0 begin index.

myArray.slice(0);

is faster than

myArray.slice();

https://jsben.ch/F0SZ3

6
  • And is myArray.slice(0,myArray.length-1); faster than myArray.slice(0); ?
    – jave.web
    May 17, 2016 at 20:04
  • 9
    @jave.web you;ve just dropped last element of the array. Full copy is array.slice(0) or array.slice(0, array.length) Jan 4, 2018 at 21:05
  • This is incorrect, at least on my machine and according to your own benchmarks. Aug 13, 2020 at 12:50
  • 4
    The link is dead.
    – kschiffer
    Oct 13, 2020 at 11:55
  • 2
    jsben.ch/56xWo - sometimes, slice() is faster, sometimes slice(0), both only marginally so (in Firefox 56 and latest Vivaldi, Chrome-based). But slice(0, length) is always noticeably slower (except that it's the fastest in Firefox 87).
    – f2d
    Apr 3, 2021 at 17:46
180

what about es6 way?

arr2 = [...arr1];
8
  • 28
    if converted with babel: [].concat(_slice.call(arguments))
    – CHAN
    Jul 27, 2015 at 8:08
  • 1
    Not sure where arguments is coming from... I think your babel output is conflating a few different features. It's more likely to be arr2 = [].concat(arr1). Sep 28, 2016 at 5:54
  • 3
    @SterlingArcher arr2 = [].conact(arr1) is different from arr2 = [...arr1]. [...arr1] syntax will convert hole to undefined. For example, arr1 = Array(1); arr2 = [...arr1]; arr3 = [].concat(arr1); 0 in arr2 !== 0 in arr3.
    – tsh
    Dec 28, 2016 at 9:34
  • 2
    I tested this in my browser (Chrome 59.0.3071.115) against Dan's answer above. It was more than 10 times slower than .slice(). n = 1000*1000; start = + new Date(); a = Array(n); b = [...a]; console.log(new Date() - start); // 168 Jul 8, 2017 at 7:58
  • 3
    Still will not clone something like this: [{a: 'a', b: {c: 'c'}}]. If c's value is changed in the "duplicated" array, it will change in the original array, since it's just a referential copy, not a clone. Feb 6, 2019 at 9:59
53

Easiest way to deep clone Array or Object:

var dup_array = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(original_array))
7
  • 72
    Important note for beginners: because this depends upon JSON, this also inherits its limitations. Among other things, that means your array cannot contain undefined or any functions. Both of those will be converted to null for you during the JSON.stringify process. Other strategies, such as (['cool','array']).slice() will not change them but also do not deep clone objects within the array. So there is a tradeoff. Oct 7, 2014 at 14:01
  • 34
    Very bad perf and don't work with special objects like DOM, date, regexp, function ... or prototyped objects. Don't support cyclic references. You should never use JSON for deep clone.
    – Yukulélé
    Dec 11, 2015 at 17:57
  • 20
    worst possible way! Only use if for some issue all other doesn't work. It's slow, it's resources intense and it has all JSON limitations already mentioned in comments. Can't imagine how it got 25 up-votes. Jul 24, 2016 at 13:12
  • 4
    It deep copies arrays with primitives, and where properties are arrays with further primitives/arrays. For that it is ok.
    – Drenai
    Aug 6, 2016 at 20:21
  • 5
    I tested this in my browser (Chrome 59.0.3071.115) against Dan's answer above. It was nearly 20 times slower than .slice(). n = 1000*1000; start = + new Date(); a = Array(n); var b = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(a)) console.log(new Date() - start); // 221 Jul 8, 2017 at 8:02
41

🏁 Fastest Way to Clone an Array

I made this very plain utility function to test the time that it takes to clone an array. It is not 100% reliable however it can give you a bulk idea as for how long it takes to clone an existing array:

function clone(fn) {
  const arr = [...Array(1000000)];
  console.time('timer');
  fn(arr);
  console.timeEnd('timer');
}

And tested different approach:

1)   5.79ms -> clone(arr => Object.values(arr));
2)   7.23ms -> clone(arr => [].concat(arr));
3)   9.13ms -> clone(arr => arr.slice());
4)  24.04ms -> clone(arr => { const a = []; for (let val of arr) { a.push(val); } return a; });
5)  30.02ms -> clone(arr => [...arr]);
6)  39.72ms -> clone(arr => JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(arr)));
7)  99.80ms -> clone(arr => arr.map(i => i));
8) 259.29ms -> clone(arr => Object.assign([], arr));
9) Maximum call stack size exceeded -> clone(arr => Array.of(...arr));

UPDATE:

  1. Tests were made back in 2018, so today most likely you'll get different result with current browsers.
  2. Out of all of those, the only way to deep clone an array is by using JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(arr)).

    That said, do not use the above if your array might include functions as it will return null.
    Thank you @GilEpshtain for this update.

I ran @mesqueeb's Benchmark in Chrome and Firefox. slice() still seems to be a quite good option.

Chrome 95.0: Chrome Array duplication benchmark

Firefox 94.0: Firefox Array duplication benchmark

8
  • 6
    I tried benchmarking your answer and I got very different results: jsben.ch/o5nLG
    – mesqueeb
    Feb 25, 2019 at 1:02
  • @mesqueeb, the tests might change, depending on ur machine of course. However, feel free to update the answer with your test result. Nice work!
    – Lior Elrom
    Feb 25, 2019 at 2:51
  • 1
    I like your answer a lot, however I try your test and get that arr => arr.slice() is the fastest. Feb 26, 2019 at 12:41
  • 1
    @LiorElrom, your update isn't correct, due to the fact that methods aren't serializable. For example: JSON.parse(JSON.stringify([function(){}])) will output [null] Feb 26, 2019 at 14:15
  • 2
    Nice benchmark. I've tested this on my Mac in 2 browsers: Chrome Version 81.0.4044.113 and Safari Version 13.1 (15609.1.20.111.8) and fastest is spread operation: [...arr] with 4.653076171875ms in Chrome and 8.565ms in Safari. Second fast in Chrome is slice function arr.slice() with 6.162109375ms and in Safari second is [].concat(arr) with 13.018ms.
    – edufinn
    Apr 23, 2020 at 8:57
37
var cloned_array = [].concat(target_array);
7
  • 4
    Please explain what this does.
    – Jed Fox
    Oct 5, 2016 at 16:54
  • 12
    While this code snippet may answer the question, it doesn't provide any context to explain how or why. Consider adding a sentence or two to explain your answer. Oct 5, 2016 at 18:39
  • 41
    I hate this kind of comments. It's obvious what it does! Oct 24, 2016 at 18:21
  • 7
    A simple answer for a simple quetions, no big story to read. I like this kind of answers +1
    – Achim
    Dec 9, 2016 at 9:41
  • 21
    "I'm asking only about speed" - This answer gives no indication on speed. That is the main question being asked. brandonscript has a good point. More information is needed to consider this an answer. But if it were a simpler question, this would be an excellent answer. Jan 9, 2017 at 4:21
26

I put together a quick demo: http://jsbin.com/agugo3/edit

My results on Internet Explorer 8 are 156, 782, and 750, which would indicate slice is much faster in this case.

1
  • 1
    Don't forget the additional cost of the garbage collector if you have to do this very fast a lot. I was copying each neighbour array for each cell in my cellular automata using slice and it was much slower than reusing a previous array and copying the values. Chrome indicated about 40% of the total time was spent garbage collecting.
    – Drakarah
    Oct 11, 2013 at 19:31
22

a.map(e => e) is another alternative for this job. As of today .map() is very fast (almost as fast as .slice(0)) in Firefox, but not in Chrome.

On the other hand, if an array is multi-dimensional, since arrays are objects and objects are reference types, none of the slice or concat methods will be a cure... So one proper way of cloning an array is an invention of Array.prototype.clone() as follows.

Array.prototype.clone = function(){
  return this.map(e => Array.isArray(e) ? e.clone() : e);
};

var arr = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, [ 1, 2, [ 1, 2, 3 ], 4 , 5], 6 ],
    brr = arr.clone();
brr[4][2][1] = "two";
console.log(JSON.stringify(arr));
console.log(JSON.stringify(brr));

1
  • Not bad, but unfortunately this doesn't work if you have Object in your array :\ JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(myArray)) works better in this case.
    – GBMan
    Apr 24, 2020 at 22:33
13

Fastest way to clone an Array of Objects will be using spread operator

var clonedArray=[...originalArray]
or
var clonedArray = originalArray.slice(0); //with 0 index it's little bit faster than normal slice()

but the objects inside that cloned array will still pointing at the old memory location. hence change to clonedArray objects will also change the orignalArray. So

var clonedArray = originalArray.map(({...ele}) => {return ele})

this will not only create new array but also the objects will be cloned to.

disclaimer if you are working with nested object in that case spread operator will work as SHALLOW CLONE. At that point better to use

var clonedArray=JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(originalArray));
2
  • 1
    You are the only one who noticed the memory location. Extra points for that!!
    – JRichardsz
    Feb 7 at 1:35
  • Thank you so much for emphasizing the memory location. Actually, that's probably the main reason why you need a 'decoupled' array clone. Aug 26 at 0:49
9

Take a look at: link. It's not about speed, but comfort. Besides as you can see you can only use slice(0) on primitive types.

To make an independent copy of an array rather than a copy of the refence to it, you can use the array slice method.

Example:

To make an independent copy of an array rather than a copy of the refence to it, you can use the array slice method.

var oldArray = ["mip", "map", "mop"];
var newArray = oldArray.slice();

To copy or clone an object :

function cloneObject(source) {
    for (i in source) {
        if (typeof source[i] == 'source') {
            this[i] = new cloneObject(source[i]);
        }
        else{
            this[i] = source[i];
  }
    }
}

var obj1= {bla:'blabla',foo:'foofoo',etc:'etc'};
var obj2= new cloneObject(obj1);

Source: link

2
  • 2
    The primitive types comment applies to the for loop in the question as well.
    – user113716
    Oct 20, 2010 at 13:56
  • 4
    if I were copying an array of objects, I would expect the new array to reference the same objects rather than cloning the objects.
    – lincolnk
    Oct 20, 2010 at 14:14
8

ECMAScript 2015 way with the Spread operator:

Basic examples:

var copyOfOldArray = [...oldArray]
var twoArraysBecomeOne = [...firstArray, ..seccondArray]

Try in the browser console:

var oldArray = [1, 2, 3]
var copyOfOldArray = [...oldArray]
console.log(oldArray)
console.log(copyOfOldArray)

var firstArray = [5, 6, 7]
var seccondArray = ["a", "b", "c"]
var twoArraysBecomOne = [...firstArray, ...seccondArray]
console.log(twoArraysBecomOne);

References

2
  • Probably the only thing that is fast with the spread is to type it. It is waaay less performant than other ways of doing it.
    – XT_Nova
    Jan 26, 2018 at 9:58
  • 3
    Please provide some links about your argument.
    – Marian07
    Jan 26, 2018 at 13:25
7

As @Dan said "This answer becomes outdated fast. Use benchmarks to check the actual situation", there is one specific answer from jsperf that has not had an answer for itself: while:

var i = a.length;
while(i--) { b[i] = a[i]; }

had 960,589 ops/sec with the runnerup a.concat() at 578,129 ops/sec, which is 60%.

This is the lastest Firefox (40) 64 bit.


@aleclarson created a new, more reliable benchmark.

4
  • 1
    You should really link the jsperf. The one you are thinking of is broken, because a new array is created in every test case, except the 'while loop' test.
    – aleclarson
    May 13, 2018 at 12:58
  • 1
    I made a new jsperf that is more accurate: jsperf.com/clone-array-3
    – aleclarson
    May 13, 2018 at 13:25
  • 60% what? 60% faster? Oct 20, 2018 at 10:28
  • 1
    @PeterMortensen: 587192 is ~60% (61.1...) of 960589.
    – serv-inc
    Oct 20, 2018 at 13:09
7

Benchmark time!

function log(data) {
  document.getElementById("log").textContent += data + "\n";
}

benchmark = (() => {
  time_function = function(ms, f, num) {
    var z = 0;
    var t = new Date().getTime();
    for (z = 0;
      ((new Date().getTime() - t) < ms); z++)
      f(num);
    return (z)
  }

  function clone1(arr) {
    return arr.slice(0);
  }

  function clone2(arr) {
    return [...arr]
  }

  function clone3(arr) {
    return [].concat(arr);
  }

  Array.prototype.clone = function() {
    return this.map(e => Array.isArray(e) ? e.clone() : e);
  };

  function clone4(arr) {
    return arr.clone();
  }


  function benchmark() {
    function compare(a, b) {
      if (a[1] > b[1]) {
        return -1;
      }
      if (a[1] < b[1]) {
        return 1;
      }
      return 0;
    }

    funcs = [clone1, clone2, clone3, clone4];
    results = [];
    funcs.forEach((ff) => {
      console.log("Benchmarking: " + ff.name);
      var s = time_function(2500, ff, Array(1024));
      results.push([ff, s]);
      console.log("Score: " + s);

    })
    return results.sort(compare);
  }
  return benchmark;
})()
log("Starting benchmark...\n");
res = benchmark();

console.log("Winner: " + res[0][0].name + " !!!");
count = 1;
res.forEach((r) => {
  log((count++) + ". " + r[0].name + " score: " + Math.floor(10000 * r[1] / res[0][1]) / 100 + ((count == 2) ? "% *winner*" : "% speed of winner.") + " (" + Math.round(r[1] * 100) / 100 + ")");
});
log("\nWinner code:\n");
log(res[0][0].toString());
<textarea rows="50" cols="80" style="font-size: 16; resize:none; border: none;" id="log"></textarea>

The benchmark will run for 10s since you click the button.

My results:

Chrome (V8 engine):

1. clone1 score: 100% *winner* (4110764)
2. clone3 score: 74.32% speed of winner. (3055225)
3. clone2 score: 30.75% speed of winner. (1264182)
4. clone4 score: 21.96% speed of winner. (902929)

Firefox (SpiderMonkey Engine):

1. clone1 score: 100% *winner* (8448353)
2. clone3 score: 16.44% speed of winner. (1389241)
3. clone4 score: 5.69% speed of winner. (481162)
4. clone2 score: 2.27% speed of winner. (192433)

Winner code:

function clone1(arr) {
    return arr.slice(0);
}

Winner engine:

SpiderMonkey (Mozilla/Firefox)

6

It depends on the browser. If you look in the blog post Array.prototype.slice vs manual array creation, there is a rough guide to performance of each:

Enter image description here

Results:

Enter image description here

3
  • 1
    arguments is not a proper array and he's using call to force slice to run on the collection. results may be misleading.
    – lincolnk
    Oct 20, 2010 at 14:17
  • Yeh I meant to mention that in my post that these stats would probably change now with the broswers improving, but it gives a general idea.
    – kyndigs
    Oct 20, 2010 at 14:41
  • 2
    @diugalde I think the only situation where posting code as a picture is acceptable is when the code is potentially dangerous and should not be copy-pasted. In this case though, it's quite ridiculous. Jun 3, 2016 at 0:49
6

There is a much cleaner solution:

var srcArray = [1, 2, 3];
var clonedArray = srcArray.length === 1 ? [srcArray[0]] : Array.apply(this, srcArray);

The length check is required, because the Array constructor behaves differently when it is called with exactly one argument.

4
  • 2
    But is it the fastest? Apr 28, 2014 at 13:59
  • 15
    More semantic than splice(), perhaps. But really, apply and this is all but intuitive. May 26, 2014 at 13:42
  • shows the slowest performance on chrome- jsperf.com/new-array-vs-splice-vs-slice/113
    – chrismarx
    Feb 29, 2016 at 16:15
  • 3
    You can use Array.of and ignore the length: Array.of.apply(Array, array)
    – Oriol
    Nov 12, 2016 at 16:54
6

Remember .slice() won't work for two-dimensional arrays. You'll need a function like this:

function copy(array) {
  return array.map(function(arr) {
    return arr.slice();
  });
}
1
  • 4
    In Javascript there aren't two-dimensional arrays. There are just arrays containing arrays. What you are trying to do is a deep copy which is not required in the question.
    – Aloso
    Jan 4, 2017 at 21:19
5

It depends on the length of the array. If the array length is <= 1,000,000, the slice and concat methods are taking approximately the same time. But when you give a wider range, the concat method wins.

For example, try this code:

var original_array = [];
for(var i = 0; i < 10000000; i ++) {
    original_array.push( Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000000 + 1));
}

function a1() {
    var dup = [];
    var start = Date.now();
    dup = original_array.slice();
    var end = Date.now();
    console.log('slice method takes ' + (end - start) + ' ms');
}

function a2() {
    var dup = [];
    var start = Date.now();
    dup = original_array.concat([]);
    var end = Date.now();
    console.log('concat method takes ' + (end - start) + ' ms');
}

function a3() {
    var dup = [];
    var start = Date.now();
    for(var i = 0; i < original_array.length; i ++) {
        dup.push(original_array[i]);
    }
    var end = Date.now();
    console.log('for loop with push method takes ' + (end - start) + ' ms');
}

function a4() {
    var dup = [];
    var start = Date.now();
    for(var i = 0; i < original_array.length; i ++) {
        dup[i] = original_array[i];
    }
    var end = Date.now();
    console.log('for loop with = method takes ' + (end - start) + ' ms');
}

function a5() {
    var dup = new Array(original_array.length)
    var start = Date.now();
    for(var i = 0; i < original_array.length; i ++) {
        dup.push(original_array[i]);
    }
    var end = Date.now();
    console.log('for loop with = method and array constructor takes ' + (end - start) + ' ms');
}

a1();
a2();
a3();
a4();
a5();

If you set the length of original_array to 1,000,000, the slice method and concat method are taking approximately the same time (3-4 ms, depending on the random numbers).

If you set the length of original_array to 10,000,000, then the slice method takes over 60 ms and the concat method takes over 20 ms.

1
  • dup.push is wrong in a5, instead dup[i] = should be used
    – 4esn0k
    Sep 5, 2017 at 6:44
4

In ES6, you can simply utilize the Spread syntax.

Example:

let arr = ['a', 'b', 'c'];
let arr2 = [...arr];

Please note that the spread operator generates a completely new array, so modifying one won't affect the other.

Example:

arr2.push('d') // becomes ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
console.log(arr) // while arr retains its values ['a', 'b', 'c']
4

There were several ways to clone an array. Basically, Cloning was categorized in two ways:

  1. Shallow copy
  2. Deep copy

Shallow copies only cover the 1st level of the array and the rest are referenced. If you want a true copy of nested elements in the arrays, you’ll need a deep clone.

Example :

const arr1 = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]           
// Normal Array (shallow copy is enough)     
const arr2 = [1,2,3,[4],[[5]],6,7]          
// Nested Array  (Deep copy required) 


Approach 1 : Using (...)Spread Operator  (Shallow copy enough)
const newArray = [...arr1] // [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]

Approach 2 : Using Array builtIn Slice method (Deep copy)  
const newArray = arr1.slice()  // [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]

Approach 3 : Using Array builtIn Concat method (Deep a copy)
const newArray = [].concat(arr1)  // [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]

Approach 4 : Using JSON.stringify/parse. (Deep a copy & fastest)
const newArray = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(arr2));)  // [1,2,3,[4],[[5]],6,7]

Approach 5: Using own recursive function or using loadash's __.cloneDeep method. (Deep copy)
3

A simple solution:

original = [1,2,3]
cloned = original.map(x=>x)
0
3
        const arr = ['1', '2', '3'];

         // Old way
        const cloneArr = arr.slice();

        // ES6 way
        const cloneArrES6 = [...arr];

// But problem with 3rd approach is that if you are using muti-dimensional 
 // array, then only first level is copied

        const nums = [
              [1, 2], 
              [10],
         ];

        const cloneNums = [...nums];

// Let's change the first item in the first nested item in our cloned array.

        cloneNums[0][0] = '8';

        console.log(cloneNums);
           // [ [ '8', 2 ], [ 10 ], [ 300 ] ]

        // NOOooo, the original is also affected
        console.log(nums);
          // [ [ '8', 2 ], [ 10 ], [ 300 ] ]

So, in order to avoid these scenarios to happen, use

        const arr = ['1', '2', '3'];

        const cloneArr = Array.from(arr);
1
  • It's a valid thing to point out about how changing cloneNums[0][0] in your example propagated the change to nums[0][0] - but that's because the nums[0][0] is effectively an object whose reference is copied into cloneNums by the spread operator. All that is to say, this behaviour won't affect code where we are copying by value (int, string etc literals).
    – Aditya M P
    Jul 18, 2019 at 8:45
1

Fast ways to duplicate an array in JavaScript in Order:

#1: array1copy = [...array1];

#2: array1copy = array1.slice(0);

#3: array1copy = array1.slice();

If your array objects contain some JSON-non-serializable content (functions, Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY, etc.) better to use

array1copy = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(array1))

1

You can follow this code. Immutable way array clone. This is the perfect way to array cloning


const array = [1, 2, 3, 4]

const newArray = [...array]
newArray.push(6)
console.log(array)
console.log(newArray)
1

If you want a REAL cloned object/array in JS with cloned references of all attributes and sub-objects:

export function clone(arr) {
    return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(arr))
}

ALL other operations do not create clones, because they just change the base address of the root element, not of the included objects.

Except you traverse recursive through the object-tree.

For a simple copy, these are OK. For storage address relevant operations I suggest (and in most all other cases, because this is fast!) to type convert into string and back in a complete new object.

0

If you are taking about slice it is used to copy elements from an array and create a clone with same no. of elements or less no. of elements.

var arr = [1, 2, 3 , 4, 5];

function slc() {
  var sliced = arr.slice(0, 5);
// arr.slice(position to start copying master array , no. of items in new array)
  console.log(sliced);
}
slc(arr);

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