-2

I am trying to create a program that allows the user to input a chosen amount of numbers, and in return the user gets two lists. One shows which of the numbers are prime numbers, the other gives non-primes. Why doesn't this work? I end up getting all the numbers in the same array, when I want them in separate arrays. When initializing isPrime to true in the isPrime method, all the numbers go into the prime array and into the notPrime array when I initialize it as false.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("How many numbers do you want to input?");
    Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    int number = in.nextInt();
    int[] values = new int[number];
    for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
        System.out.println("Give value number " + (i+1) + ":");
        values[i] = in.nextInt();
    }
    int[] prime = new int[values.length];
    int[] notPrime = new int[values.length];
    for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {    
        boolean erPrimtall = erPrimtall(values[i]);
        if(isPrime == true) {   
            prime[i] = values[i];
        } else {
            notPrime[i] = values[i];
        }
    }
    System.out.println("Prime numbers:");
    for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++){
            System.out.println(prime[i]);
        }
        System.out.println("Other numbers:");
        for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++){
            System.out.println(notPrime[i]);
        }
    }
    inn.close();
}

static boolean isPrimtall(int values) {
    boolean isPrime = true;
    for(int i = 2; i < Math.sqrt(values); i++) {
        if(values % i == 0) {
            isPrime= false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return isPrime;
}

closed as off-topic by Jim Garrison, talex, coatless, karthik, Drew Oct 7 '16 at 23:38

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Reproducible Example." – Jim Garrison, talex, coatless, karthik, Drew
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    Please explain what "does not work" means, and tell us what you have done to troubleshoot so far. Please also visit the help center and read How to Ask to learn how to use this site effectively. – Jim Garrison Oct 4 '16 at 15:27
  • 1
    you code has a typo: verdier is not defined. it should be values instead. – LKHO Oct 4 '16 at 15:30
0

Your erPrimtall function has true/false values reversed.

static boolean erPrimtall(int values) {
    boolean isPrime = true;
    for(int i = 2; i < values; i++) {
        if(values % i == 0) {
            isPrime= false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return isPrime;
}

You could optimize this function further by looping only until i <= Math.sqrt(values)

I also suggest using an ArrayList instead of arrays to store the prime and non-primes otherwise you will have to do some bookkeeping to keep track of how many primes/non-primes there are so far.

Full revised code:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("How many numbers do you want to input?");
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        int number = in.nextInt();
        int[] values = new int[number];
        for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
            System.out.println("Give value number " + (i+1) + ":");
            values[i] = in.nextInt();
        }
        List<Integer> prime = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        List<Integer> notPrime = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
            if(erPrimtall(values[i])) {
                prime.add(values[i]);
            } else {
                notPrime.add(values[i]);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Prime numbers:");
        for(int n : prime){
            System.out.println(n);
        }
        System.out.println("Other numbers:");
        for(int n : notPrime) {
            System.out.println(n);
        }
        in.close();
    }

    static boolean erPrimtall(int values) {
        boolean isPrime = true;
        for(int i = 2; i <= Math.sqrt(values); i++) {
            if(values % i == 0) {
                isPrime = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        return isPrime;
    }
}
  • The only difference is that I now get all values in the array for primes instead of the array for non-primes. I'm not able to have the primes and non-primes in separate arrays. – Dre Jay Oct 4 '16 at 15:42
  • I updated my answer. I'm not sure why it wouldn't separate primes and non-primes but it would add a bunch of unintended zeroes into primes and non-primes in your implementation. – Andrew Jenkins Oct 4 '16 at 16:03
  • I had to use arrays specifically, not ArrayLists. But I figured it out. Thanks anyways! – Dre Jay Oct 4 '16 at 18:03
0

I figured it out. I had to make the boolean variable isPrime into an array. All the integer values are now corresponding to one boolean value in the boolean array.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.