34

I want to use a loop to load and/or modify data and plot the result within the loop using Bokeh (I am familiar with Matplotlib's axes.color_cycle). Here is a simple example

import numpy as np
from bokeh.plotting import figure, output_file, show
output_file('bokeh_cycle_colors.html')

p = figure(width=400, height=400)
x = np.linspace(0, 10)

for m in xrange(10):
    y = m * x
    p.line(x, y, legend='m = {}'.format(m))

p.legend.location='top_left'
show(p)

which generates this plot

bokeh plot

How do I make it so the colors cycle without coding up a list of colors and a modulus operation to repeat when the number of colors runs out?

There was some discussion on GitHub related to this, issues 351 and 2201, but it is not clear how to make this work. The four hits I got when searching the documentation for cycle color did not actually contain the word cycle anywhere on the page.

1
  • The color cycler package, developed as part of matplotlib, may be useful for creating a dictionary that could be used to cycle more than just the color. Commented Oct 11, 2016 at 12:48

4 Answers 4

41

It is probably easiest to just get the list of colors and cycle it yourself using itertools:

import numpy as np
from bokeh.plotting import figure, output_file, show

# select a palette
from bokeh.palettes import Dark2_5 as palette
# itertools handles the cycling
import itertools  

output_file('bokeh_cycle_colors.html')

p = figure(width=400, height=400)
x = np.linspace(0, 10)

# create a color iterator
colors = itertools.cycle(palette)    

for m, color in zip(range(10), colors):
    y = m * x
    p.line(x, y, legend='m = {}'.format(m), color=color)

p.legend.location='top_left'
show(p)

enter image description here

1
  • 5
    You could also create the iterator then set color=next(colors) to skip the zip. Commented Dec 18, 2018 at 12:19
10

You can define a simple generator that cycles colors for you.

In python 3:

from bokeh.palettes import Category10
import itertools

def color_gen():
    yield from itertools.cycle(Category10[10])
color = color_gen()

or in python 2 (or 3):

from bokeh.palettes import Category10
import itertools

def color_gen():
    for c in itertools.cycle(Category10[10]):
        yield c
color = color_gen()

and when you need a new color, do:

p.line(x, y1, line_width=2, color=color)
p.line(x, y2, line_width=2, color=color)

Here is the above example:

p = figure(width=400, height=400)
x = np.linspace(0, 10)

for m, c in zip(range(10), color):
    y = m * x
    p.line(x, y, legend='m = {}'.format(m), color=c)

p.legend.location='top_left'
show(p)

enter image description here

1
  • 6
    The color_gen functions amount to wrappers on itertools.cycle that don't actually do anything.
    – Elliot
    Commented Aug 11, 2018 at 12:04
7

Two small changes will make prior answer work for Python 3.

  • changed: for m, color in zip(range(10), colors):

  • prior: for m, color in itertools.izip(xrange(10), colors):

0
4

In Python > 3.7 you could do something like this:

from bokeh.palettes import Category10_10
       
color = Category10_10.__iter__()

p.line(x, y1, line_width=2, color=next(color))

This will cycle through each element of the list until exhausted each time you use next().

Every sequence type in python can return an iterator object.

4
  • 3
    This method has one disadvantage. The iterator is not cyclic. the 11th call of next() will raise exception. Commented Oct 7, 2020 at 17:52
  • Very true, I was just putting forward a minimal example highlighting the in-build iterator object from sequence types
    – crowie
    Commented Nov 4, 2020 at 0:19
  • 2
    I'd say color = iter(Category10_10) would be strongly preferable.
    – NichtJens
    Commented Jun 2, 2021 at 20:47
  • Same thing but yes you're right it looks nicer
    – crowie
    Commented Jun 11, 2021 at 6:38

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