45

How would I set up an index based on lower case only?

Even though the actual field contains both upper and lower case letters.

Also, can I run a query and have only the lower case index value returned?

71

You can create the index and transform the field to upper- or lower-case. Then when you do your queries, you can do the same transform and it'll do the right thing.

So:

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX lower_case_username ON users ((lower(username)));

Then query for the same thing:

SELECT username FROM users WHERE lower(username) = 'bob';
9
  • Thanks for your help! Here's my SQL statement: CREATE UNIQUE INDEX "lcase_idx" ON "public"."members" USING btree ((lower(Memb_Name))); ERROR: column "memb_name" does not exist. It seems that rather than using a lowercase of Memb_Name to build the index, the lower function is just making the name of the field referenced lower case. I tried it with and without quotes around Memb_Name. – Paul Townsend Oct 21 '10 at 16:35
  • What version of PostgreSQL are you using? I just did that on one of my tables (on 8.3) and it worked fine. What does "\d public.members" show for that column? – Pointy Oct 21 '10 at 16:45
  • I don't know what "\d public.members" is. I'm using 8.4-- I got it to work on another test table. – Paul Townsend Oct 21 '10 at 18:09
  • 1
    Also, make sure that you set your bind var to lowercase ;-) – atrain May 18 '11 at 1:06
  • 3
    @glyph No, Postgresql is smart enough to recognize that a function application matches the definition of an index. Reference – Pointy Feb 7 '17 at 2:24
9

According to the docs you can do this:

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX lower_title_idx ON films ((lower(title)));
2
  • Thanks for your help! Here's my SQL statement: CREATE UNIQUE INDEX "lcase_idx" ON "public"."members" USING btree ((lower(Memb_Name))); ERROR: column "memb_name" does not exist. It seems that rather than using a lowercase of Memb_Name to build the index, the lower function is just making the name of the field referenced lower case. I tried it with and without quotes around Memb_Name. – Paul Townsend Oct 21 '10 at 16:40
  • PS: I seems to work fine... only IF the field name is all lower case. – Paul Townsend Oct 21 '10 at 18:33
3
CREATE UNIQUE INDEX my_index_name ON my_table (LOWER(my_field));
3
  • Thanks for your help! Here's my SQL statement: CREATE UNIQUE INDEX "lcase_idx" ON "public"."members" USING btree ((lower(Memb_Name))); ERROR: column "memb_name" does not exist. It seems that rather than using a lowercase of Memb_Name to build the index, the lower function is just making the name of the field referenced lower case. I tried it with and without quotes around Memb_Name. – Paul Townsend Oct 21 '10 at 16:41
  • PS: I seems to work fine... only IF the field name is all lower case. – Paul Townsend Oct 21 '10 at 18:34
  • This is a decade later, but AFAIK PostgreSQL assumes lowercase symbol names unless you explicitly quote them. In your case, you needed to use lower("Memb_Name") – Kiran Jonnalagadda Apr 20 '20 at 7:41
0

You can also use this for wildcard searches:

CREATE INDEX IF NOT EXISTS foo_table_bar_field ON foo_table(lower(username))

Query like so:

SELECT * FROM foo_table WHERE lower(username) like 'bob%'

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