12

I'm fighting with the borrow checker. I have two similar pieces of code, one working as I expect, and the other not.

The one that works as I expect:

mod case1 {
    struct Foo {}

    struct Bar1 {
        x: Foo,
    }

    impl Bar1 {
        fn f<'a>(&'a mut self) -> &'a Foo {
            &self.x
        }
    }

    // only for example
    fn f1() {
        let mut bar = Bar1 { x: Foo {} };
        let y = bar.f(); // (1) 'bar' is borrowed by 'y'
        let z = bar.f();  // error (as expected) : cannot borrow `bar` as mutable more
                           // than once at a time [E0499]
    }

    fn f2() {
        let mut bar = Bar1 { x: Foo {} };
        bar.f(); // (2) 'bar' is not borrowed after the call
        let z = bar.f();  // ok (as expected)
    }
}

The one that doesn't:

mod case2 {
    struct Foo {}

    struct Bar2<'b> {
        x: &'b Foo,
    }

    impl<'b> Bar2<'b> {
        fn f(&'b mut self) -> &'b Foo {
            self.x
        }
    }

    fn f4() {
        let foo = Foo {};
        let mut bar2 = Bar2 { x: &foo };
        bar2.f(); // (3) 'bar2' is borrowed as mutable, but who borrowed it?
        let z = bar2.f(); // error: cannot borrow `bar2` as mutable more than once at a time [E0499]
    }
}

I hoped I could call Bar2::f twice without irritating the compiler, as in case 1.

The question is in the comment (3): who borrowed bar2, whereas there is no affectation?

Here's what I understand:

  1. In case 1, f2 call: the lifetime parameter 'a is the one of the receiving &Foo value, so this lifetime is empty when there is no affectation, and bar is not borrowed after the Bar1::f call;

  2. In case 2, bar2 borrows foo (as immutable), so the lifetime parameter 'b in Bar2 struct is the foo reference lifetime, which ends at the end of f4 body. Calling Bar2::f borrows bar2 for that lifetime, namely to the end of f4.

But the question is still: who borrowed bar2? Could it be Bar2::f? How Bar2::f would hold the borrowed ownership after the call? What am I missing here?

I'm using Rust 1.14.0-nightly (86affcdf6 2016-09-28) on x86_64-pc-windows-msvc.

9

Ah... you basically self-borrowed yourself.

The issue hinges on the fact that you have the same lifetime ('b) used for both the lifetime of Foo and the lifetime of Bar. The compiler then dutifully unifies those lifetimes, and you end up in a strange situation where suddenly the lifetime of the borrow which should have ended at the end of the statement instead ends after the value should have gone out of scope.

As a rule of thumb: always use a fresh lifetime for self. Anything else is weird.


It's interesting to note that this pattern can actually be useful (though more likely with an immutable borrow): it allows anchoring a value to a stack frame, preventing any move after the call to the function, which is (sometimes) useful to represent a borrow that is not well-modeled by Rust (like passing a pointer to the value to FFI).

  • Accepted because of this valuable rule of thumb. Thanks. – jferard Oct 5 '16 at 18:34
9

In case #2, you have this:

impl<'b> Bar2<'b> {
    fn f(&'b mut self) -> &'b Foo {
        self.x
    }
}

To highlight: &'b mut self and &'b Foo have the same lifetime specified.

This is saying that the reference to self and the returned reference to an instance of a Foo both have the same lifetime. Looking at the call site, you have this:

let foo = Foo {};
let mut bar2 = Bar2 { x: &foo };

So the compiler is inferring that both foo and bar2 have the same lifetime. The lifetime of foo is the scope of the f4 function, and so the mutable reference to bar2 shares this.

One way to fix this, is to remove the explicit lifetime on the self reference:

fn f(&mut self) -> &'b Foo

This compiles and the compiler correctly understands that the reference to bar2 and the reference to foo have different lifetimes.

Playground: https://play.rust-lang.org/?gist=caf262dd628cf14cc2884a3af842276a&version=stable&backtrace=0

TLDR: Yes, having the same lifetime specifier on the self reference and the returned reference means that the entire scope of f4 holds a mutable borrow of bar2.

1

I put the body of f4() in a main() and implemented Drop for Bar2 to find out when it is dropped (i.e. goes out of scope):

impl<'b> Drop for Bar2<'b> {
    fn drop(&mut self) { println!("dropping Bar2!"); }
}

And the result was:

error: `bar2` does not live long enough
  --> <anon>:24:5
   |
24 |     bar2.f();
   |     ^^^^ does not live long enough
25 | }
   | - borrowed value dropped before borrower
   |
   = note: values in a scope are dropped in the opposite order they are created

Something's fishy; let's examine it in detail, with helper scopes:

fn main() {
    {
        let foo = Foo {}; // foo scope begins
        {
            let mut bar2 = Bar2 { x: &foo }; // bar2 scope begins; bar2 borrows foo
            bar2.f();
        } // bar2 should be dropped here, but it has the same lifetime as foo, which is still live
    } // foo is dropped (its scope ends)
}

It looks to me that there is a leak here and bar2 is never dropped (and thus Drop cannot be implemented for it). That's why you cannot re-borrow it.

1

I would like to add about the roles that subtyping/variance play here.

&mut T is invariant over T. Given two types T and U, where T < U (T is a subtype of U), then &mut T has no subtyping relation with &mut U (i.e they are invariant with each other), whereas &T is a subtype of &U (&T < &U). But &'lifetime and &'lifetime mut, both are covariant over 'lifetime. So given two lifetimes 'a and 'b for a type T, where 'a outlives 'b, then as per subtyping relation &'a T < &'b T, similarly &'a mut T < &'b mut T

Coming to the question, in the call to function f, self is a reference to Bar2<'a>. The compiler will see if it can "temporarily shorten" the life of bar2 to fit around the scope of the function f's invocation say 'x, as if bar2 and foo were created just before f is called and go away immediately after f (i.e temporary shortening: assuming variable bar2 created within 'x and hence Bar2<'a> to Bar2<'x>, 'a being the original (real) lifetime). But here, "shortening" is not possible; One, because of mutable reference to self and two, same lifetime on references to Foo as well as Bar2 (self), in the function f's definition. Firstly, since it is a mutable reference, it can't convert Bar2<'a> to Bar2<'x>, because &mut Bar2<'a> and &mut Bar2<'x> are invariant with each other. (remember even if T < U or T > U, then &mut T is invariant with &mut U). So the compiler has to go with Bar2<'a> and secondly, since the function f is having the same lifetimes for references to Bar2 and Foo, can't convert &'a Bar2<'a> to &'x Bar2<'a>. So it means the references aren't "shortened" when calling the function f and they will remain valid till the end of the block.

If self's lifetime is elided, then the compiler will give a fresh lifetime to the self (disjoint with 'b), which means it is free to "temporarily shorten" the life of Bar2 and then pass it's mut reference to f. i.e It will do &'a mut Bar2<'a> to &'x mut Bar2<'a> and then pass it to f. (remember &'lifetime mut is covariant over 'lifetime) and hence it will work.

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