Im trying to figure out how to compare the argv[1] value with a couple of test cases. I would like to see if argv[1] is ending with a particular char value. So far I have the following code:

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
char strin[250];
int length;
printf("The argument supplied is %s\n", argv[1]);
strcpy(strin,argv[1]);
length = strlen(strin);
printf("Testing: %c",strin[length]);
    if( strin[length] = 'b')
    {
    printf("b in the input");
    }

}

But for some reason whenever I put in any input the print statement triggers. How would I check to see if the last character in the command line argument is equal to the character that I have set it equal to?

  • 1
    strin[length] -> strin[length - 1] – Paul R Sep 30 '16 at 14:54
  • also use == instead of = in your test – Nicolas Jean Sep 30 '16 at 15:20
  • 1
    assignment: strin[length] = 'b'; comparison: strin[length] == 'b' – pmg Sep 30 '16 at 15:21
  • Why you've edited away the code? – HolyBlackCat Sep 30 '16 at 20:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Basically, all you need is to do is the following:

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    // check if there's an argument to test
    if (1 > argc) {
        // extract the position of the last character
        int last_pos = strlen(argv[1])-1;
        // compare the last character with the character "b"
        if (0 <= last_pos && 'b' == argv[1][last_pos]) {
            printf("Hoora! The input ends with b!");
            return 0;
        } else {
            printf("Bummer… The input does not end with b :(");
        }
    } else {
        printf("there's no argument to test!");
    }
}

Now, here's a summary of what's wrong:

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
char strin[250];
int length;
printf("The argument supplied is %s\n", argv[1]);

// you're doing a copy from the first argument into the
// variable strin. If argv[1] is 251 characters, you'll
// overwrite memory, and will cause a "buffer overflow".
// Whenever you need to do strcpy of data input by a user
// use strncpy().
strcpy(strin,argv[1]);

// you're extracting the /length/ of the string, not the /position/
// of the last character, so when you're trying to access at index
// length, you'll get data from one character beyond the array.
length = strlen(strin);

// so here you're seeing a random value from the memory of your computer
printf("Testing: %c",strin[length]);

// here you made a mistake and you're assigning the value 'b' to the
// value beyond the allocated memory for the array. Basically: 
// Here be dragons.

// To avoid that mistake, always put the value you're comparing against
// in a comparaison on the Left Hand Side, and the value you're comparing
// on the right hand side. Then the compiler will yell at you!
    if( strin[length] = 'b')
    {
    printf("b in the input");
    }

}
  • 1
    You forgot to check that argv[1] wasn't length 0 (last_pos might be negative). – rabensky Sep 30 '16 at 21:21
  • Thank you, fixed! – zmo Sep 30 '16 at 21:24
  • 0 <= last_pos ;P – rabensky Sep 30 '16 at 21:25
  • But that's what I wrote 😇 – zmo Sep 30 '16 at 21:26

C arrays are zero-index based. To access the first element you do array[0], to access the 10th you do array[9].

printf("Testing: %c",strin[length]);

This prints out the character 1 after the last character in the string, which happens to be the null terminator \0. (that's how C strings work)

if( strin[length] = 'b')
{
  printf("b in the input");
}

This doesn't compare, you should use == instead. This also suffers from the same problem as above.

So, change your accessing to [length - 1] and use ==.

  • On the arrays being zero-indexed: Yeah, but why would you want to check argv[0] for user input? Its value is determined by the launching process (ie the shell). To check user provided arguments, you have to start at argv[1] – Elias Van Ootegem Sep 30 '16 at 16:43
  • @EliasVanOotegem That wasn't my point, my point was that the OP might've thought that [length] would point to the length'th element, which is not the case, it's -1. – Sombrero Chicken Sep 30 '16 at 17:02

Strings are 0-terminated and indexing begins at 0. But strlen() doesn't count the terminator.

So strin[length] is always the 0-terminator, you need strin[length - 1] to get the last character. And of course you can only do that if length > 0 is true.

Comparisons in C are done using the == operator, the single = is assignment which is not what you want.

Also there's no point in copying the string, you can check in argv[1] directly; and strlen() return size_t, not int.

As others have said the last character in the string is strlen() - 1. You have another issue because you are using strcpy. If you have more than 250 characters in the argument string it is very unsafe. So you need to use strncpy for safety.

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
char strin[250];
int length;
printf("The argument supplied is %s\n", argv[1]);
strncpy(strin,argv[1], 250);
length = strlen(strin);
printf("Testing: %c",strin[length-1]);
    if( strin[length] = 'b')
    {
    printf("b in the input\n");
    }
}
  • If he just wants to test the last character, there's no need to make the copy at all. – Barmar Sep 30 '16 at 15:01
  • @Barmar Yes but I wanted to show him that his code is dangerous. – Dominique Lorre Sep 30 '16 at 15:02

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.