I have a div acting as a view port to an image. I want the div to expand its width on mouse over and for the image inside to stay move and stay centered as well. The following code does exactly what I want:

HTML & CSS

.image {
  width: 10%;
  background: transparent center center;
  height: 200px;
  transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -o-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -ms-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -moz-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -webkit-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
}
.image:hover {
  width: 70%;
}
<div class="image" style="background-image:url(http://www.oxfordproperties.com/corp/images/investmentCaseStudy/900NewYorkAvenue-main.jpg);"></div>

The only thing I don't like about it is putting the image url in the style attribute. I would prefer my HTML mark up to look like this:

HTML

<div class="image2">
  <img src="http://www.oxfordproperties.com/corp/images/investmentCaseStudy/900NewYorkAvenue-main.jpg" />
</div>

I tried using this CSS code to achieve the same effect:

.image2 {
  position: relative;
  width: 10%;
  height: 200px;
  overflow: hidden;
  transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -o-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -ms-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -moz-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -webkit-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
}
.image2:hover {
  width: 70%;
}
.image2 img {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
}
<div class="image2">
  <img src="http://www.oxfordproperties.com/corp/images/investmentCaseStudy/900NewYorkAvenue-main.jpg" />
</div>

But the problem with this is that in Chrome on Windows 10, there's a bit of jolting in the image (at least on my computer). While the div is collapsing in width, there's brief jolt around the time the div width is equal to the img width. How do I get rid of this jolting effect? It doesn't seem to happen on Edge browser.

Is there a better way to write my CSS so that things behave exactly like my first approach?

  • I feel like this is a pretty Chrome-specific problem, or maybe webkit? Seems to be the only browser I'm using that displays such a choppy transition. – Serlite Sep 30 '16 at 18:53
  • @Serlite let me know if you can think of alternative css implementations based on the HTML mark up? I'm working with a client who expects premium quality in their interfaces. I'm also try to make things WCAG compliant, so meaningful markup will be good. I could in theory use Javascript to copy the image src attribute into the div style attribute, but would prefer to avoid bandaids . – John Sep 30 '16 at 18:56
  • The only option I have ever seen is to force hardware acceleration by implementing 3d transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);. – Daniel Sep 30 '16 at 19:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have a look at this, I've added will-change: transform; to .image2 img meaning it will give the animation to the GPU. Does it look better for you?

Here's some info on it

.image2 {
  position: relative;
  width: 10%;
  height: 200px;
  overflow: hidden;
  transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -o-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -ms-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -moz-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
  -webkit-transition: width 2s cubic-bezier(.15, .88, 0, .99);
}
.image2:hover {
  width: 70%;
}
.image2 img {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  will-change: transform;
}
<div class="image2">
  <img src="http://www.oxfordproperties.com/corp/images/investmentCaseStudy/900NewYorkAvenue-main.jpg" />
</div>

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