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How can I use a regular expression to parse a generic, complex URL?

I want to get informations form URL string including protocol, host name and path.

4

Parsing URLs with Regular Expressions

You can parse URL/URI with Regular Expressions.

Example advanced URL look like:

http://login:password@www.example.org:80/demo/example.cgi?lang=de&foo=bar&empty#position

RegExr for parse that advanced URL is something like:

([^ :]*):\/\/(?:([^:]*):([^@]*)@|)([^/:]{1,}):?(\d*)?(\/[^? ]*)\??((?:[^=&# ]*=?[^&# ]*&?)*)#?([^ ]*)?

Yep, it's so crazy. But, you are able to obtain following fields from it (groups):

#1 Protocol, #2 Login, #3 Password, #4 Host name, #5 Port, #6 Path, #7 Query, #8 Fragment

Let's say you have some URL and want to know only a host name:

var myURL = "http://www.example.org/demo/example.cgi?lang=de&foo=bar&empty";

function getHostname(theURL) {
    var Expr = /([^ :]*):\/\/(?:([^:]*):([^@]*)@|)([^/:]{1,}):?(\d*)?(\/[^? ]*)\??((?:[^=&# ]*=?[^&# ]*&?)*)#?([^ ]*)?/g,
        match = Expr.exec(theURL);
    if(match && match[0]) {
        return match[4]; // #4th group of RegExpr
    }
}

var myHostname = getHostname(myURL);

console.log(myHostname);

I create aslo a nice table where you can find RegExpr for every entries (at group #1) of URL string:

| URL entry name    | Example               | Regular Expression              |
| ----------------- | --------------------- | ------------------------------- |
| Protocol          | http                  | ([^ :]*):\/\/                   |
| Login             | admin                 | \/\/([^:]*):[^@]*(?=@)          |
| Password          | 12345                 | \/\/[^:]*:([^@]*)(?=@)          |
| Host name         | www.example.org       | (?:@|\/\/)([^/:]{1,})           |
| Domain parts      | www, example, org     | (?:@|\/\/|\.)([^./:]*)(?=[./:]) |
| Port              | 80                    | :(\d*)\/[^/]                    |
| Path              | /demo/example.cgi     | \/\/([^/][^? ]*)\??             |
| File name         | example.cgi           | ([^?/]*(?!\/))\?                |
| Query string      | lang=de&foo=bar&empty | \?((?:[^=&# ]*=?[^&# ]*&?)*)    |
| Fragment/position | position              | #([^ ]*)                        |

Additionally, you can parse the query string using ([^=&# ]*)=?([^&# ]*)&? and iterating the matches:

var myQueryString = "lang=de&foo=bar&empty";

function parseQueryString(theQueryString) {
    var Expr = /([^=&# ]*)=?([^&# ]*)&?/g,
        QueryEntries = {},
        match;
    
    // If no match left it returns ["", undefinied, undefinied], 
    // ["", "", ""] or null - depends on JavaScript engine/web browser.
    // There is litte trick: "" and null is like false, so only check for [""].
    while((match = Expr.exec(theQueryString)) && match[0]) {
        QueryEntries[match[1]] = match[2] || '';
    }
    return QueryEntries;
}

var myQueryEntries = parseQueryString(myQueryString);

console.log(myQueryEntries);

You can test your RegExpr easily on http://regexr.com/.

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1

Don't use regex. Use an URL parser.

function parseURL(url) {
  var a = document.createElement('a');
  a.href = url;
  return a;
}
var urlData = parseURL('https://username:password@sub.example.com:123/foo/bar?a=b#c');
console.log(urlData.protocol); // https:
console.log(urlData.username); // username
console.log(urlData.password); // password
console.log(urlData.host);     // sub.example.com:123
console.log(urlData.hostname); // sub.example.com
console.log(urlData.port);     // 123
console.log(urlData.pathname); // /foo/bar
console.log(urlData.search);   // ?a=b
console.log(urlData.hash);     // #c
console.log(urlData.origin);   // https://sub.example.com:123
console.log(urlData.href);     // https://username:password@sub.example.com:123/foo/bar?a=b#c

There is also the URL interface. Has less browser support, but semantically it may be better than a DOM element.

var urlData = new URL('https://username:password@sub.example.com:123/foo/bar?a=b#c');
console.log(urlData.protocol); // https:
console.log(urlData.username); // username
console.log(urlData.password); // password
console.log(urlData.host);     // sub.example.com:123
console.log(urlData.hostname); // sub.example.com
console.log(urlData.port);     // 123
console.log(urlData.pathname); // /foo/bar
console.log(urlData.search);   // ?a=b
console.log(urlData.hash);     // #c
console.log(urlData.origin);   // https://sub.example.com:123
console.log(urlData.href);     // https://username:password@sub.example.com:123/foo/bar?a=b#c

|improve this answer|||||
  • There's no mention of browser/dom in the "question". This method is not JavaScript based. – Amit Oct 1 '16 at 21:44
  • @Amit The DOM is part of JS. It's not part of ECMAScript, if that's what you mean. – Oriol Oct 1 '16 at 21:45
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    No no no. It's part of the browser, an appendix to the reference if anything. Javascript exists without these features (marquee example being Node of course). – Amit Oct 1 '16 at 21:47
  • @Amit Technically JavaScript is Netscape's and Mozilla's implementation of ECMAScript, so yes, it's a browser thingie. Other browser-based implementations like Microsoft's JScript are usually called JavaScript too. But I wouldn't say Node is JavaScript. – Oriol Oct 1 '16 at 21:54
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    That's just marketing. They say "JavaScript" because lots of people have heard about JavaScript but not about ECMAScript. Similarly (but for compatibility purposes), IE includes "Mozilla" in its user agent, but that doesn't mean IE was developed by Mozilla... – Oriol Oct 1 '16 at 22:04

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