1

I would like to take an image and split it into multiple self-contained "portions". I need to be able to do this without loading the image multiple times because after a certain number of portions this will be a lot of bandwidth. For the sake of this question I would like to split an image into 4 quadrants but ideally it will be scalable.
enter image description here

Notice how there isn't just a white "window frame" overlay, the top-right quadrant starts where the top-left left off.

Here is a fiddle I made that accomplishes what I want except it has to load the image for all 4 quadrants. https://jsfiddle.net/gm4os1Ld/

#first{
  position:absolute;
  clip: rect(0, 217px, 159px, 0);
}

#second{
  position:absolute;
  left: 20px;
  clip: rect(0px,435px,159px,217px);
}
#third{
  position:absolute;
  top: 20px;
  clip: rect(159px, 217px, 318px, 0);
}
#fourth{
  position:absolute;
  left: 20px;
  top: 20px;
  clip: rect(159px,435px,318px,217px);
}

Is it possible to do that with just one image load? CSS or Jquery solutions are fine.

  • Why don't you just Load you're image once and cover it with "window frame" ? This way you just have to handle each windows. – Baldráni Sep 30 '16 at 22:06
  • 1
    "I need to be able to do this without loading the image multiple times because after a certain number of portions this will be a lot of bandwidth." That's not how browsers work. Typically, once an image is loaded the first time, the browser will cache it. That means it stores it locally for a set amount of time and subsequent requests load it from the filesystem instead of redownloading it multiple times. – Joseph Marikle Sep 30 '16 at 22:07
  • @Baldráni because then I would be hiding some of the pixels of the image, unless I'm not understanding what you mean? – DasBeasto Sep 30 '16 at 22:08
  • 1
    @DasBeasto That's a good point. It's one thing if you have full control (your own site or whatever), but for a plugin it's a little harder to predict. Someone could make that mistake, but I think that's a pretty unlikely fringe case. The only other way I can think of getting around that is to use canvas to "paint" the image parts and build your set that way, but even with that, you're more likely to hit a user that has an older version of IE that doesn't support canvas than you are to hit a website that has cache completely disabled. – Joseph Marikle Sep 30 '16 at 22:15
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    @GCyrillus that would actually work perfect for my purpose. It's not a game this part is just a static image with this styling (although those animations are a bonus). If you make that an answer I will accept it! – DasBeasto Sep 30 '16 at 22:37
1

from earlier comment

what about setting image in CSS background-position ? would it be for a puzzle game ? http://codepen.io/gc-nomade/pen/JRAdOm (used some flex and animation to move each visible parts around) your script will have to switch a class name (easier than just background-image) only once


You may use background-position, and optionnaly background-size and some animation to move each parts around. (inspired from an older codepen http://codepen.io/gc-nomade/pen/kFGya/ )

#mybox {
  width:456px;
  display:flex;
  flex-wrap:wrap;
}
.splitImg {
  padding: 5px;
  background: url(http://www.jqueryscript.net/images/Simplest-Responsive-jQuery-Image-Lightbox-Plugin-simple-lightbox.jpg) no-repeat;
  height: 159px;
  width: 218px;animation : reorder 5s infinite alternate ;
  background-clip: content-box;
  background-size:195%;
}
#first {
  background-position:5px 5px;
}
#second {
  background-position:-213px 5px;
  animation-delay:1.25s
}
#third {
  background-position:5px -154px;
  animation-delay:2.5s
}
#fourth{
  background-position:-213px -154px;
  animation-delay:3.75s
}
@keyframes reorder {
  from {
    order:1;
  }
  25% {
    order:2
  }
  50% {
    order:3
  }
  75% {order:4;
  }
  to {
    order:1;
  }
}
<div id="mybox">
  <div id="first" class="splitImg"></div>
  <div id="second" class="splitImg"></div>
  <div id="third" class="splitImg"></div>
  <div id="fourth" class="splitImg"></div>
</div>

0

I'd echo what one of the commentors said above: You don't need to do this. Browsers are smart enough to not redownload the same asset for use more than once in a document. You call the image once and you're set for as often as you need to use it further in the page.

(Unless the header for that image has been set to 'no-cache', but that's unlikely most of the time)

0

.grid { 
  width:400px;
  height:400px;
  display: inline-block;
  background:url("https://www.jqueryscript.net/images/Simplest-Responsive-jQuery-Image-Lightbox-Plugin-simple-lightbox.jpg");
  background-size:0;
  background-repeat:no-repeat;
}
.grid>div {
  display:inline-block;
  width:48%;
  height:48%;
  background:inherit;
  background-size:200% 200%;
  transition:all 1s linear;
}
#first{}
#second{  background-position-x:100%;}
#third {  background-position-y:100%;}
#fourth{  background-position-x:100%; background-position-y:100%;}

.grid>div:hover {
  transform:rotate(360deg);
}
<div class="grid">
<div id="first"></div>
<div id="second"></div>
<div id="third"></div>
<div id="fourth"></div>
</div>

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