1 quick question on Spring JPA repositories transactionality. I have a service that is not marked as transactional and calls Spring JPA repository method

userRegistrationRepository.deleteByEmail(email);

And it is defined as

@Repository
public interface UserRegistrationRepository extends JpaRepository<UserRegistration, Long> {

    UserRegistration findByEmail(String email);

    void deleteByEmail(String email);

}

The problem is that it fails with "No EntityManager with actual transaction available for current thread - cannot reliably process 'remove' call; nested exception is javax.persistence.TransactionRequiredException" exception.

Ok, I can solve it by marking the service or deleteByEmail(..) method as transactional, but I just can't understand why it crashes now. Spring documentation explicitly states that "CRUD methods on repository instances are transactional by default." (http://docs.spring.io/spring-data/jpa/docs/current/reference/html/#transactions), but apparently this one is not... So Is this statement related to only members of CrudRepository?

ps: that's for Spring Data JPA 1.9.4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You are right. Only CRUD methods (CrudRepository methods) are by default marked as transactional. If you are using custom query methods you should explicitly mark it with @Transactional annotation.

@Repository
public interface UserRegistrationRepository extends JpaRepository<UserRegistration, Long> {

    UserRegistration findByEmail(String email);

    @Transactional
    void deleteByEmail(String email);

}

You should also be aware about consequences of marking repository interface methods instead of service methods. If you are using default transaction propagation configuration (Propagation.REQUIRED) then:

The transaction configuration at the repositories will be neglected then as the outer transaction configuration determines the actual one used.

http://docs.spring.io/spring-data/jpa/docs/current/reference/html/#transactions

  • In spring-data-jpa:2.0.9, there is no @Transactional annotation in the source code of JpaRepository or its ancestors - the default transactionality seems to be applied at runtime. Also note that if you put @Transactional( ... custom properties ... ) on your repository interface, it will apply to all methods declared in your interface, and in child interfaces -- but not to any methods declared in the parent interface (JpaRepository) unless you redeclare them. – Andrew Spencer Oct 12 at 15:00

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