34

In my notification service I have to send the notifications by mail, but in dev I want to send all the email to a specific adress:

if ( $this->container->get('kernel')->getEnvironment() == "dev" ) {

    mail( '[email protected]', $lib, $txt, $entete );

} else {

    mail( $to->getEmail(), $lib, $txt, $entete );

}

But the $this->container->get('kernel')->getEnvironment() works only in a controller.

I think I have to add an argument in my service constructor:

notification:
  class:      %project.notification.class%
  arguments: [@templating, @doctrine]

But I didn't find any information about this.

0

10 Answers 10

67

There is no need to inject container. In fact, it is not a good idea to inject container because you're making your class dependent on the DI.

You should inject environment parameter:

services.yml

notification:
  class:      NotificationService
  arguments: ["%kernel.environment%"]

NotificationService.php

<?php

private $env;

public function __construct($env)
{
    $this->env = $env;
}

public function mailStuff()
{
    if ( $this->env == "dev" ) {
        mail( '[email protected]', $lib, $txt, $entete );  
    } else {
        mail( $to->getEmail(), $lib, $txt, $entete );
    }
}
4
  • 2
    True, but as stated in the answer above, there's even simpler: Symfony comes with a built in functionnality to send emails in a specific address, you just have to set the right configuration in your app/config/config_dev.yml in this case. There's no need to handle this logic in your service.
    – Boulzy
    Commented Oct 4, 2016 at 6:23
  • 1
    Thx for the best practices ! But I have to do the same process with the slack notifications (to be sent only in prod)
    – Paul
    Commented Oct 4, 2016 at 7:12
  • 2
    best practice in that case would still be to use the config files. You can have a slack address parameter that is only set for production yams, and is null in the dev yaml, and check whether or not it is null before you act. Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 19:06
  • Another option would be to bind the argument "%kernel.environment%" to $appEnv or something.
    – Bradley
    Commented Oct 26, 2022 at 16:15
38

For Symfony 4 you could do:

use Symfony\Component\HttpKernel\KernelInterface;

class SomeService
{
    /**
     * @var string
     */
    private $environment;

    /**
     * Your Service constructor.
     */
    public function __construct(KernelInterface $kernel)
    {
        $this->environment = $kernel->getEnvironment();
    }
}

$this->environment now holds your environment like dev, prod or test.

7

In Symfony 4 (maybe 3.x, too) you can fetch the environment in a controller like this:

$env = $this->getParameter('kernel.environment');

(No explicit controller injection via services.yaml needed)

1
  • 1
    @Dan No, getParameter() is a Container method and passing the container to a service is considered bad practice. It is recommended to pass parameters one by one to a service via $arguments in the service definition. Commented Jan 16, 2023 at 8:46
5

The reason you can get $this->container in a controller is because it is injected into the controller that you extend.

For example, you could inject in the container and set it up in your constructor.

services.yml

notification:
  class:      %project.notification.class%
  arguments: [@templating, @doctrine]

NotificationService.php

<?php

private $container;

public function __construct()
{
    $this->container = $container;
}

public function mailStuff()
{
    if ( $this->container->get('kernel')->getEnvironment() == "dev" ) {
        mail( '[email protected]', $lib, $txt, $entete );  
    } else {
        mail( $to->getEmail(), $lib, $txt, $entete );
    }
}

Have a look at dependency injection for more information.


PLEASE NOTE

Generally, injecting in the container is bad and means there is a better way to do something. In this case, Symfony already has the solution that we're trying to solve.

Enter SwiftMailer.

And specifically, the section on sending all dev emails to a set address.

Give it a go at setting up Swiftmailer and add the following to your dev config.

app/config/config_dev.yml

swiftmailer:
    delivery_address: '[email protected]'
0
4

You can get all environments in .env file with $_ENV superglobal, thanks to dotenv

$_ENV['APP_ENV']

3
  • 3
    Yes, but it's not a good practice when using Symfony to access superglobals directly.
    – COil
    Commented Oct 10, 2020 at 17:58
  • 2
    Using global variables in the application code is a bad practice.
    – Ilya Levin
    Commented Dec 21, 2020 at 6:53
  • 1
    very very bad practice, i wrote just an alternative approach Commented Dec 29, 2020 at 18:21
2

Actually you should not need to get the actual environment. For example if you need to send slack notifications only on production you can configure send_slack_notification parameter and set it to true/false in the different environments.

Then in your code you can do something like:

if ($parameters->get('send_slack_notification') == true) {
    //send the notifications
}

By using this approach you can later turn on/off this setting in different environments without changing your implementation. Another benefit is that when you check your parameters file you can right away see all the options in the different environments and this will make debugging easier.

NOTE

KernelInterface $kernel->getEnvironment() can return both lowercase and uppercase results depending on how you've configured in your .env files. Another reason why you should't use it.

1

In symfony you can bind default value by $variableName.

config/services.yaml

services:
    _defaults:
        bind:
            $kernelEnvironment: '%kernel.environment%'

NotificationService.php

private $env;

public function __construct($kernelEnvironment)
{
    $this->env = $kernelEnvironment;
}
0

If you are into a static class and don't have access to the container, you always can do this inside the AppKernel.php->registerBundles():

$_ENV['APP_ENV'] = $this->getEnvironment();

That way you will always have the environment inside the superglobal $_ENV.
It's kinda a hack, but works like a charm.

0

I would like to have a return of my code.

.env.local :

API_KEY_TOTO="azerty" 

But it is possible to pass the environment variable in the service.yml file. Here is an example

config/services.yaml

App\Service\MyService:
  bind:
      $apiKeyToto: '%env(API_KEY_TOTO)%'

App\Service\MyService.php :

class MyService {

private $client;
private $apiKeyToto;

public function __construct(HttpClientInterface $client, string $apiKeyToto)
{
    $this->client = $client;
    $this->apiKeyToto= $apiKeyToto;
}

public function getAllRepository(): array
{
    return $this->getApi('/users/{username}/repos?&type=all&direction=desc&per_page=100');
}

private function getApi(string $url)
{
    $response = $this->client->request('GET', 'https://api.github.com' . $url, [
            'auth_basic' => ['username', $this->apiKeyToto],
        ]
    );

    return $response->toArray();
}

}

If you have any other suggestions.

0

If you use the Symfony Mailer component to send emails. You don't need to get the environment. Just define a new env variable that contains your specific address and put it in the EnvelopeListener

service.yaml

mailer.set_recipients:
    class: Symfony\Component\Mailer\EventListener\EnvelopeListener
    tags: ['kernel.event_subscriber']
    arguments:
        $sender: null
        $recipients: '%env(json:ALL_MAIL_RECIPIENT)%'

.env

ALL_MAIL_RECIPIENT='[]'

.env.local

ALL_MAIL_RECIPIENT='["[email protected]"]'

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